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Author Topic: Raspberry Pi's $35 Linux PC  (Read 34271 times)
Arizona Hot
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« on: June 14, 2012, 12:32:15 PM »

Will the nostalgia of playing with now antediluvian technology (see Things your kids will never know - old school tech! ) make the Raspberry Pi a sucess?
Another nostalgia article?
  
« Last Edit: June 14, 2012, 12:42:35 PM by Arizona Hot » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2012, 12:59:57 PM »

Ummm... I'll take 2? tongue

At that price... sheesh... You cannot go wrong.

EDIT:

Odd... Page won't load for me... http://www.raspberrypi.org/ seems down for me (and just me)... Sad

EDIT 2:

Well, can't buy it, but registered interest.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2012, 01:18:48 PM by Renegade » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2012, 07:38:13 PM »

 Grin  These have been on back order for months. 

I think I ordered mine in Feb.  It's due to arrive this month.   One of the guys @ work had his in the office the other day.  It was running XBMC.  Pretty neat.  Wink

 Thmbsup
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Carol Haynes
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« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2012, 08:27:23 PM »

Got mine - it is picky about USB devices. Can't get a wireless keyboard/mouse combo to work (even with a powered hub) - had to buy a cheap no-frills USB keyboard and mouse.

If you haven't got all the bits you need then you find it isn't as cheap as you thought.

Note it comes uncased (they are going to supply cases shortly if you want one) - so you have a bare board sitting on your table and getting hot!

You need:

HDMI or yellow-phono video capable monitor (HDMI carries audio too so an HD TV Is a good option)
Monitor/TV cable
USB mouse and keyboard (you may have more luck than me but it didn't like the cheapest MS Wireless Desktop set I could buy - deliberately bought this to limit the number of USB sockets required!)
Ethernet cable (also required to set the clock correctly as no BIOS or RTC battery)
If you aren't using an HDMI monitor/TV with speakers then you need speakers or headphones with jack lead.
Fast SD card (ideally class 10 to load with a Linux image - this is the main drive so you need the fastest you can get otherwise it is VERY slow)
Power supply (you need something like a Blackberry charger with a mini-USB connector). You can't power it from a USB socket on your computer!

If you want additional storage an external USB hard disk (in which case you also need a powered USB hub as there are only two USB sockets)

Note there are Linux images available from Raspberry Pi website. The recommend one (a Debian Linux) is not overly impressive out of the box. Very few apps preinstalled - mostly educational programming apps without manuals. One is included and if you want the manual you have to buy it from the developer! Also painfully slow (even with a class 10 card) - so much so that the browser included (Midori) frequently times out loading pages.

Not sure what apps can be installed without needing to be recompiled because it is ARM based.

All in all it is a bit of fun - but actually not that cheap if you have to kit it out (if you have a junk cupboard full of suitable bits you are OK), and performance is a bit underwhelming.

Given that there are a number of similar projects on the threshold I think I wish I had waited to see how it all shakes out.
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« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2012, 08:36:55 PM »

Well, can't buy it, but registered interest.

You can also register at RS Components (Australia), it'll be AU$41 delivered, cheaper than Element 14 - (formerly Farnell and the 14th element is Silicon in case you're wondering smiley ).

The queue must be mighty long, I registered a while ago and so far they've invited two lots of 4000 to order.....and I wasn't one of them.
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« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2012, 11:23:34 PM »

Well, can't buy it, but registered interest.

You can also register at RS Components (Australia), it'll be AU$41 delivered, cheaper than Element 14 - (formerly Farnell and the 14th element is Silicon in case you're wondering smiley ).

The queue must be mighty long, I registered a while ago and so far they've invited two lots of 4000 to order.....and I wasn't one of them.

Great! Thanks for the heads up there! I was rushing through things and didn't check for that.
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4wd
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« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2012, 07:59:16 PM »

I think I might have a small wait on my hands Sad

Quote
Your Raspberry Pi Id number is 244205

Or I could get one from ebay.....

Quote
Only selling as I don't have time for the project I intended to use it for.
Quote
I ordered 2 of these with hopes to use them together for a project but I am no longer going that route.
Quote
I don't really have a need for it...

Yeah, right....

 Angry
« Last Edit: June 16, 2012, 09:15:50 PM by 4wd » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2012, 10:27:00 PM »

Quote
Bought a few to scalp on ebay. Pay up or wait months.

