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Author Topic: How Blogging (or Coding) Can Rot Your Teeth  (Read 2556 times)
app103
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« on: August 09, 2012, 12:19:13 AM »

I know this isn't something that most computer users think about, but spending a lot of time at your computer can be harmful to your teeth. Fear not though...there are things you can do to prevent the damage.


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mouser
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« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2012, 05:15:25 AM »

Thanks for the post, app  thumbs up
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kyrathaba
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2012, 06:55:02 AM »

Hadn't ever considered this. Thanks for the tip, app!
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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2012, 07:10:37 AM »

So... By that logic, sleeping must also be bad for ones teeth. Unless of course they talk in their sleep. I have a really hard time buying this as there are a multitude of reasons people can have for not being loquacious. It doesn't necessarily have to mean your mouth has to dry out ... as I'm sure salivation rates vary. Here's a thought... Who is most likely to need-a-drink? Some one waiting in line alone? Or someone giving a speech??
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app103
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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2012, 10:27:21 AM »

So... By that logic, sleeping must also be bad for ones teeth. Unless of course they talk in their sleep.

It would explain the morning breath phenomenon.

Who is most likely to need-a-drink? Some one waiting in line alone? Or someone giving a speech??

Don't confuse dry mouth with dry throat. One doesn't necessarily have anything to do with the other.

I don't think this dentist's advice could hurt you if he's wrong and could only help if he is right. I do know the habit a lot of people have of guzzling a lot of sugar loaded soft drinks, tea, coffee, etc while working can't be good for your teeth, so just the act of replacing that with water could do a lot of people's teeth a lot of good. And don't forget that even if you use a sugar-free sweetener in your tea or coffee, if you are adding milk, it still has sugar in it.

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allen
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« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2012, 11:14:28 AM »

When I'm coding, there's a constant stream of coffee (just black) and water going through my oral cavity. Actually, that statement is true for pretty much any time I'm awake.
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barney
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« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2012, 05:38:24 PM »

When I'm coding, there's a constant stream of coffee (just black) and water going through my oral cavity. Actually, that statement is true for pretty much any time I'm awake.

+1

If there's not a beverage on my desk, I'm not sitting at it  Wink.  Coffee (two (2) cups in the morning), water, tea at midafternoon, adult beverage(s) later.  My mouth may not be a haven of health, but it is seldom, if ever, dry  tongue.
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« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2012, 06:18:20 PM »

Quote
So... By that logic, sleeping must also be bad for ones teeth. Unless of course they talk in their sleep.

As per ayurveda (ancient indian hit-n-miss medicine study), our mouth develops anti-bacterial liquid and protects tongue and teeth while we are taking nap. Drinking a glass of water before brushing teeth helps because if that liquid goes into stomach, improves digestion, works against acne and some other stuff.
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