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Author Topic: bicycling suddenly a British speciality?!  (Read 2522 times)
Curt
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« on: July 22, 2012, 01:31:03 PM »

Congratulations, U.K., on Bradley Wiggins' winning the Tour de France 2012, and, even over the hill, Christopher Froome being number 2! Fantastic! Does Brits think the Manx is part of England? If so, they must think Mark Cavendish made the British triumph total.

However, England has only lately taken interest in bicycling-racing, so...  
forgive me for thinking it, and now even saying it out loud:
I smell a doped rat - and it is speaking English!

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tomos
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« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2012, 02:28:04 PM »

Congratulations, U.K., on Bradley Wiggins' winning the Tour de France 2012, and, even over the hill, Christopher Froome being number 2! Fantastic! Does Brits think the Manx is part of England? If so, they must think Mark Cavendish made the British triumph total.

However, England has only lately taken interest in bicycling-racing, so... 
forgive me for thinking it, and now even saying it out loud:
I smell a doped rat - and it is speaking English!

Could be the other way around - all the others stopped doping... and suddenly the British are best ;-)
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Tom
IainB
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2012, 05:32:39 PM »

...I smell a doped rat - and it is speaking English!
Nonsense. Rat's don't speak - they squeak. Put those pills away before you do yourself some harm.    Wink
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Renegade
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« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2012, 09:52:56 PM »

Congratulations, U.K., on Bradley Wiggins' winning the Tour de France 2012, and, even over the hill, Christopher Froome being number 2! Fantastic! Does Brits think the Manx is part of England? If so, they must think Mark Cavendish made the British triumph total.

However, England has only lately taken interest in bicycling-racing, so... 
forgive me for thinking it, and now even saying it out loud:
I smell a doped rat - and it is speaking English!

Kind of OT, but perhaps worth a laugh on the topic of cycling:



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JennyB
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« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2012, 03:34:23 AM »


Could be the other way around - all the others stopped doping... and suddenly the British are best ;-)


There's something in that. It's been a lot more consistent lately, and easier to spot the suspicious performances. The nucleus of the Sky team (not just the riders) is the same squad that was so successful at the Beijing Olympics, so it's been about seven years in preparation.

They had only one aim in mind - to win the General Classification.

The last three years Cav was riding with a team that specialised in getting him into the right position to win the sprints: this year he was leading climbs, fetching water, doing everything he could for Wiggins.  

To win the GC you have to be either a great climber (like Contador) and not lose too much on the time trials, or a great time trialler like Wiggins and not lose it on the mountains. Wiggins proved he could get over the mountains two years ago when he came third, but he was on his own in the end. This time he had some great climbers to help him.
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Curt
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« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2012, 04:53:05 AM »

The last three years Cav was riding with a team that specialised in getting him into the right position to win the sprints

For those who don't know, "Cav" is Mark Cavendish:

(click thumbnail for 1024x745 pixels, 514kb):



http://www.flickr.com/pho...os/edwinjones/7654942026/

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Deozaan
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« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2012, 11:03:50 AM »

For those who don't know, "Cav" is Mark Cavendish:

(click thumbnail for 1024x745 pixels, 514kb):
 (see attachment in previous post)

Looks like a shop to me. I can tell by some of the pixels and also from seeing plenty of shops in my day.  Wink
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Curt
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« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2012, 02:28:28 PM »

-Photoshop, yes, (among many other programs), but not in the sense that it should be a fake.
Exif data: http://www.flickr.com/pho...42026/meta/in/photostream
Read http://edwinjonesphotogra...ish-race-to-victory-paris for the full story.

and see the original photo:




and one from a previous round:



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IainB
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« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2012, 06:55:41 PM »

Despite the hype, the British win is not all that spectacular.
For example, and to put it into perspective: Germany takes all-classes win of the 1940 Tour de France - and I don't think this earlier Tour de France shot was Photoshopped, either.



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tomos
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« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2012, 01:47:52 PM »


I want to respond to this Iain, but I'm not quite sure how to...
It's political. It's inappropriate. It's offensive imo - and no, I'm not a denier of anything. I'd be happy to fill you in on my views and/or debate with you - but it would be very off-topic for this thread.
(I dont know if dc would be the place for it at all - probably not even in the soapbox, in the light of it being "downgraded" to the basement - but if you want to start a thread there I will respond, or PM me).

