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Author Topic: "Save the internet"  (Read 12653 times)
IainB
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« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2012, 02:41:32 AM »

Looks like the US Government has been getting very heavy-handed about this since around 2007 at least, but on foreign soil, not US - presumably all at the behest of the RIAA/MAFIAA: Not-So-Gentle Persuasion: US Bullies Spain into Proposed Website Blocking Law

Courtesy of those Wikileaks scoundrels people, apparently.
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« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2012, 04:54:47 AM »

Thanks to the internet creating an atmosphere for interaction with people from around the world, I can see why the US is so despised and am often embarrassed by our actions.

Regardless of appearances, we do not live in a free society. The concepts of the founding fathers have been usurped by our present, corrupt two-party system, and nothing is likely to change it.

We publicize the "protests" of other countries, encouraging the people to act, but if our own citizens attempt to protest (occupy wall street) we throw them in jail and/or force them to disband.

Once proud, I now feel I need to apologize for being American.
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40hz
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« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2012, 06:44:17 AM »

Once proud, I now feel I need to apologize for being American.

I don't think we need to apologize for being Americans.

What we do need to apologize for is allowing a small and very un-American cabal of religious, political, and business interests to subvert almost everything this nation stands for - and with hardly any challenge or protest on our part.

As Walt Kelly's character Pogo so aptly said:




Looks like the pushback is finally starting however. Occupy Wall Street is only the tip of the iceburg.

I wonder if that's what recently motivated 'the powers that be' to get the US military out of Afghanistan and Iraq and back home as quickly as possible. You'd almost think somebody in Washington was worried they might be needed here... Cool
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IainB
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« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2012, 07:21:49 AM »

Once proud, I now feel I need to apologize for being American.
No apology needed. Fact is, the US is still one of the greatest and most highly civilised nations in the planet's recorded history.
It was arguably the British who used to be the arch meddlers in other countries' national affairs, and now it seems to be the Americans, Russians and Arabs - but the US is the one that most others are probably most likely to envy and respect the power of. (Doesn't stop some of 'em hating the US though, I guess.)

I reckon it was put quite nicely in an earlier and separate thread in DCF:
... I equally detest smug anti-Americanism just as much as crass American self-aggrandizement.
I'm not going to apologize for living here, and believe it or not, I kinda like the place.

The people have a choice as to whether to lie down and accept anything wrong in what @40hz refers to here:
What we do need to apologize for is allowing a small and very un-American cabal of religious, political, and business interests to subvert almost everything this nation stands for - and with hardly any challenge or protest on our part.

And where he says:
I wonder if that's what recently motivated 'the powers that be' to get the US military out of Afghanistan and Iraq and back home as quickly as possible. You'd almost think somebody in Washington was worried they might be needed here... Cool
- I would suggest that one answer could be what is in unconfirmed reports, that some H-U-G-E US military materials and capability movements into Israel and its offshore are in progress.
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berry
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« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2012, 07:29:06 AM »

Once proud, I now feel I need to apologize for being American.

I don't think we need to apologize for being Americans.


Maybe not for being American, but I do feel a need to apologize for the way "America" attempts to impose it's will around the world (e.g. SOPA, etc) and explain that does not necessarily represent the thinking of the majority of americans.

See Ian's post above "Looks like the US Government has been getting very heavy-handed about this since around 2007 at least, but on foreign soil, not US - presumably all at the behest of the RIAA/MAFIAA: Not-So-Gentle Persuasion: US Bullies Spain into Proposed Website Blocking Law"

cheers
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40hz
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« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2012, 07:54:52 AM »

- I would suggest that one answer could be what is in unconfirmed reports, that some H-U-G-E US military materials and capability movements into Israel and its offshore are in progress.

Oh, I'm sure that has a lot more to do with it. Grin

My comment was more along the lines of a semi-joke. Especially since the current Mideast deployment is costing the US something like $1-billion every three days. So there's a major economic incentive to pull the military out of there as quickly as possible regardless.
 Cool
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Renegade
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« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2012, 03:03:12 PM »

... a small and very un-American cabal of religious, political, and business interests to subvert almost everything this nation stands for ...

+1

That's a key point.

