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Last post Author Topic: "Save the internet"  (Read 14609 times)

IainB

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2012, 02:41:32 AM »
Looks like the US Government has been getting very heavy-handed about this since around 2007 at least, but on foreign soil, not US - presumably all at the behest of the RIAA/MAFIAA: Not-So-Gentle Persuasion: US Bullies Spain into Proposed Website Blocking Law

Courtesy of those Wikileaks scoundrels people, apparently.

berry

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2012, 04:54:47 AM »
Thanks to the internet creating an atmosphere for interaction with people from around the world, I can see why the US is so despised and am often embarrassed by our actions.

Regardless of appearances, we do not live in a free society. The concepts of the founding fathers have been usurped by our present, corrupt two-party system, and nothing is likely to change it.

We publicize the "protests" of other countries, encouraging the people to act, but if our own citizens attempt to protest (occupy wall street) we throw them in jail and/or force them to disband.

Once proud, I now feel I need to apologize for being American.

40hz

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2012, 06:44:17 AM »
Once proud, I now feel I need to apologize for being American.

I don't think we need to apologize for being Americans.

What we do need to apologize for is allowing a small and very un-American cabal of religious, political, and business interests to subvert almost everything this nation stands for - and with hardly any challenge or protest on our part.

As Walt Kelly's character Pogo so aptly said:

pogo.jpg


Looks like the pushback is finally starting however. Occupy Wall Street is only the tip of the iceburg.

I wonder if that's what recently motivated 'the powers that be' to get the US military out of Afghanistan and Iraq and back home as quickly as possible. You'd almost think somebody in Washington was worried they might be needed here... 8)

IainB

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2012, 07:21:49 AM »
Once proud, I now feel I need to apologize for being American.
No apology needed. Fact is, the US is still one of the greatest and most highly civilised nations in the planet's recorded history.
It was arguably the British who used to be the arch meddlers in other countries' national affairs, and now it seems to be the Americans, Russians and Arabs - but the US is the one that most others are probably most likely to envy and respect the power of. (Doesn't stop some of 'em hating the US though, I guess.)

I reckon it was put quite nicely in an earlier and separate thread in DCF:
... I equally detest smug anti-Americanism just as much as crass American self-aggrandizement.
I'm not going to apologize for living here, and believe it or not, I kinda like the place.

The people have a choice as to whether to lie down and accept anything wrong in what @40hz refers to here:
What we do need to apologize for is allowing a small and very un-American cabal of religious, political, and business interests to subvert almost everything this nation stands for - and with hardly any challenge or protest on our part.

And where he says:
I wonder if that's what recently motivated 'the powers that be' to get the US military out of Afghanistan and Iraq and back home as quickly as possible. You'd almost think somebody in Washington was worried they might be needed here... 8)
- I would suggest that one answer could be what is in unconfirmed reports, that some H-U-G-E US military materials and capability movements into Israel and its offshore are in progress.

berry

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2012, 07:29:06 AM »
Once proud, I now feel I need to apologize for being American.

I don't think we need to apologize for being Americans.


Maybe not for being American, but I do feel a need to apologize for the way "America" attempts to impose it's will around the world (e.g. SOPA, etc) and explain that does not necessarily represent the thinking of the majority of americans.

See Ian's post above "Looks like the US Government has been getting very heavy-handed about this since around 2007 at least, but on foreign soil, not US - presumably all at the behest of the RIAA/MAFIAA: Not-So-Gentle Persuasion: US Bullies Spain into Proposed Website Blocking Law"

cheers

40hz

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2012, 07:54:52 AM »
- I would suggest that one answer could be what is in unconfirmed reports, that some H-U-G-E US military materials and capability movements into Israel and its offshore are in progress.

Oh, I'm sure that has a lot more to do with it. ;D

My comment was more along the lines of a semi-joke. Especially since the current Mideast deployment is costing the US something like $1-billion every three days. So there's a major economic incentive to pull the military out of there as quickly as possible regardless.
 8)

Renegade

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2012, 03:03:12 PM »
... a small and very un-American cabal of religious, political, and business interests to subvert almost everything this nation stands for ...

+1

That's a key point.

While I'm not American -- I'm Canadian --- the same thing goes on in Canada in many ways.

NSFW analogy
If Ottawa can't taste Washington D.C.'s cock, it's because it's in Ottawa's ever-so-willing ass.