3x the price? Good grief!
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40hz
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« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2012, 05:17:48 PM »

Don't know if anyone cares, but the Rasberry Pi community has their own monthly e-magazine. Called The MagPi, it's now up to the second issue and may be downloaded here.


Quote
The MagPi: a Raspberry Pi community magazine
Posted on May 5, 2012 by liz   

Whenever I’m tasked with chatting up potential donors, partners or volunteers for the Raspberry Pi project, I’m asked what really makes us stand out from other computer companies. There are lots of answers: the charity business model; the unusual price point we’ve picked; the open-source software; the transparency about process; the focus on education.

But for me, what I consider the biggest thing we have going for us, and the thing I tend to rattle on about most in meetings, is the community that’s grown around the project. The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives). So go and download a copy, have a flick through, write to the guys if you think you can contribute to future issues, and let us know what you think!

 Cool Thmbsup
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« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2012, 10:51:03 PM »

Don't know if anyone cares, but the Rasberry Pi community has their own monthly e-magazine. Called The MagPi, it's now up to the second issue and may be downloaded here.

This is only looking better and better! Thanks for the heads up!
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4wd
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« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2012, 05:06:25 AM »

Your Raspberry Pi Id number is 244205

Woohoo!  I'll get to order at the end of the week!!!   ...and then I get to wait..... Sad

Registration date recorded betweenEstimated Invited to order dateEstimated shipping lead-time*
6th March - 12th MarchTuesday 19 June9 weeks
13th March - 21st MarchWednesday 20 June10 weeks
22nd March - 5th AprilThursday 21 June11 weeks
6th April - 16 AprilFriday 22 June11 weeks
17th April - 25 AprilMonday 25 June12 weeks
26th April - 8th MayTuesday 26 June12 weeks
9th May - 23rd MayWednesday 27 June13 weeks
24th May - 7th JuneThursday 28 June14 weeks
8th June onwardsFriday 29 June14 weeks
             
RS Components Australia Raspberry Pi FAQ

Not even worth buying an extra one to extort more money from Renegade since he's would arrive three weeks later anyway  tongue
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« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2012, 06:18:23 AM »

Not even worth buying an extra one to extort more money from Renegade since he's would arrive three weeks later anyway  tongue

Was that going to be $10 a week? smiley

I would have registered a while back if I knew that they were this hard to get. Yikes. I figured that I would be able to just go out and get one whenever I felt like. But this works too -- gives me some time to contemplate what wonderful things I'll accomplish with it~! cheesy
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40hz
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« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2012, 08:00:18 AM »

Something just occurred to me. Those of you who have been around long enough to have witnessed the birth of the "personal computer" (Kim1, IMSAI, etc.) and lived through it's early childhood (VIC-20, C-64, Atari 800, Coleco Adam, TRS-80, Apple ][ at al) might notice a similarity between then, and what's happening now with the Rasberry Pi.

You're seeing a creative community of enthusiasts forming around a piece of inexpensive and empowering technology. And this community is open to new ideas and freely sharing discoveries with each other.

Looks like the "good old days" of the personal computing movement are making a comeback.

Funny how Apple and Microsoft got their start in a time when there was a huge interest in getting control over your personal technology. Bill Gates, Paul Allen, Steve Jobs and The Woz launched two of the most successful companies in history - and ushered in a whole new world (both figuratively and literally) - in rebellion against IBM and other computing giants who were committed to preserving their secretive and proprietary walled-garden ecosystems.

Things have changed a lot since 1975. And one of the most notable changes is that the former 'rebels' are now doing their damnedest to become our new overlords.

How interesting that a new small, inexpensive, single-board computer has emerged, along with it's own community, in response.

Apparently history is repeating itself - once again.

How cool is that?

 Cool Thmbsup

----------------------------------

Addendum:

Back in the day, I was firmly ensconced in the Commodore Camp with my trusty Vic-20, my stable of C-64s and my elegant C-128. Our holy book was a Canadian-based enthusiast's magazine called Transacter. It started out in 1978 as a few page newsletter. But it became a legitimate printed bi-monthly magazine sold on bookstore racks and the bigger news stands before its demise in 1989.

Since there were no websites back then, it was eagerly awaited by the Commodore community whenever it came out. The B&N around where I live used to have a sign that read: "ATTENTION! Transacter magazine is put out as soon as we receive it. If you don't see it, it either hasn't arrived, or it's sold out. And no - we won't be receiving additional copies."

The full Transacter archive in PDF can be found here. If you're curious, take a look at a few issues and compare what you see there to what's happening with MagPi magazine.