While I'm not American -- I'm Canadian --- the same thing goes on in Canada in many ways.


It's embarrassing to see how Ottawa parrots the same rhetoric you get out of Washington D.C. With much of the same style of legislation. This is nothing new. It's been that way for decades.

We recently saw the same kind of totalitarian attitude by various cities with police attacking Occupy protesters in Canada as we saw in the US. WTF? Canadian police? Attacking protesters? Huh? The same people that apologize to you when YOU bump into THEM on the street?

This disease in the US is infectious... The US is just patient zero.



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IainB
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« Reply #32 on: January 07, 2012, 03:27:32 AM »

This disease in the US is infectious... The US is just patient zero.
Well, it might be Patient Zero in the Western democracies, and it might be infectious, but the non-Western non-democracies have already got a head start with their own form of totalitarian censorship - e.g., including China, Pakistan - and there have been some recent daft censorship proposals in the Indian democracy.

However, talking of "infectious", I think Iran has been able to demonstrate some innovative thought-leadership here: Iran Further Restricts Facebook and Twitter, Prepares Its Own Internet
Quote
Iran is testing a domestic Internet, a “Halal” network that will restrict citizens from penetrating foreign sites. Internet users this week reported delays in their network connections, which is believed to be connected to the new network’s trial run.

The Wall Street Journal says the domestic Internet replacement aims to restrict the influence of non-Islamic culture and western ideology. The network — technically an Intranet — should be ready to go live within a few weeks, Iranian media reported.
(There's more.)
This arguably makes a lot of sense for any Islamic theocracy in the Caliphate. Is is entirely consistent with the Koran.
Any student who has understood and learned the Koran knows that Islam draws a clear distinction between the world of Islam (Dar al-Islam) and the world of heresy (Dar al-Harb) - they are antithetical. Muslims (believers) are in the former, and all others (kafirs -  unbelievers, infidels, skeptics) are in the latter.
By plugging Iran into a national CUG (Closed User Group) Intranet, the Iranians will be simply and effectively protecting themselves from infection by Dar al-Harb via the Internet, by quarantining the Internet. That infection includes Dar al-Harb concepts - e.g., including such as "freedom", or "democracy", both of which are obscene in the Islamic context of having submitted to Islam (the word of Allah).

Iran, in common with other Muslim nation members of the global Caliphate, is a theocracy, and if this quarantining of the Internet is what they want, then why shouldn't it be done? Western Dar al-Harb concepts and ideas have the potential to corrupt, or arguably actually already have corrupted some of the basic building blocks of these Islamic societies.

At least currently, and for a while, in America there still remains the democratic freedom to protest, argue and debate proposed US proscriptive, prohibitionist, or censoring measures - e.g., such as SOPA. If you think this is a valuable thing, then be grateful for it.
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40hz
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« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2012, 08:33:30 AM »

I can't see Islamic nations retreating into their own separate virtual reality as accomplishing anything other than setting the stage for future wars. Look at what similar measures have done for North Korea. Created a paranoid and belligerent society blindly convinced of their superiority over the rest of the world. Especially now that they have nuclear weapons and feel justified in 'rattling the saber' at any who question or criticize them.

What I worry about is that their anger and fears will eventually reach the point where they become convinced (in the absence of any other viewpoint) of the necessity to do something that will prove to be extremely stupid.

Whereupon N.K. will step over the line from "potential" risk to "clear and present" threat.

At which point will only leave the question of whether North Korea's total destruction is to be carried out using a conventional or strategic class of weaponry.

I'd hope the Arab world isn't walking down that same risky path.  
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Renegade
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« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2012, 10:03:13 AM »

I can't see Islamic nations retreating into their own separate virtual reality as accomplishing anything other than setting the stage for future wars. Look at what similar measures have done for North Korea. Created a paranoid and belligerent society blindly convinced of their superiority over the rest of the world. Especially now that they have nuclear weapons and feel justified in 'rattling the saber' at any who question or criticize them.

What I worry about is that their anger and fears will eventually reach the point where they become convinced (in the absence of any other viewpoint) of the necessity to do something that will prove to be extremely stupid.

Whereupon N.K. will step over the line from "potential" risk to "clear and present" threat.

At which point will only leave the question of whether North Korea's total destruction is to be carried out using a conventional or strategic class of weaponry.

I'd hope the Arab world isn't walking down that same risky path. 




The Palatable Summary:

North Korea isn't remotely a threat. They just want free stuff.

The Arab world has been provoked for a long time. They're not going down a path -- they're being forced down it.



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40hz
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« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2012, 11:39:18 AM »

@Ren - it's not so much a problem of SK being afraid. It's more a matter of some idiots with their fingers on buttons in other places being afraid - or deciding the time has finally come to make some financially insignificant and uppity spot on the globe one of those "horrible examples of what can happen to you if..." that gets written up in history books. Brinksmanship is a very dangerous game to play. Especially when you're exclusively playing it as an unreasonable, and frankly juvenile, bully.

Check out the movie Deterrence for a plausible scenario for how something like that could work. Last I looked, you could watch the entire thing for free here.
 tellme

(The ending is a total but completely believable surprise BTW.)

The Arab world has been provoked for a long time. They're not going down a path -- they're being forced down it.

Hmm...their legitimate issues aside...I wonder. Are they really being "forced" down a path - or are they just talking themselves into taking the bait?
« Last Edit: January 07, 2012, 12:04:03 PM by 40hz » Logged

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TaoPhoenix
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« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2012, 01:26:33 PM »

Latest news is that the lawmakers want to pas it anyway, despite opposition. We're getting close to pure evil here. "We in Congress don't care that individuals are against the law. We write laws for the companies that pay us."

Edit: I just thought of something. You know who we haven't heard from? President Obama! Isn't that the *Point* of the Presidency - to sign *or* veto a bill? So far we hear the lawmakers having a grand field day - what if it runs into President Obama's Veto Hammer?
« Last Edit: January 07, 2012, 02:42:55 PM by TaoPhoenix » Logged
IainB
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« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2012, 06:55:47 PM »

I just thought of something. You know who we haven't heard from? President Obama! Isn't that the *Point* of the Presidency - to sign *or* veto a bill? So far we hear the lawmakers having a grand field day - what if it runs into President Obama's Veto Hammer?
Has Obama's performance to date indicated that he is more than likely to block anything that restricts individual freedoms/rights under the Constitution?
I would suggest that all you need to do to ensure that the proposed law change gets signed off is do nothing.
Easy.
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Renegade
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« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2012, 09:03:18 PM »

The Arab world has been provoked for a long time. They're not going down a path -- they're being forced down it.

Hmm...their legitimate issues aside...I wonder. Are they really being "forced" down a path - or are they just talking themselves into taking the bait?

Interesting point. I'm not sure there's too much of a difference though. The net effect seems to be the same. I might be missing something though. I've not really considered the different angles there much. 




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IainB
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« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2012, 11:26:38 PM »

Well, whether they were "forced down a path or chose to take it" could seem to be a subject of opinion and in any event could arguably be largely irrelevant in the context of the Iranian CUG/Intranet.

What I find interesting is that:
(a) The Iranian proposal would seem to be entirely consistent with Islamic teachings/belief (as above). (Come to think of it - though I could be wrong, of course - I don't recall ever having seen the Iranians to be inconsistent in any of their actions or proclamations/declarations.)

(b) If the infection is considered to be Western religio-political ideology in general, and if one of the main vectors for carrying that infection is the Internet, then the sensible thing could be to quarantine the vector - the Internet. That is presumably precisely what a national Iranian CUG (Closed User Group) Intranet could achieve.

Whether it is a practical approach, I wouldn't know. For example, it would presumably have been the sort of approach that the Chinese, Pakistani and Indian governments could have considered - and maybe they did and later abandoned for a variety of reasons (the biggest maybe being the risk of subjecting themselves to cultural-isolation).
But if all Islamic theocracies/nations were to do the same as the Iranian proposal, then they could form a common Islamic Caliphate CUG INTERNET, and that just might have enough mass/momentum so as to be a workable proposition. I think the concept would need to be tested out in prototype before you could be certain though. Maybe Iran's CUG proposal is a prototype for all members of the OIC/Muslim Brotherhood?

The orthodox Islamic approach is that it is forbidden - it is an offence - for kafirs (e.g., Christians - who are part of the world of heresy or "Dar al-Harb") to proselytise or seek to convert Muslims to their faith. The offence could be punishable by death. That is probably the reason behind the various reports of Christian churches being torched and Christians being killed and Christian refugees fleeing in Egypt's "Arab Spring" revolution.

Thus, by the same token, if offensive/blasphemous Western ideological paradigms/beliefs are infecting Iranian Internet users, then severing publicly-accessible connections to the WWW/Internet could be the logical thing to do. One advantage would be that nobody gets killed in that action - which is arguably a more peaceful approach than making death threats for publication of Internet media/content that is deemed to be offensive (if not blasphemous) to Muslim beliefs.

So Iran could get what they need/want. And this would not destroy the Internet - so it is still "saved" - but it would change it in a way that the original designers possibly could not have foreseen and certainly away from the early CERN-inspired concept of universal, common, "open" and "free" sharing and access of all scientific information/knowledge.

Maybe this case indicates that 2012 is going to be a very interesting year, but I suspect that, at this rate (by locking up human knowledge), it will not see us getting any closer to the mythical ideal of the three Atlantean Halls of Record that Cayce spoke of. (Sigh.)
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IainB
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« Reply #40 on: January 08, 2012, 10:03:24 PM »

Just maybe.
  • Maybe it's not only "the Internet" that needs to be in the frame for saving by our protection, but "General Computation" as well?
  • Maybe GC ("General Computation") is too dangerous to be in our hands any longer - like guns?
  • Maybe the technology of GC means that we have the potential ability to access and correlate too much information and leaked information? Thus, we could be at risk of being able to know too much and can agitate too much for the Corprate and/or State's liking - GC offers us the potential for too much freedom - e.g., including as in the exercise of our freedom of speech. (This latter point could presumably be part of what was behind the Iranian government's proposals, mentioned above.)
  • Maybe the "contagion" of the PC technology (per Nolan's Model) is perceived as a very real threat to social cohesion and control?
  • Then maybe our access to GC - like our guns (if we have them) and whatever constitutional rights we may imagine ourselves to have had - needs to be taken away?

The theory cogently put forward in a very interesting talk by Cory Doctorow is that our right to possess and freely use GC (general purpose computing) is potentially under threat of removal - The Coming War on General Computation.

I got this post from a post on TorrentFreak, copied here:

The TorentFreak post links to a Transcript of Cory Doctorow's talk, here:

This could arguably be one possible and maybe even incontrovertible explanation for the seemingly remorseless supplier-push of a plethora of devices like the X-box, iPad, Kindle, Nook and other locked-down embedded computing devices and diversions.
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40hz
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« Reply #41 on: January 09, 2012, 03:52:51 AM »

I'm glad to see none other than Cory Doctorow agrees with me that THEY are out to eliminate general purpose open computer architectures. I've been harping on that ever since Sony suddenly and arbitrarily revoked the end-user's prior option to put Linux on 'their' new Playstations - and then began enforcing it.

But there is something relatively simple and devastatingly effective that can be done if we are forced to deal with nonsense like SOPA and all the collateral hassles it brings with it.

Stop consuming!

If organizations like the RIAA and MPAA are so convinced of the astronomical value of their products that they feel justified in buying draconian and unfair legislation to prevent what are largely fictional losses, the public can respond by saying: "You're right guys! We no longer want nor can afford your product."

And now comes the important part - don't just stop buying commercial books, movies, and music - completely stop consuming it. Don't borrow it. Don't gift it. Don't bootleg or pirate it. Don't share it. Don't do anything with it.

Stop going to movies. Stop buying or downloading music and videos. Stop getting books. Just reread the books you already own or have loaded on your e-reader. Stop watching TV and listening to the radio for anything other than the news. Let your Netflix and Hulu+ accounts expire for a while. Tell your cable or satellite providers you no longer want any of their movie channels.

In short - say NO to all commercial entertainment. Just walk away with a "Thanks but no thanks!"

Send a very clear message that don't need their product. And most importantly, demonstrate you're able and willing to live without it if you don't like the terms and conditions being offered.