It's embarrassing to see how Ottawa parrots the same rhetoric you get out of Washington D.C. With much of the same style of legislation. This is nothing new. It's been that way for decades.

We recently saw the same kind of totalitarian attitude by various cities with police attacking Occupy protesters in Canada as we saw in the US. WTF? Canadian police? Attacking protesters? Huh? The same people that apologize to you when YOU bump into THEM on the street?

This disease in the US is infectious... The US is just patient zero.



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Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

IainB

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #32 on: January 07, 2012, 03:27:32 AM »
This disease in the US is infectious... The US is just patient zero.
Well, it might be Patient Zero in the Western democracies, and it might be infectious, but the non-Western non-democracies have already got a head start with their own form of totalitarian censorship - e.g., including China, Pakistan - and there have been some recent daft censorship proposals in the Indian democracy.

However, talking of "infectious", I think Iran has been able to demonstrate some innovative thought-leadership here: Iran Further Restricts Facebook and Twitter, Prepares Its Own Internet
Quote
Iran is testing a domestic Internet, a “Halal” network that will restrict citizens from penetrating foreign sites. Internet users this week reported delays in their network connections, which is believed to be connected to the new network’s trial run.

The Wall Street Journal says the domestic Internet replacement aims to restrict the influence of non-Islamic culture and western ideology. The network — technically an Intranet — should be ready to go live within a few weeks, Iranian media reported.
(There's more.)
This arguably makes a lot of sense for any Islamic theocracy in the Caliphate. Is is entirely consistent with the Koran.
Any student who has understood and learned the Koran knows that Islam draws a clear distinction between the world of Islam (Dar al-Islam) and the world of heresy (Dar al-Harb) - they are antithetical. Muslims (believers) are in the former, and all others (kafirs -  unbelievers, infidels, skeptics) are in the latter.
By plugging Iran into a national CUG (Closed User Group) Intranet, the Iranians will be simply and effectively protecting themselves from infection by Dar al-Harb via the Internet, by quarantining the Internet. That infection includes Dar al-Harb concepts - e.g., including such as "freedom", or "democracy", both of which are obscene in the Islamic context of having submitted to Islam (the word of Allah).

Iran, in common with other Muslim nation members of the global Caliphate, is a theocracy, and if this quarantining of the Internet is what they want, then why shouldn't it be done? Western Dar al-Harb concepts and ideas have the potential to corrupt, or arguably actually already have corrupted some of the basic building blocks of these Islamic societies.

At least currently, and for a while, in America there still remains the democratic freedom to protest, argue and debate proposed US proscriptive, prohibitionist, or censoring measures - e.g., such as SOPA. If you think this is a valuable thing, then be grateful for it.

40hz

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2012, 08:33:30 AM »
I can't see Islamic nations retreating into their own separate virtual reality as accomplishing anything other than setting the stage for future wars. Look at what similar measures have done for North Korea. Created a paranoid and belligerent society blindly convinced of their superiority over the rest of the world. Especially now that they have nuclear weapons and feel justified in 'rattling the saber' at any who question or criticize them.

What I worry about is that their anger and fears will eventually reach the point where they become convinced (in the absence of any other viewpoint) of the necessity to do something that will prove to be extremely stupid.

Whereupon N.K. will step over the line from "potential" risk to "clear and present" threat.

At which point will only leave the question of whether North Korea's total destruction is to be carried out using a conventional or strategic class of weaponry.

I'd hope the Arab world isn't walking down that same risky path.  

Renegade

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2012, 10:03:13 AM »
I can't see Islamic nations retreating into their own separate virtual reality as accomplishing anything other than setting the stage for future wars. Look at what similar measures have done for North Korea. Created a paranoid and belligerent society blindly convinced of their superiority over the rest of the world. Especially now that they have nuclear weapons and feel justified in 'rattling the saber' at any who question or criticize them.

What I worry about is that their anger and fears will eventually reach the point where they become convinced (in the absence of any other viewpoint) of the necessity to do something that will prove to be extremely stupid.

Whereupon N.K. will step over the line from "potential" risk to "clear and present" threat.

At which point will only leave the question of whether North Korea's total destruction is to be carried out using a conventional or strategic class of weaponry.

I'd hope the Arab world isn't walking down that same risky path. 



My belligerent peace-mongering -- likely to be offensive to some

The media paints a very scary picture, but I don't believe it's very accurate. It's just typical fear-mongering media hysteria.

NOBODY in South Korea is scared of the North. Nobody. I've never talked to anyone remotely worried about it. And yes, I've talked to several spooks about it too.

It's all a game to "get stuff".

North Korea will continue to play that game for as long as they can. They get what they want most of the time, and they get to keep power. The will not step over into "clear and present" threat. That's counter productive.

Pyong-yang is a controlled city. Entrance is restricted. Nothing you see in PY is remotely representative of the rest of the country.

Elsewhere, people live in abject poverty. Starvation is common. They're not concerned about much other than figuring out where their next meal comes from (and avoiding any potential party wrath).

North Korea has more than enough troops to completely destroy the US 8th army. I've had officers in the 8th army tell me, "We're just a speed bump for them." They would roll over Seoul before anyone could do anything. However, they can't keep it. And everyone knows it. So... they all dance along as NK leads.



Iran is only a threat in the same way that if you beat, torture, mistreat, and corner a dog, that dog will be dangerous as well. Whose fault is it? The dog's fault? Hardly. The US has committed the most vile sins imaginable in the Middle East, and still, somehow, it's all THEIR fault.

For the Arab world going down a risky path? It's more like a pack of cruel boys with a dog on a leash, yanking it, beating it, torturing it, and dragging it down a "risky path" because they did the same thing to it yesterday, and this morning when they went to beat it, it bit one of them. Now they'll "teach it a real lesson"...  :-\



The Palatable Summary:

North Korea isn't remotely a threat. They just want free stuff.

The Arab world has been provoked for a long time. They're not going down a path -- they're being forced down it.



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Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

40hz

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2012, 11:39:18 AM »
@Ren - it's not so much a problem of SK being afraid. It's more a matter of some idiots with their fingers on buttons in other places being afraid - or deciding the time has finally come to make some financially insignificant and uppity spot on the globe one of those "horrible examples of what can happen to you if..." that gets written up in history books. Brinksmanship is a very dangerous game to play. Especially when you're exclusively playing it as an unreasonable, and frankly juvenile, bully.

Check out the movie Deterrence for a plausible scenario for how something like that could work. Last I looked, you could watch the entire thing for free here.
 :tellme:

(The ending is a total but completely believable surprise BTW.)

The Arab world has been provoked for a long time. They're not going down a path -- they're being forced down it.

Hmm...their legitimate issues aside...I wonder. Are they really being "forced" down a path - or are they just talking themselves into taking the bait?
« Last Edit: January 07, 2012, 12:04:03 PM by 40hz »

TaoPhoenix

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2012, 01:26:33 PM »
Latest news is that the lawmakers want to pas it anyway, despite opposition. We're getting close to pure evil here. "We in Congress don't care that individuals are against the law. We write laws for the companies that pay us."

Edit: I just thought of something. You know who we haven't heard from? President Obama! Isn't that the *Point* of the Presidency - to sign *or* veto a bill? So far we hear the lawmakers having a grand field day - what if it runs into President Obama's Veto Hammer?
« Last Edit: January 07, 2012, 02:42:55 PM by TaoPhoenix »

IainB

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2012, 06:55:47 PM »
I just thought of something. You know who we haven't heard from? President Obama! Isn't that the *Point* of the Presidency - to sign *or* veto a bill? So far we hear the lawmakers having a grand field day - what if it runs into President Obama's Veto Hammer?
Has Obama's performance to date indicated that he is more than likely to block anything that restricts individual freedoms/rights under the Constitution?
I would suggest that all you need to do to ensure that the proposed law change gets signed off is do nothing.
Easy.

Renegade

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2012, 09:03:18 PM »
The Arab world has been provoked for a long time. They're not going down a path -- they're being forced down it.

Hmm...their legitimate issues aside...I wonder. Are they really being "forced" down a path - or are they just talking themselves into taking the bait?

Interesting point. I'm not sure there's too much of a difference though. The net effect seems to be the same. I might be missing something though. I've not really considered the different angles there much. 




Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

IainB

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2012, 11:26:38 PM »
Well, whether they were "forced down a path or chose to take it" could seem to be a subject of opinion and in any event could arguably be largely irrelevant in the context of the Iranian CUG/Intranet.

What I find interesting is that:
(a) The Iranian proposal would seem to be entirely consistent with Islamic teachings/belief (as above). (Come to think of it - though I could be wrong, of course - I don't recall ever having seen the Iranians to be inconsistent in any of their actions or proclamations/declarations.)

(b) If the infection is considered to be Western religio-political ideology in general, and if one of the main vectors for carrying that infection is the Internet, then the sensible thing could be to quarantine the vector - the Internet. That is presumably precisely what a national Iranian CUG (Closed User Group) Intranet could achieve.

Whether it is a practical approach, I wouldn't know. For example, it would presumably have been the sort of approach that the Chinese, Pakistani and Indian governments could have considered - and maybe they did and later abandoned for a variety of reasons (the biggest maybe being the risk of subjecting themselves to cultural-isolation).
But if all Islamic theocracies/nations were to do the same as the Iranian proposal, then they could form a common Islamic Caliphate CUG INTERNET, and that just might have enough mass/momentum so as to be a workable proposition. I think the concept would need to be tested out in prototype before you could be certain though. Maybe Iran's CUG proposal is a prototype for all members of the OIC/Muslim Brotherhood?

The orthodox Islamic approach is that it is forbidden - it is an offence - for kafirs (e.g., Christians - who are part of the world of heresy or "Dar al-Harb") to proselytise or seek to convert Muslims to their faith. The offence could be punishable by death. That is probably the reason behind the various reports of Christian churches being torched and Christians being killed and Christian refugees fleeing in Egypt's "Arab Spring" revolution.

Thus, by the same token, if offensive/blasphemous Western ideological paradigms/beliefs are infecting Iranian Internet users, then severing publicly-accessible connections to the WWW/Internet could be the logical thing to do. One advantage would be that nobody gets killed in that action - which is arguably a more peaceful approach than making death threats for publication of Internet media/content that is deemed to be offensive (if not blasphemous) to Muslim beliefs.

So Iran could get what they need/want. And this would not destroy the Internet - so it is still "saved" - but it would change it in a way that the original designers possibly could not have foreseen and certainly away from the early CERN-inspired concept of universal, common, "open" and "free" sharing and access of all scientific information/knowledge.

Maybe this case indicates that 2012 is going to be a very interesting year, but I suspect that, at this rate (by locking up human knowledge), it will not see us getting any closer to the mythical ideal of the three Atlantean Halls of Record that Cayce spoke of. (Sigh.)

IainB

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #40 on: January 08, 2012, 10:03:24 PM »
Just maybe.
  • Maybe it's not only "the Internet" that needs to be in the frame for saving by our protection, but "General Computation" as well?
  • Maybe GC ("General Computation") is too dangerous to be in our hands any longer - like guns?
  • Maybe the technology of GC means that we have the potential ability to access and correlate too much information and leaked information? Thus, we could be at risk of being able to know too much and can agitate too much for the Corprate and/or State's liking - GC offers us the potential for too much freedom - e.g., including as in the exercise of our freedom of speech. (This latter point could presumably be part of what was behind the Iranian government's proposals, mentioned above.)
  • Maybe the "contagion" of the PC technology (per Nolan's Model) is perceived as a very real threat to social cohesion and control?
  • Then maybe our access to GC - like our guns (if we have them) and whatever constitutional rights we may imagine ourselves to have had - needs to be taken away?

The theory cogently put forward in a very interesting talk by Cory Doctorow is that our right to possess and freely use GC (general purpose computing) is potentially under threat of removal - The Coming War on General Computation.

I got this post from a post on TorrentFreak, copied here:
Spoiler
Quote
From: Doctorow’s Omen Shows Why We Need To Ban DRM

Cory Doctorow held a presentation just before the turn of the year, showing how the current copyright wars are just a skirmish in the battles yet to come. It is a very strong omen that gives you an idea just how much is at stake in the coming two decades.

Doctorow’s presentation is here. It is time well spent — Cory Doctorow is also quite the entertainer, even with a very serious message. If you want to speedread a transcript instead, you can do so here.

In short, Doctorow argues that the copyright industry’s fight isn’t against copying, but against general-purpose computers. As more and more devices we buy are general-purpose hardware devices with custom software designed to make that hardware do certain things out of the box, that custom software that drives the device is also custom-izable software that lets the hardware be recoded and repurposed to do completely different things.

Shortly, we’ll see basically every industry trying to crack down on the freedom to tinker, to keep the products they sold us in the same state as they were before we owned them. This is exactly where we’re headed if the current trends continue.

The problem is that many people don’t understand what a general-purpose computer is. Legislators still think in terms of hardware: A cassette player can only play a cassette. Therefore, a music player today must only play music.

That’s wrong of course. A music player today can be recoded to play, stream, receive, remix, or do other things with music. Or, for that matter, it could probably be recoded to become a networked earthquake early-warning sensor instead, if its microphone was sensitive enough to sense the low-frequency sounds that forebode earthquakes.

This idea — that an off-the-shelf entertainment device can be repurposed to become an earthquake early-warning sensor with just the copying of a file — is mind-boggling to today’s legislators. It is just so far out it doesn’t reflect sunlight any more. And it is with this mindset that they legislate that breaking any DRM — repurposing devices that you own — should be punishable with jail time.

This is the reason that I keep reminding the world why we need to ban DRM altogether. It is corporations writing their own laws restricting your property.

But it goes beyond that. Let’s return to the concept of the general-purpose computer. In the mindset of today’s oldish legislators, if you want to kill the possibility of broadcasting music from a music player, you remove some piece from that device. Just like you would remove a “stream” button from a keyboard.

But as we know, it doesn’t work like that. If you want to prevent a general-purpose computer from running a certain type of code, you have to add something to it. You have to add code that prevents it from running this type of code, which it has been designed to do, after all.

And this is where it gets interesting. Since you own the general-purpose computer, you can run any code on it — including code that removes the code preventing you from running some types of code. These instructions that kill the DRM restrictions, seen from the device’s point of view, is just any kind of code that the device will execute happily.

And so protection for the removal of the DRM code is built in next, like Sony did with its criminal rootkit in 2005 (which is why Sony is on my permanent blacklist). So then that code is removed first by the person owning the device, followed by the DRM code.

The general-purpose computer is, by its very definition, a device where DRM will never work.

The major problem is that legislators don’t understand this. They don’t understand that you need to add something to the device to make it less functional, and that this something can easily be removed by an end-user to restore full functionality again. So we get an endless nightmare where legislators mandate more code, more laws, more code, and yet more laws to try to add restricting code to our general-purpose devices, code that we can easily remove.

We need to shift the viewpoint and narrative on this story — we need to make legislators understand the concept of a general-purpose computer, and that by definition, you can’t restrict it from running code. We need a Freedom to Code at the citizen level, at the same constitutional level as Freedom of Speech, even if it goes against corporate interests. No, scratch that: especially when it goes against corporate interests.

Of course, one might argue that a general freedom to code would also be a freedom to code those pesky DRM restrictions. That is true on a philosophical level. The fight here, however, is to get an understanding of the general-purpose computer on a conceptual level into legislatures.


The TorentFreak post links to a Transcript of Cory Doctorow's talk, here:
Spoiler
Quote
Transcript copied from: github.com

The Coming War on General Computation
Cory Doctorow doctorow@craphound.com
Presented at 28C3

Transcribed by Joshua Wise joshua@joshuawise.com.

This transcription attempts to be faithful to the original, but disfluencies have generally been removed (except where they appear to contribute to the text). Some words may have been mangled by the transcription; feel free to submit pull requests to correct them!

Times are always marked in [[double square brackets]].

The original content was licensed under Creative Commons CC-BY (http://boingboing.ne...-28c3-keynote.html); this transcript is more free, as permitted. You may provide me transcript attribution if you like, or if it does not make sense given the context, you can simply give Cory Doctorow original author attribution.

If you simply wish to read the transcript, you may wish to read a version that has been formatted for screen viewing, on my web site.

Christian W\"ohrl has also submitted a translation of this text into German.

Introducer:

Anyway, I believe I've killed enough time ... so, ladies and gentlemen, a person who in this crowd needs absolutely no introduction, Cory Doctorow!

[Audience applauds.]

Doctorow:

[[27.0]] Thank you.

[[32.0]] So, when I speak in places where the first language of the nation is not English, there is a disclaimer and an apology, because I'm one of nature's fast talkers. When I was at the United Nations at the World Intellectual Property Organization, I was known as the "scourge" of the simultaneous translation corps; I would stand up and speak, and turn around, and there would be window after window of translator, and every one of them would be doing this [Doctorow facepalms]. [Audience laughs] So in advance, I give you permission when I start talking quickly to do this [Doctorow makes SOS motion] and I will slow down.

