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Author Topic: Lucid enables high-end gaming on low-end systems  (Read 1044 times)

40hz

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Lucid enables high-end gaming on low-end systems
« on: April 11, 2012, 07:34:13 PM »
Ok...I know I'm currently on hiatus from active web participation. But this bit of tech news was just too interesting not to share with DC.

From the good folks over at TechEye.net

Quote
Lucid enables high-end gaming on low-end systems
Giving Intel HD graphics a shake
23 Mar 2012 17:19 | by Paul Taylor in Lisbon


The inventors of the groundbreaking, albeit deceased, mixed-brand multiGPU chip, Hydra Engine, have decided to break the mould once again and enable high-end gaming on low-end graphics cards.

Lucid Logix has over time become a 100 percent software-driven company, releasing several new software apps specifically targeting the optimisation of Intel GPU performance. Virtu technology, for one, is implemented by some motherboard manufacturers and aimed at combining the best features of Intel’s Sandy Bridge GPU with discrete GPUs.

Now the company has launched DynamiX. With this utility the company claims it can get some serious gaming going on, on your Intel HD 2000-based graphics core. This is actually aimed at enabling gaming on mainstream notebooks without having to resort to discrete graphics from Nvidia or AMD. Dynamix is a software utility that gives a computer with Intel HD 2000-class graphics the ability to adjust the in-game graphics settings on the fly by setting a framerate threshold. If the frames fall, the software kicks in and scales back in-game detail, smoothing out your framerate immediately.

“With DynamiX, a single embedded GPU is all you will need to enjoy your favorite high-performance titles on most new notebooks without reducing display resolution or minimizing game performance settings,” said Offir Remez, Lucid co-founder and president.
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Interesting....

Read the rest of the article here.

(And now I'm heading back to my monk's cell. Ciao! ) :Thmbsup:

Deozaan

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Re: Lucid enables high-end gaming on low-end systems
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2012, 10:43:49 PM »
I can't find the article at the links you gave.

EDIT: Here it is: http://news.techeye....g-on-low-end-systems


TaoPhoenix

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Re: Lucid enables high-end gaming on low-end systems
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2012, 12:27:39 AM »
"As there is no such thing as a free lunch, the software has been cut-down for demo purposes and will only work with Bethesda Studios’ high-fantasy romp The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. Lucid will later charge an as-of-yet undetermined fee for the full software but pricing, we believe, will depend on consumer reactions and the supported game list, which, according to the company, will grow over time."

So it also only works for games, apparently not other graphics uses, so that's a pity.

vlastimil

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Re: Lucid enables high-end gaming on low-end systems
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2012, 07:38:53 AM »
After skimming through the article, it seems like they want to monitor frame rates and adjust the graphic options of the game on the fly. So, it can only work if the game is designed with low-end graphic chip in mind, interfaces with lucid's library and can quickly turn on and off the GPU-intensive features. I certainly would not call this "high-end" gaming or a "groundbreaking invention", but a "auto-configuration of graphic options for games" is not a newsworthy title.

It is neat though. No more fiddling with the graphic setting of a game. I am a big fan of a configuration-less applications  :up: