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Last post Author Topic: Raspberry Pi's $35 Linux PC  (Read 59415 times)

wraith808

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Re: Raspberry Pi's $35 Linux PC
« Reply #150 on: March 29, 2016, 02:38:35 PM »
I'd be surprised if anybody is going to let you drop a device into their internal LAN.

Back when I had the tolerance for stress to work on these, the client just wanted to be up, now.  I think it just depends on the type of client we're discussing.  If they're clients that outsource their IT, they won't know nor care- and I know this from personal experience.

Deozaan

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Re: Raspberry Pi's $35 Linux PC
« Reply #151 on: March 29, 2016, 06:46:24 PM »
Review: Odroid C2, Raspberry Pi 3, and Orange Pi+ compared

tl;dr: The ODROID-C2 is a very solid competitor to the Raspberry Pi model 3 B, and is anywhere from 2-10x faster than the Pi 3, depending on the operation. The software and community support is nowhere near what you get with the Raspberry Pi, but it's the best I've seen of all the Raspberry Pi clones I've tried


Stoic Joker

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Re: Raspberry Pi's $35 Linux PC
« Reply #152 on: March 30, 2016, 06:26:42 AM »
I'd be surprised if anybody is going to let you drop a device into their internal LAN.

Back when I had the tolerance for stress to work on these, the client just wanted to be up, now.  I think it just depends on the type of client we're discussing.  If they're clients that outsource their IT, they won't know nor care- and I know this from personal experience.


That would be more the type we're discussing. Also these are MSP contract customers that want/need us to monitor various pieces of equipment on their network. We already have a strictly software based solution that we're using, but it needs to be on a machine that is always on so it can do its data collection and reporting. However (SOHO/SMB) users being users, they're continually shutting down, crashing, or infecting the machine in question - not to mention the software in question is a bit finicky - causing us to have to chase down why network X isn't reporting anymore. Because a data set that's more than 8 hours old...is useless.

So I'm looking to create a small, clean, stable environment that it can run from to keep both sides happy and trouble free.

The level of interaction with the client network is actually very low -(SNMP only - at my insistence)- but it needs to be for us to effectively maintain the level of service that we're offering.