[[74.1]] So, tonight's talk -- wah, wah, waaah [Doctorow makes 'fail horn' sound, apparently in response to audience making SOS motion; audience laughs]] -- tonight's talk is not a copyright talk. I do copyright talks all the time; questions about culture and creativity are interesting enough, but to be honest, I'm quite sick of them. If you want to hear freelancer writers like me bang on about what's happening to the way we earn our living, by all means, go and find one of the many talks I've done on this subject on YouTube. But, tonight, I want to talk about something more important -- I want to talk about general purpose computers.

Because general purpose computers are, in fact, astounding -- so astounding that our society is still struggling to come to grips with them: to figure out what they're for, to figure out how to accommodate them, and how to cope with them. Which, unfortunately, brings me back to copyright.

[[133.8]] Because the general shape of the copyright wars and the lessons they can teach us about the upcoming fights over the destiny of the general purpose computer are important. In the beginning, we had packaged software, and the attendant industry, and we had sneakernet. So, we had floppy disks in ziplock bags, or in cardboard boxes, hung on pegs in shops, and sold like candy bars and magazines. And they were eminently susceptible to duplication, and so they were duplicated quickly, and widely, and this was to the great chagrin of people who made and sold software.

[[172.6]] Enter DRM 0.96. They started to introduce physical defects to the disks or started to insist on other physical indicia which the software could check for -- dongles, hidden sectors, challenge/response protocols that required that you had physical possession of large, unwieldy manuals that were difficult to copy, and of course these failed, for two reasons. First, they were commercially unpopular, of course, because they reduced the usefulness of the software to the legitimate purchasers, while leaving the people who took the software without paying for it untouched. The legitimate purchasers resented the non-functionality of their backups, they hated the loss of scarce ports to the authentication dongles, and they resented the inconvenience of having to transport large manuals when they wanted to run their software. And second, these didn't stop pirates, who found it trivial to patch the software and bypass authentication. Typically, the way that happened is some expert who had possession of technology and expertise of equivalent sophistication to the software vendor itself, would reverse engineer the software and release cracked versions that quickly became widely circulated. While this kind of expertise and technology sounded highly specialized, it really wasn't; figuring out what recalcitrant programs were doing, and routing around the defects in shitty floppy disk media were both core skills for computer programmers, and were even more so in the era of fragile floppy disks and the rough-and-ready early days of software development. Anti-copying strategies only became more fraught as networks spread; once we had BBSes, online services, USENET newsgroups, and mailing lists, the expertise of people who figured out how to defeat these authentication systems could be packaged up in software as little crack files, or, as the network capacity increased, the cracked disk images or executables themselves could be spread on their own.

[[296.4]] Which gave us DRM 1.0. By 1996, it became clear to everyone in the halls of power that there was something important about to happen. We were about to have an information economy, whatever the hell that was. They assumed it meant an economy where we bought and sold information. Now, information technology makes things efficient, so imagine the markets that an information economy would have. You could buy a book for a day, you could sell the right to watch the movie for one Euro, and then you could rent out the pause button at one penny per second. You could sell movies for one price in one country, and another price in another, and so on, and so on; the fantasies of those days were a little like a boring science fiction adaptation of the Old Testament book of Numbers, a kind of tedious enumeration of every permutation of things people do with information and the ways we could charge them for it.

[[355.5]] But none of this would be possible unless we could control how people use their computers and the files we transfer to them. After all, it was well and good to talk about selling someone the 24 hour right to a video, or the right to move music onto an iPod, but not the right to move music from the iPod onto another device, but how the Hell could you do that once you'd given them the file? In order to do that, to make this work, you needed to figure out how to stop computers from running certain programs and inspecting certain files and processes. For example, you could encrypt the file, and then require the user to run a program that only unlocked the file under certain circumstances.

[[395.8]] But as they say on the Internet, "now you have two problems". You also, now, have to stop the user from saving the file while it's in the clear, and you have to stop the user from figuring out where the unlocking program stores its keys, because if the user finds the keys, she'll just decrypt the file and throw away that stupid player app.

[[416.6]] And now you have three problems [audience laughs], because now you have to stop the users who figure out how to render the file in the clear from sharing it with other users, and now you've got four! problems, because now you have to stop the users who figure out how to extract secrets from unlocking programs from telling other users how to do it too, and now you've got five! problems, because now you have to stop users who figure out how to extract secrets from unlocking programs from telling other users what the secrets were!