It will probably require about three months before the impact is felt. But when the entertainment and publishing industries suddenly see the revenue streams dwindle to a trickle (no boycott is 100% absolute) - and no increase in piracy picking up the slack - you'll soon see a change of heart. Especially once it becomes clear to them the government won't dare bail out anything as non-essential as their industry.

Not that Uncle Sam could afford to. Because by this time the government will also be feeling a some pain. No sales means no money for paying employees - or business and sales taxes. Jobs might (will) be lost. Plants might shut down. I can hear the governors of affected States screaming blue murder since their unemployment will be going up and their own tax revenues going down because of it.

Next see if Europe will join in. Encourage the general public in places like the UK, France and Spain to stop consuming any US entertainment product until the crazy US government gets its head together and stops bullying their governments into passing similarly insane laws. And then let certain US companies know they will continue to see their products sit on shelves all over Europe until such time as they successfully use their influence to get those same unfair regulations they pushed through overturned.

If it turns into a case of who blinks first, the public has time on its side. None of us will starve or become ill if we can't see a movie, read a book, or listen to a song. But the industry certainly will if you stop consuming their products.

Hopefully they won't see the light. Hopefully they'll just dig in and try to tough it out long enough to eventually go out of business. Lovely thought - no more 'old school' labels or studios - and no more of their lobbyist groups as a result.

With luck, out of the wreckage will come a new media and publishing industry in which the artists, writers, musicians, and performers - in short, the creatives - are finally control. And in which they're able to keep a greater share of the revenue their work has generated.

One of the first rules of economic efficiency is to eliminate the middlemen whenever it's practical to do so.

I think that time has arrived. It's time for the old way of thinking to go away.

And starving an obsolete industry to death is the surest way of making sure necessary changes get made.

« Last Edit: January 09, 2012, 04:03:30 AM by 40hz » Logged

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« Reply #42 on: January 09, 2012, 04:12:13 AM »

Nice idea about the worldwide boycott - but can you ever imagining it happen on anything but a token level.

What you forget is that the biggest western disease is the loss of any kind of personal interaction that isn't media based. Sad as it sounds the majority of people are either watching TV or movies or listening to music most of the time and if they aren't they are talking about it. To make this really effective you would also have to stop people going to concerts (which only really exist to increase music sales), going to clubs or any venue where copyrighted music is played in public ... hell you couldn't go to the supermarket! What about sports events - sports have just as draconian attitudes to 'rights' management.

Three days would bring on massive withdrawal symptoms for most people - three months would be like a heroin addict going cold turkey.
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« Reply #43 on: January 09, 2012, 04:33:32 AM »

I'm glad to see none other than Cory Doctorow agrees with me that THEY are out to eliminate general purpose open computer architectures. I've been harping on that ever since Sony suddenly and arbitrarily revoked the end-user's prior option to put Linux on 'their' new Playstations - and then began enforcing it.

But there is something relatively simple and devastatingly effective that can be done if we are forced to deal with nonsense like SOPA and all the collateral hassles it brings with it.

Stop consuming!

If organizations like the RIAA and MPAA are so convinced of the astronomical value of their products that they feel justified in buying draconian and unfair legislation to prevent what are largely fictional losses, the public can respond by saying: "You're right guys! We no longer want nor can afford your product."

And now comes the important part - don't just stop buying commercial books, movies, and music - completely stop consuming it. Don't borrow it. Don't gift it. Don't bootleg or pirate it. Don't share it. Don't do anything with it.

Stop going to movies. Stop buying or downloading music and videos. Stop getting books. Just reread the books you already own or have loaded on your e-reader. Stop watching TV and listening to the radio for anything other than the news. Let your Netflix and Hulu+ accounts expire for a while. Tell your cable or satellite providers you no longer want any of their movie channels.

In short - say NO to all commercial entertainment. Just walk away with a "Thanks but no thanks!"

Send a very clear message that don't need their product. And most importantly, demonstrate you're able and willing to live without it if you don't like the terms and conditions being offered.

It will probably require about three months before the impact is felt. But when the entertainment and publishing industries suddenly see the revenue streams dwindle to a trickle (no boycott is 100% absolute) - and no increase in piracy picking up the slack - you'll soon see a change of heart. Especially once it becomes clear to them the government won't dare bail out anything as non-essential as their industry.

