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Author Topic: Norton Identity Safe -- Free Download  (Read 9318 times)
IainB
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« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2012, 03:03:13 AM »

Just updated my post above with this:
...It is all quite thought-provoking.
Copied here is section 10 of the agreement (from OCR of image):
In the doco somewhere it also says that it uses your unique CPU ID, or something, to hash/encrypt data.
NIS is your Friend...     ohmy
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tomos
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« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2012, 03:45:48 AM »

Odd what you say about MSE - it has never seemed to slow down any of the 6 PCs I have installed it on. It seems to behave unobtrusively and seems quite fast.

I'm unhappy with it lately - it's slowing down things here a lot more than it used to (with no obvious reason).
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Tom
Carol Haynes
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« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2012, 06:15:41 AM »

Interesting - I don't find MSE has any discernible impact on my system.

I was at a clients yesterday with a very slow computer. They had a current Norton subscription and so I swapped them to MSE and the speed up was very noticeable even without any other cleaning. Horses for courses I suppose.

Being cynical I suspect your original Norton removal wasn't complete (it rarely is IME of Norton even though they assure you it is) and interfered with MSE (wouldn't be at all surprised if that was deliberate). That's why I always use not only the normal uninstall routine but then use the Norton Removal tool to make sure it has all gone. (Interesting to note that Norton provide such a tool for uninstall issues - even for their latest versions).

I do the same with MacAfee - saw a computer a while ago that was slow and had some connectivity issues and had for some time. Turns out they had uninstalled MacAfee about 18 months earlier (apparently successfully) but there were still bits of the old firewall interfering with the connection speed which the MAcAfee Removal Tool got rid of and there was an instant system speed up and totally stable internet connection.
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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2012, 06:43:28 AM »

Being cynical I suspect your original Norton removal wasn't complete (it rarely is IME of Norton even though they assure you it is) and interfered with MSE (wouldn't be at all surprised if that was deliberate). That's why I always use not only the normal uninstall routine but then use the Norton Removal tool to make sure it has all gone. (Interesting to note that Norton provide such a tool for uninstall issues - even for their latest versions).

+1 In a choice between NIS and a root kit ... I'd sooner trust the root kit. As at least they're highly optimized and have clear agendas.
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IainB
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« Reply #29 on: June 01, 2012, 09:52:02 AM »

...In a choice between NIS and a root kit ... I'd sooner trust the root kit. As at least they're highly optimized and have clear agendas.
Har-de-har-har. Very droll. Cynical and apposite.    Wink
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Curt
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« Reply #30 on: June 01, 2012, 10:45:12 AM »

Norton AV 2012 is $40 in USA, but more than double up here in DenmarkSad

-----

@IainB - really fine OCR-job! How much did you after-edit manually? If only a little or nothing, I would really want to know the name of your OCR program!

------

Quote from: Norton Identity Safe
Download by October 1, 2012 and enjoy it FREE of charge forever

-it could just mean "lifetime key" => "for the rest of version 2012's life".
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IainB
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« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2012, 12:32:37 AM »

...@IainB - really fine OCR-job! How much did you after-edit manually? If only a little or nothing, I would really want to know the name of your OCR program!
Quote from: Norton Identity Safe
Download by October 1, 2012 and enjoy it FREE of charge forever
-it could just mean "lifetime key" => "for the rest of version 2012's life".

The OCR was done by MS OneNote. It seems to be a particularly good OCR tool - usually does a very good job of OCR, and with few errors - but that would always depend on the quality of the image being scanned.
Quote
How I did the text extraction:
The text of the agreement came up in a small scrollable, non-stretchable window at install time (you had to accept it before it would proceed with the installation). The text in the window was non-selectable (maybe an image?), so I paused at that point and hunted around for a separate text file of the agreement on Norton's NIS webpages. When I couldn't find one, I skeptically supposed that Norton would have deliberately made it difficult for the user to retrieve the agreement, for a reason, and that I might not see this agreement again unless I reinstalled NIS. Most of it was the usual legal "all care and no responsibility" sort of stuff, so I decided to only capture what seemed to be the most convoluted and interesting part - section 10.
So I took a screen capture of each sequential piece of text in the window, using the OneNote screen clipping tool - it came to 6 and a bit clips, all told. I arranged them all in the LH column of a two-column table in OneNote, then right clicked each image, selected Copy Text from Picture (which puts the OCR'd text to Clipboard), and pasted the text into the corresponding slot in the RH column of the table.
When I reviewed the OCR'd text I was surprised at the high quality, but figured that that would be attributable to the clarity of the clip. I started corrections (e.g., some lower case characters had scanned as upper case, a "/" had scanned as a "|") and then stopped as I realised that I had made 6 or so and they all seemed to be minor, so I was probably being too fussy - the thing read OK without needing any more corrections.

I didn't need to extract the text for my own purposes - it was just that I thought the text would be of more use to the DC forum readers than an image, and it would be copyable and searchable.
(The reason I didn't need to extract the text in OneNote in the first place was because I have set OneNote to automatically search inside all images for any relevant embedded text when you search for something. I think it is indexed. You can always extract the text - as above - as and when you might need to copy it. From experience, that searching of embedded text in images works with high accuracy.)

Back to that agreement section 10: it generally seems to be suggesting that you accept that you may have absolutely no privacy of your information and that Norton could do what the heck they wanted with your:
  • IP address.
  • MAC addess.
  • Machine ID.
  • IMEI.
  • Data.

As for the meaning of "lifetime", I suspect it may have been deliberately left ambiguous and open to interpretation. I certainly could never recommend that a client enter into such an agreement, and I wouldn't do it myself either. I'm not even sure the agreement would necessarily be legal in all countries. It will be interesting to see how many people actually fall for what looks like Norton's super-free offer to taking your privacy away for your lifetime use of the product. Who knows but that they may even intend to sell the data to certain government agencies?
I think the military-grade encryption-at-source approach - e.g., including (say) disk encryption, Wuala, X-Marks, or LastPass - would arguably be the most advisable and secure route to take for the medium/long term.
Quote
"NIS is your friend."
Yeah, right.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 01:58:48 AM by IainB; Reason: Minor corrections. » Logged
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