Of course, if you still have an old C64 sitting somewhere, you could always plug it in (I can almost guarantee it still works), download a few copies of Transacter, and have at it. Well worth it too! That old C64 sprite and SID chip magic is still there.
 smiley Thmbsup
« Last Edit: June 19, 2012, 08:53:08 AM by 40hz » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2012, 12:07:48 PM »

Some proposed, 2012, and available PC boards:
Raspberry Pi; BeagleBoard-xM; BeagleBone; PandaBoard ES; Cotton Candy; Ninja Blocks; NUC Intel; VIA (APC/Android 8750 PC); Gooseberry; Olimex (A13-OLinuXino); Maple Board (LeafLabs); Arduino; gumstick (gumstix).
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« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2012, 02:47:26 PM »

Some proposed, 2012, and available PC boards:
Raspberry Pi; BeagleBoard-xM; BeagleBone; PandaBoard ES; Cotton Candy; Ninja Blocks; NUC Intel; VIA (APC/Android 8750 PC); Gooseberry; Olimex (A13-OLinuXino); Maple Board (LeafLabs); Arduino; gumstick (gumstix).

Raspberry Pi; $35
BeagleBoard-xM; $79
BeagleBone; $??
PandaBoard ES; $182
Cotton Candy; $??
Ninja Blocks; $??
NUC Intel; $400
VIA (APC/Android 8750 PC); $49
Gooseberry; $??
Olimex (A13-OLinuXino); $??
Maple Board (LeafLabs); $35
Arduino; $19 (huh?)
gumstick (gumstix) $149+
 

Quite a range out there. The $19 board freaks me out. But, there are lots of options.

Does anyone know much about this stuff? I'd like to give it a shot with some software ideas, but the options are a tad freaky now with so many....
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« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2012, 06:22:50 PM »

Quote
Does anyone know much about this stuff? I'd like to give it a shot with some software ideas, but the options are a tad freaky now with so many....

@Renegade - Arduino is already established and well beyond the curiosity/novelty stage. Not a bad choice if you're looking to develop something that has an active audience. You can also think outside the box with this puppy. Some musical instruments are out there that use Arduino for their base hardware. Ditto for some audio realtime processing uses.

Might be a natural for you since you're into music apps already. Just a thought... Wink

 Cool Thmbsup
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« Reply #16 on: June 21, 2012, 04:46:15 AM »

Melbourne's The Age newspaper today:

[3.3MB]



Also, this article from May 21, 2012.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2012, 04:59:35 AM by 4wd » Logged

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« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2012, 05:26:45 AM »

Quote
Does anyone know much about this stuff? I'd like to give it a shot with some software ideas, but the options are a tad freaky now with so many....

@Renegade - Arduino is already established and well beyond the curiosity/novelty stage. Not a bad choice if you're looking to develop something that has an active audience. You can also think outside the box with this puppy. Some musical instruments are out there that use Arduino for their base hardware. Ditto for some audio realtime processing uses.

Might be a natural for you since you're into music apps already. Just a thought... Wink

 Cool Thmbsup

Exactly~! Thanks~! cheesy That's the perfect jump point for me to focus research on. (I hate chasing down a million different products -- better to start with some advice and a bit of focus!)
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« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2012, 06:07:37 AM »

Quote
Does anyone know much about this stuff? I'd like to give it a shot with some software ideas, but the options are a tad freaky now with so many....

@Renegade - Arduino is already established and well beyond the curiosity/novelty stage. Not a bad choice if you're looking to develop something that has an active audience. You can also think outside the box with this puppy. Some musical instruments are out there that use Arduino for their base hardware. Ditto for some audio realtime processing uses.

Might be a natural for you since you're into music apps already. Just a thought... Wink

 Cool Thmbsup

Exactly~! Thanks~! cheesy That's the perfect jump point for me to focus research on. (I hate chasing down a million different products -- better to start with some advice and a bit of focus!)

Well, having looked some more, it's not quite what I want to work with. I'm really looking to work with an OS already there so I have a solid set of tools to work with, rather than having to go and code them all from scratch. I just don't have the time, unfortunately. I'd love to do it, but... time...

Any suggestions for one that runs Linux? That would be perfect. Or even Windows... though not really too hot on that idea as I don't really want to pay licensing fees like that.
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« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2012, 07:55:51 AM »

Just to very briefly risk risk going semi-off topic, there's two interesting articles over on the Phoronix website detailing the construction of a 12-core and a 96-core ARM cluster using inexpensive Pandaboard singleboard computers and Ubuntu. I think it serves as real world proof of just how much can be done with these little computers and an open operating system. Like famous burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee allegedly said: "It ain't how much you got. It's how you use it."