Not that Uncle Sam could afford to. Because by this time the government will also be feeling a some pain. No sales means no money for paying employees - or business and sales taxes. Jobs might (will) be lost. Plants might shut down. I can hear the governors of affected States screaming blue murder since their unemployment will be going up and their own tax revenues going down because of it.

Next see if Europe will join in. Encourage the general public in places like the UK, France and Spain to stop consuming any US entertainment product until the crazy US government gets its head together and stops bullying their governments into passing similarly insane laws. And then let certain US companies know they will continue to see their products sit on shelves all over Europe until such time as they successfully use their influence to get those same unfair regulations they pushed through overturned.

If it turns into a case of who blinks first, the public has time on its side. None of us will starve or become ill if we can't see a movie, read a book, or listen to a song. But the industry certainly will if you stop consuming their products.

Hopefully they won't see the light. Hopefully they'll just dig in and try to tough it out long enough to eventually go out of business. Lovely thought - no more 'old school' labels or studios - and no more of their lobbyist groups as a result.

With luck, out of the wreckage will come a new media and publishing industry in which the artists, writers, musicians, and performers - in short, the creatives - are finally control. And in which they're able to keep a greater share of the revenue their work has generated.

One of the first rules of economic efficiency is to eliminate the middlemen whenever it's practical to do so.

I think that time has arrived. It's time for the old way of thinking to go away.

And starving an obsolete industry to death is the surest way of making sure necessary changes get made.
 (see attachment in previous post)



Nice call to action~! smiley


Here are a few things to help wean any interested people off of mainstream media productions (in no particular order):


Truth Theory:
A fantastic site that links to all sorts of documentaries that you can watch for free. New videos come out daily. Most videos are on Youtube.

Currently "Ungrip" is on the front page. Great stuff. Highly recommended.


Documentaries Lectures:
Another great site full of all sorts of documentaries and lectures. smiley It's very similar to Truth Theory, but simply has different videos. I'd recommend both of these sites. Again, you can watch everything for free. This site kicks! New videos come out daily. Most videos are on Youtube.


Vodo:
Free films from independent film makers. Great stuff there. I've recommended a few from there in various threads here. (Look for "The Third Letter" for a techno-horror future that reinforces why we should have GPL'd software in medicine. Check "Watch Alice Bleed" for a disturbing bit of entertainment -- warning -- it is very disturbing and not for those of a sensitive nature.) Here, everything is on torrent.


RT.com - Russia Today
A fresh approach to news. Not the typical propaganda that you've been used to. If anything, it exposes propaganda in mainstream media. God... I was so happy when I discovered RT...


Alex Jones' sites:
Infowars < Alternative news
Prison Planet < Alternative news
Prison Planet TV < Lots of videos here

Alex has a TONNE (that's metric) of amazing stuff.

Now, here's the kicker... Prison Planet TV requires a subscription... which isn't free... BUT... You can watch pretty much all of it online on Youtube for free. There's more... HE ENCOURAGES PEOPLE TO SHARE HIS VIDEOS. HE WANTS YOU TO "PIRATE" HIS VIDEOS! Well, not pirate... share as it were.

With a subscription, you can share that login/subscription with 5 more people! So, 6 people get to use 1 subscription! And, you can all download everything, upload it to Youtube or burn it to CD/DVD, and share it with as many people as you want!

I *just* bought a subscription, and have given out my login to 3 other people. So, if anyone wants to use it, let me know as I can share with 2 more people. Just PM me or email me. I'll give out the login to the first 2 people I hear from. (I'd only ask that if you decide not to use it, you tell me so that I can give it to someone else.)


Anyways, there are a few non-mainstream media sources for anyone who is interested. I can give out a few more, but those are pretty much the top of my list at the moment.




(Side note: I saw the new "Mission Impossible" the other night. DO NOT bother going to see it. Waste of money. It should have been a made for TV movie. Hollywood is really grasping with this one...)




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Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker
IainB
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« Reply #44 on: January 09, 2012, 05:44:33 AM »

Well, there are precedents for consumer boycotts - similar to what 40hz suggests - that have been tremendously effective. For example, it worked a treat for CAMRA (CAMpaign for Real Ale) in the UK. The big beer combines turned their marketing plans around 180° when they saw how the boycott was causing a slump in UK beer sales and a fall in their share (stock) prices.
I was an early member of CAMRA and recall doing my bit to preserve the beautiful real ales that were going to be expunged.

