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Last post Author Topic: Visual Basic or Visual C++  (Read 8498 times)

jgpaiva

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Re: Visual Basic or Visual C++
« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2012, 06:26:25 PM »
Guys, I think that this thread has entered a recurrent discussion on "what's the best programming language". For
Here are other variants of this discussion here on DC [there are probably lots others]:
The Best Introductory Language
What language is the best for a new programmer to start with?
Seeking Programming Language To Learn
What's the Best Scripting Language?

My university teaches Schemew, which I do not recommend, since it's not that useful from a practical point of view. From what I know, most other universities here (in Portugal) start with some managed language, such as Scheme, Pythonw or Camlw. However, AFAIK, ALL of them teach C, C++, C# and Java somewhere along the line (some more than others, though).
Personally, I believe it's simpler to start by a managed language; when one starts programming, there are enough troubles even if one doesn't have to deal with memory problems. I believe Python sounds like a very good option, mostly due to its "batteries included" philosophy, which means the language includes constructs for building lots of stuff out of the box, and due to its good interaction with other languages. IIRC, there's also ways to pack the runtime into an executable, so it can also create executables (even though I've never tried it). As someone who has moved from Windows to Mac (don't ask, sad story), I also recognize the fact that it's cross-platform as a big bonus. However, if you intend to do anything that takes lots of calculations (which from what you describe, you don't), C/C++, C# or Java would surely be better options, from my experience (which is not a lot, I'm a newbie at python and my troubles may very well have been created by lack of knowledge, so YMMV :P ).

Without understanding better what you intend to do, it's a bit hard to actually give you recommendations. If you intend to be working for a third party, then, as db90h has shown, C/C++ is a more widely used language which may improve your chances of being hired; IMO, every professional programmer should know C/C++, it's a basic requirement. On the other hand, if you just want to learn something to play with, I personally wouldn't start with C/C++ since it'll take longer to learn and build stuff, even though it may be more rewarding if you intend to pursue a career in the field.

db90h

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Re: Visual Basic or Visual C++
« Reply #26 on: July 08, 2012, 06:48:21 PM »
+1 jgpaiva

EDIT: I never MEANT to get involved with this thread, I just took issue with the idea that C was akin to COBOL these days... that's just not the case. The 'chart of commits' from that random project hosting site that was cited showed almost no C commits, as if it were 'dead'. So, that's what I took issue with. It's far from dead, as you can see. Heck, *whatever you are reading this thread with* is written in C or C++. The browser and OS, no matter what platform. Now, if iOS, it *might* be Objective C, but for now let's just call C/C++/Objective C the same 'family'.

As I've said repeatedly, the most important thing is that you select the language that works best for your task, and for YOU. For instance, since I don't do much C#, I could probably create a native C++ GUI faster than a C# GUI, even though it is much easier to create GUI in C# with Visual Studio. So, for me, C++ is a great thing to use, even if that means I sometimes must work a little harder. It also does continue to offer to most superior performance to any other language, if that is an issue for YOUR application. Likewise, it is USELESS for Web 2.0 stuff, so obviously not even a choice there.

MANY languages have their syntax derived from C, and so by learning C, you not only learn C, but also can easily pick up lots of other languages. PHP, for instance, has a C like syntax... though also supports other syntaxes, which makes it super easy to pick up on, one of its advantages.

I also recommend all students study assembly language (x86, ARM, doesn't matter).. any assembly language, just so you understand how native code gets compiled and executed by the processor. Then, you can understand disassemblies. Assembly language, in contrast to its reputation, is actually more SIMPLE than any other language. That simplicity means it is harder to actually do things WITH though.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 08:35:34 PM by db90h »

wraith808

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Re: Visual Basic or Visual C++
« Reply #27 on: July 09, 2012, 01:36:59 PM »
Whether they teach it in universities these days, I dunno - but I'd hope so.

My BIL is in college right now, and had to take one course in C/C++.  One.  From there, it was on to Java world.  Admittedly, that's what he's studying, but... yeah.  One course doesn't even really count.  Then again, several years ago, I only took 1 also, so...  

Most of my experience with C++/C is self-taught and on the job, not that I have ever used anything from college anyway...

jgpaiva

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Re: Visual Basic or Visual C++
« Reply #28 on: July 09, 2012, 06:12:12 PM »
not that I have ever used anything from college anyway
;D ;D ;D

db90h

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Re: Visual Basic or Visual C++
« Reply #29 on: July 09, 2012, 06:23:57 PM »
LOL, I must admit this:

1. I was a programmer long before I went to college, authoring shareware BBS tools in x86 assembly and C.
2. When I went to college I didn't *think* it helped me at all.
3. LATER, YEARS LATER, little things like exposure to areas I didn't naturally encounter I later became thankful for.

In other words, it helped me more than I realized - to 'round out' my education. Just knowing an algorithm exists, or OS fundamentals, ... just that exposure to things *different* is what helped.

As for learning particular language X, Y, or Z... nah, useless. My biggest is fear is Microsoft controlling too much of our universities with subsidies. I, for one, had far too little Linux or OS X exposure, for instance.. everything was Microsoft. Later, I got into embedded Linux, than 'regular' Linux more ... but never have gotten into OS X much. I wonder if the story would be different if Apple or Google subsidized the universities instead of Microsoft. Google may - these days. Apple may as well, as at that time they were near bankrupt.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2012, 06:46:23 PM by db90h »

berry

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Re: Visual Basic or Visual C++
« Reply #30 on: July 13, 2012, 10:38:20 AM »
Not attempting to enter into best or most popular or whatever, but if you're interested in what's being taught, most universities (at least in the states) post their curriculum on-line.

cheers