And lest we be too jaded, the 96-core cluster not only draws a relatively paltry 200 watts for the entire works - but the techno-wonks responsible for it decided to run it off a solar panel. Small surprise it's MIT where this is all happening, right?

Note: Using an industrial trashcan as the server rack was inspired AFAIC.  Evil (The 12-core used a wooden dish drying rack.)



Quote
Last week I shared results from the Phoronix 12-core ARM Linux mini cluster that was constructed out of six PandaBoard ES development boards. Over the weekend, a 96-core ARM cluster succeeded this build. While packing nearly 100 cores and running Ubuntu Linux, the power consumption was just a bit more than 200 Watts. This array of nearly 100 processor cores was even powered up by a solar panel.

This past weekend I was out at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where this build took place. A massive ARM build out has been in the plans for a few months and to even get it running off a solar panel. The build was a success and by Sunday, the goals were realized.

Here's the links for the 12-core and 96-core articles if anybody's interested.

So... is Linux "just a hobby" as another forum thread recently asked?

Cool


« Last Edit: June 21, 2012, 08:12:25 AM by 40hz » Logged

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« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2012, 10:30:55 AM »

96 core array sounds like fun ;-)

Anyone remember OCCAM (programming language) - sounds like it might be useful again!

Now all we need is some Linux software to take advantage of that amount of horsepower!
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« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2012, 11:40:55 AM »

Things have changed a lot since 1975. And one of the most notable changes is that the former 'rebels' are now doing their damnedest to become our new overlords.

Ummm... Apple was doing the same thing back then, i.e. Franklin Ace, Laser, and other clones.  They did it again in the 90s.  This is just part for the course for them... they never were truly rebels.
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« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2012, 11:47:05 AM »

Anyone remember OCCAM (programming language) - sounds like it might be useful again!

I do,I do!!!!

Nicholas Wirth's magnum opus. I never got my head completely around it. Probably because I can't walk and chew gum at the same time. Modula-2 and Modula-3 are another story. I still thought that Modula was one of the finest general programming languages ever created. And the only one (other than FORTH) I was ever really comfortable using now that I think about it.

Quote
Now all we need is some Linux software to take advantage of that amount of horsepower!

There's quite a bit actually. A lot of Blender and other enthusiasts have built their own personal render farms for ray tracing, CGI, and 3D modeling. In the professional world it's a given to own a render farm. A Google search will spot you plenty of choices. One of my clients uses a commercial package called Deadline running under CentOS to handle their rendering admin, mainly because it has out-of-box support for over 20 of the big 3D apps such as Maya, Blender, 3ds MAX, etc. You can get a free 2-node copy here if you're curious or have an immediate use for this sort of thing. (I certainly don't. <*grin*> ) Deadline gets a little expensive once you go beyond that however. There's also equivalent freebies and other open source packages (and how-tos) out there if you look for them.

 Cool

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« Reply #23 on: June 21, 2012, 11:56:02 AM »

Things have changed a lot since 1975. And one of the most notable changes is that the former 'rebels' are now doing their damnedest to become our new overlords.

Ummm... Apple was doing the same thing back then, i.e. Franklin Ace, Laser, and other clones.  They did it again in the 90s.  This is just part for the course for them... they never were truly rebels.

Excellent point although that was primarily Apple busting down on the clones for duplicating their ROM chips. Not reverse engineering (at least at first) either. They were reading out the chips and then reburning them IIRC. But Apple has gone way beyond that with their current legal arguments because they're now claiming ownership of paradigms and raw concepts - most of which weren't their inventions or discoveries to begin with.

And true, also that Jobs never really was. Woz maybe. But he got double-shuffled out of the picture once Jobs gathered a bunch of brilliant software and hardware people together to create the Macintosh - and then claimed the whole thing as his own personal invention.

What I find  amazing is that nobody ever really seriously called him out on that. And now, it's generally accepted "fact" that Steve Jobs created the Macintosh.

Love it! (not)  undecided

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« Reply #24 on: June 21, 2012, 11:57:09 AM »

[Continuing the aside}

Blimey I had completely forgotten about Modular! A blast from the past - and yes it was a great Pascal-like language.

I do remember having fun with Forth - though it seems less like high level programming and more like a cross between a Mensa logic puzzle and assembly language!
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