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OpalCalc 1.43

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cranioscopical:
Hmmm.. is putting USD before the number very common in the US or other countries?
-Twinbee (April 05, 2015, 09:39 AM)
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It's not uncommon in Canada.

''There are various common abbreviations to distinguish the Canadian dollar from others: while the ISO currency code CAD (a three-character code without monetary symbols) is common, no single system is universally accepted. C$ is recommended by the Canadian government (e.g., per The Canadian Style guide) and is used by the International Monetary Fund, while Editing Canadian English indicates Can$ and CDN$; both guides note the ISO scheme/code. The abbreviation CA$ is also used, e.g., in some software packages.''
(Taken from here.)
 

 

Renegade:
Hmmm.. is putting USD before the number very common in the US or other countries?
-Twinbee (April 05, 2015, 09:39 AM)
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Currency symbols are a nightmare across different publications/industries. Standards are all over the place. Here are some common ways that you will see in different places. I'll stick to USD for the examples.

$US100
US$100
$US 100
US$ 100
US $100
USD 100
100 USD
USD $100
$100 USD

Normally, I would recommend using one of the following:

USD 100
USD $100
100 USD
$100 USD

My preference there is (usually) for the top 2, though I prefer the bottom 2 for less formal usage. The top 2 are generally nicer to use with decimal places. e.g. USD $123.45.

The 3-character ISO scheme is the easiest to use. Using the actual symbols is a good idea as well when writing, though in OpalCalc I'd imagine that it wouldn't be needed as typing currency symbols can be difficult.

''There are various common abbreviations to distinguish the Canadian dollar from others: while the ISO currency code CAD (a three-character code without monetary symbols) is common, no single system is universally accepted.
-cranioscopical (April 05, 2015, 04:00 PM)
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And that's the real problem.

Local standards aren't very useful for non-locals. This makes the ISO system easier to use for broad/international audiences.

Taking a page out of the cryptocurrency ecosystem, they use schemes that mirror the ISO standard (for the most part), e.g. BTC vs. DOGE, which is an exception with 4 characters.

Twinbee:
$US100
US$100
$US 100
US$ 100
US $100
USD 100
100 USD
USD $100
$100 USD

--- End quote ---

Wow talk about standardization. Just one more reason why I'd love to see a universal currency - then we could stick with '$' for everything! I think for now I might just cater for XYZ 100 (so I'd be supporting four methods of writing it in total).

It's the same with time too of course. If we all switched to UTC (or as a first step, just had 24 time zones and scrapped DST), we'd be laughing. Here's a very funny video which accurately portrays the nightmares involved when working with time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5wpm-gesOY

Renegade:
Wow talk about standardization.
-Twinbee (April 06, 2015, 07:32 AM)
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Yep. Misery.

And engineers are physically incapable of using SI metric units properly... sigh...

Just one more reason why I'd love to see a universal currency - then we could stick with '$' for everything!
-Twinbee (April 06, 2015, 07:32 AM)
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Don't you mean "฿"? :D

It's the same with time too of course. If we all switched to UTC (or as a first step, just had 24 time zones and scrapped DST), we'd be laughing. Here's a very funny video which accurately portrays the nightmares involved when working with time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5wpm-gesOY
-Twinbee (April 06, 2015, 07:32 AM)
--- End quote ---

I loathe DST... and I've done programming for time... so I understand that video far too well... But is is certainly funny! :D



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