PS this has nothing to do with whether it's funny or not ;-)
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Tom
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« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2012, 07:02:41 AM »

just saw that poor Cav was a bit upset with the world after the Olympic men's road race because they (the rest of the competitors) didn't ride to suit the British team.
Dearie me, how sad smiley
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IainB
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« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2012, 09:53:43 AM »

I want to respond to this Iain, but I'm not quite sure how to...
It's political. It's inappropriate. It's offensive imo - and no, I'm not a denier of anything. I'd be happy to fill you in on my views and/or debate with you - but it would be very off-topic for this thread.
(I dont know if dc would be the place for it at all - probably not even in the soapbox, in the light of it being "downgraded" to the basement - but if you want to start a thread there I will respond, or PM me).
PS this has nothing to do with whether it's funny or not ;-)

@tomos: Oh dear, sorry. It was intended as a funny and legitimate bit of black humour, and appropriate in the context of the Tour de France. One of the guys in our local road-cycling club (his parents emigrated here from France years ago and so he adopted the nickname "Pierre", though his Christian name is "Peter") had circulated the picture with the caption about it being the Germans winning the 1940 TdeF.
He seemed to think it was very funny, and so did the rest of us - I found it LOL funny, for example. I feel sure that Pierre was not intending to be "political" or offensive to anyone, but I shall ask him nontheless.

Coming back to topic, the joke was using humorous litotes in suggesting that:
Quote
...the British win is not all that spectacular.
The win is in fact a phenomenal achievement for Britain, which has formerly had a relatively poor record in international cycling events - though many of the people have always had a keen interest in cycling per se. I can personally vouch for that latter point - I built my first drop-handle bar road-racing bicycle at the age of 11, using secondhand parts from small-sized frames with 26" wheels. I stripped and cleaned the rusty frame (Raleigh), and then painted it with spray-paint. I knew and loved every component of that bike, down to the last ball-bearing.
Me and my mates formed a bike club (they all had new bikes), where we helped each other and competitively timed ourselves over fixed distances and terrain (this was in North Wales) - hillclimb, descent, flat.
My interest in competitive cycling continued when I later lived in Switzerland, where I had the opportunity to cycle in France, Germany, Italy and Switzerland. The hardest challenge I ever faced was a ride called "the Ollon hillclimb" up to Villars - utterly knackered, I had to keep stopping for rests (I don't think the altitude helped).

Nowadays, I cycle easier terrain in Auckland (New Zealand), and map my favourite/regular routes to the Internet, trying (not always successfully) to maintain distances of 90Km/week. When my daughter Lily (now age 10) has accompanied me, we make it a pleasant and easy exercise, stopping off for fuel and a treat at McDonalds or Subway on the return leg.
My bike is a beautiful bike - a Trek SL1000 with a 58cm black/silver frame and reinforced "Taupo" tyres. I bought it because I could get it at a serious discount (traded-in my old-style bike), not because it happens to be the same model ridden by the amazing 7-times TdeF winner Lance Armstrong (US)!

On which point I would mention that all international sporting events - e.g., including the Olympics, The Tour de France, The Americas Cup, the Rugby World Cup - are hugely commercialised and highly politicised events (QED). I feel that Britain is doing a famous job of actualising its potential in sport, in things such as, for example, the Olympics and the TdeF.
I do not say that as a political statement (couldn't care less about the politics, really), but as an exiled pom who is pleased to see that the old country apparently still has some national strength of character and substance.
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IainB
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« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2012, 12:05:36 AM »

I just thought I'd revisit this thread with an interesting bit of news with a twist, from the UK, on the cycling front.
One of my old UK cycling mates had alerted me to a BBC1 TV proggie in the 1st week of Dec.: The War on Britain's Roads.
After a lot of mucking about with free-use proxy servers, I managed to see a few bits of it, and it looked surprisingly good, and worriesome.
However, I was very surprised to read in the Guardian's bike blog that a lot of it was apparently staged (made up) and quite deliberately alarmist, and without any good substantiation. It was apparently a fake - a well-fabricated docu-drama, and the Guardian bloke (a fairly keen and experienced cyclist, it seems) fair ripped it apart - and rightly so, IMHO.