And when Cadbury-Schweppes started to put Palm Oil into their Cadbury chocolate (which then tasted horrible) as a substitute for the more expensive dairy/cocoa fats, the subsequent outrage and boycott by Cadbury fans made them change their minds PDQ.
(Which reminds me, I bought some Nestle Caramac today, telling my daughter how yummy it used to be. Yech! Yes, it contained "Vegetable Fat" - aka Palm Oil.)

Internet users are a huge, relatively well-informed and interconnected population.
We've already seen how Internet users can rise to the occasion over the Paul Christoforo Ocean Marketing emails and GoDaddy's support of SOPA. If there was an even bigger and worthy cause at stake (e.g., the preservation of the integrity of the Internet), then you could expect an equally massive swing of clever collaboration and protest about DRM being used to kill the 'net.

Maybe we need a "Boycott DRM Media proponents" Facebook page?
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IainB
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« Reply #45 on: January 10, 2012, 04:44:44 AM »

Interesting post at Slashdot: Inside the Great Firewall of China's Tor Blocking
Quote
Inside the Great Firewall of China's Tor Blocking
by Unknown Lamer

Trailrunner7 writes with an article at Threat Post about China's ability to block Tor. From the article: "The much-discussed Great Firewall of China is meant to prevent Chinese citizens from getting to Web sites and content that the country's government doesn't approve of, and it's been endowed with some near-mythical powers by observers over the years. But it's somewhat rare to get a look at the way that the system actually works in practice. Researchers at Team Cymru got just that recently when they were asked by the folks at the Tor Project to help investigate why a user in China was having his connections to a bridge relay outside of China terminated so quickly. Not only is China able to identify Tor sessions, it can do so in near real-time and then probe the Tor bridge relay and terminate the session within a couple of minutes."

And this could be useful: "Save the Internet.com"
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JavaJones
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« Reply #46 on: January 12, 2012, 11:09:26 PM »

I reckon perhaps more effective than an outright boycott would be a massive move over to independent media. After all, with a sudden drop-off of sales and no corresponding rise in other legitimate media business, they can just claim piracy has had a huge jump and they need even more draconian laws to handle it.

- Oshyan
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40hz
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« Reply #47 on: January 13, 2012, 03:37:54 PM »




So much for bullying other countries into passing laws. Now it seem the US has sold the UK on enforcing US laws as well.

This news just in time for Friday the 13th:

Quote
‘Guinea pig’ extradition case sets dangerous precedent for pirating Britons

By Zack Whittaker | January 13, 2012, 7:41am PST

Summary: British citizens can now be extradited to the United States based on a ‘guinea pig’ case regarding the alleged infringement of copyrighted works.

Link to full article here.

 undecided
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40hz
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« Reply #48 on: January 13, 2012, 03:42:27 PM »

I reckon perhaps more effective than an outright boycott would be a massive move over to independent media. After all, with a sudden drop-off of sales and no corresponding rise in other legitimate media business, they can just claim piracy has had a huge jump and they need even more draconian laws to handle it.

- Oshyan

All the more reason why you need to stop consuming. Pirating just plays into their hands.

And alternate indy isn't really viable as a method for sending a message. They'll just keep harassing indies and passing laws until they eliminate them. That's how they got a fee put on audio cassettes. All blanks in the US had a tariff (something like 50¢ each) that got paid back to the recording industry to compensate the for the losses to piracy the music industry 'just knew' were taking place.

You need to kill these people before they get laws passed that makes DRM mandatory for all media. BEcause once that happens they'll be able to survive indefinitely just by licensing that technology.

To defeat big media, you need to put them out of business in a clear and true capitalist fashion such that it gives them no grounds to go running to the government begging for intervention.

Starve them to death. It's the only way. Cool
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superboyac
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« Reply #49 on: January 13, 2012, 04:05:51 PM »

Wow!  That Cory Doctorow stuff is excellent!  So juicy.  I loved reading that.  I love hearing from people explain things with such clarity.
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