I confess myself baffled though. I know that a lot of the BBC (OKA the Biased Broadcasting Corporation) material has to be treated with circumspection on several well-defined subjects/issues where they seem to have to maintain their religio-political ideology and leanings - but cycling?    tellme
Anyway, it had certainly taken me in. Gullible, I suppose. The thing is, I just hadn't thought to question the truth of it. I mean, why should I ? Why on earth would one need to suspect that the BBC might lie about something so banal, and that they might try to get you all alarmed and wound-up about it in the process, and with such a deliberately fabricated story - and then lie about it when questioned by a journalist?    tellme

Gullible, that is, until I read the Guardian post: BBC's War on Britain's Roads: even more fake than we feared
(Copied below sans embedded hyperlinks/images, with my emphasis.)
The only things perhaps more surprising about the revelation of yet another fake BBC documentary (e.g., as QED in the polar bears documentary), were:
  • (a) that the Guardian seemed to have actually done a piece of investigative journalism. Though admittedly it is not mainstream news stuff, I can't recall when I last (if ever) heard/saw that the Grundian had done a piece of investigative journalism.
  • (b) that the Guardian had actually been critical of the BBC over this matter. The BBC and the Guardian had always previously seemed to have been joined at the hip - at least, as far as religio-political ideology and spin went.

Still, this has left me and my mates at the cycling club more than a little annoyed with the BBC.
You see, we exiled poms get annoyed, but can accept that the beeb's religio-political ideology led to, for example:
  • the beeb determining in 2007 a policy, QED per their 28Gate documented conference, (refer Twenty-EightGate - The BBC's latest scandal) that they would maintain a bias in favour of CAGW (Catastrophic Anthropogenic Global Warming) airtime, and deliberately give correspondingly minimal airtime to skeptical views/science.
  • the beeb dumping the brilliant broadcaster and naturalist Prof. David Bellamy (we all still miss his programmes) because - QED per Bellamy - he solidly refuted the scientific basis of the theory of AGW and alarmism of CAGW.
  • the beeb keeping the marvellous Sir David Attenborough on because he apparently toed the party line in this regard. For example, I notice that he never gets into a position where he has to concede that something is attributable to AGW/CAGW, but neatly sidesteps the issue altogether by merely agreeing affably when some talking head explains to him why it is so. (I saw him doing this with the "Hockey Stick" a few months back. He was superb.)
  • the beeb's (QED) employing and apparently protecting, covering up and promoting - if not deliberately encouraging - someone who was apparently a known paedophile/child molester/rapist (take your pick) from the '60s onwards (Le So Vile), and the deliberate concealment of this from authorities. I think the sick ideological rationale here was along the lines of "consensual sex with children is OK", but then I read that some people involved/associated suggest that it was probably fuelled by money for procuring children for the rich elite. The mind boggles.
  • the beeb's deliberate broadcasting of despicable, fake and unverified "war" footage (QED) - photos and video - from Palestine, depicting individuals ostensibly injured by Israeli return fire in retaliation for Hamas rocket attacks - the injured being caught in later footage apparently miraculously recovered and with no injuries from their mortal wounds. Plus one tragic scene during the recent Hamas rocket attack on Israel, of a service for a little Palestinian girl who had ostensibly been killed by Israeli return fire. It turned out later that she had been killed by a Hamas rocket exploding on launch. How could that be? Because Hamas has a strategy (QED) of deliberately using civilians as a protective shield and deploying its rocket-launchers embedded in domestic suburbs. (A war crime.)

You might ask: So what is annoying about all that? What's wrong with a bit (or a lot) of bias and ideology, if it is "for the greater good", or something?
Well, aside from the absurdity and "wrongness" of it all - on many levels - the British taxpayer is obliged by law to fund the BBC - it's a tax, you see. So the taxpayers are paying the BBC to do all that, and more - and the BBC pay themselves most handsomely from the tax revenue. They don't actually have to work to do anything the taxpayers want. Oh no, nothing so sordid as that. They get paid regardless.

But that's not necessarily the real issue here. The above pales into insignificance compared to what they have just now done.
No. What has got us so all-riled-up about it at the cycling club is not just the above (which admittedly is bad enough as it is), but the fact that the BBC have compounded it multifold by taking their vile fakery and propaganda into the domain of British cycling.
Is nothing sacred?
This time, they have gone too far. It is quite unacceptable. There should now properly be a Royal Commission of Enquiry on the matter.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 12:19:23 AM by IainB » Logged
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