[[442.0]] That's a lot of problems. But by 1996, we had a solution. We had the WIPO Copyright Treaty, passed by the United Nations World Intellectual Property Organization, which created laws that made it illegal to extract secrets from unlocking programs, and it created laws that made it illegal to extract media cleartexts from the unlocking programs while they were running, and it created laws that made it illegal to tell people how to extract secrets from unlocking programs, and created laws that made it illegal to host copyrighted works and secrets and all with a handy streamlined process that let you remove stuff from the Internet without having to screw around with lawyers, and judges, and all that crap. And with that, illegal copying ended forever [audience laughs very hard, applauds], the information economy blossomed into a beautiful flower that brought prosperity to the whole wide world; as they say on the aircraft carriers, "Mission Accomplished". [audience laughs]

[[511.0]] Well, of course that's not how the story ends because pretty much anyone who understood computers and networks understood that while these laws would create more problems than they could possibly solve; after all, these were laws that made it illegal to look inside your computer when it was running certain programs, they made it illegal to tell people what you found when you looked inside your computer, they made it easy to censor material on the internet without having to prove that anything wrong had happened; in short, they made unrealistic demands on reality and reality did not oblige them. After all, copying only got easier following the passage of these laws -- copying will only ever get easier! Here, 2011, this is as hard as copying will get! Your grandchildren will turn to you around the Christmas table and say "Tell me again, Grandpa, tell me again, Grandma, about when it was hard to copy things in 2011, when you couldn't get a drive the size of your fingernail that could hold every song ever recorded, every movie ever made, every word ever spoken, every picture ever taken, everything, and transfer it in such a short period of time you didn't even notice it was doing it, tell us again when it was so stupidly hard to copy things back in 2011". And so, reality asserted itself, and everyone had a good laugh over how funny our misconceptions were when we entered the 21st century, and then a lasting peace was reached with freedom and prosperity for all. [audience chuckles]

[[593.5]] Well, not really. Because, like the nursery rhyme lady who swallows a spider to catch a fly, and has to swallow a bird to catch the spider, and a cat to catch the bird, and so on, so must a regulation that has broad general appeal but is disastrous in its implementation beget a new regulation aimed at shoring up the failure of the old one. Now, it's tempting to stop the story here and conclude that the problem is that lawmakers are either clueless or evil, or possibly evilly clueless, and just leave it there, which is not a very satisfying place to go, because it's fundamentally a counsel of despair; it suggests that our problems cannot be solved for so long as stupidity and evilness are present in the halls of power, which is to say they will never be solved. But I have another theory about what's happened.

[[644.4]] It's not that regulators don't understand information technology, because it should be possible to be a non-expert and still make a good law! M.P.s and Congressmen and so on are elected to represent districts and people, not disciplines and issues. We don't have a Member of Parliament for biochemistry, and we don't have a Senator from the great state of urban planning, and we don't have an M.E.P. from child welfare. (But perhaps we should.) And yet those people who are experts in policy and politics, not technical disciplines, nevertheless, often do manage to pass good rules that make sense, and that's because government relies on heuristics -- rules of thumbs about how to balance expert input from different sides of an issue.

[[686.3]] But information technology confounds these heuristics -- it kicks the crap out of them -- in one important way, and this is it. One important test of whether or not a regulation is fit for a purpose is first, of course, whether it will work, but second of all, whether or not in the course of doing its work, it will have lots of effects on everything else. If I wanted Congress to write, or Parliament to write, or the E.U. to regulate a wheel, it's unlikely I'd succeed. If I turned up and said "well, everyone knows that wheels are good and right, but have you noticed that every single bank robber has four wheels on his car when he drives away from the bank robbery? Can't we do something about this?", the answer would of course be "no". Because we don't know how to make a wheel that is still generally useful for legitimate wheel applications but useless to bad guys. And we can all see that the general benefits of wheels are so profound that we'd be foolish to risk them in a foolish errand to stop bank robberies by changing wheels. Even if there were an /epidemic/ of bank robberies, even if society were on the verge of collapse thanks to bank robberies, no-one would think that wheels were the right place to start solving our problems.

[[762.0]] But. If I were to show up in that same body to say that I had absolute proof that hands-free phones were making cars dangerous, and I said, "I would like you to pass a law that says it's illegal to put a hands-free phone in a car", the regulator might say "Yeah, I'd take your point, we'd do that". And we might disagree about whether or not this is a good idea, or whether or not my evidence made sense, but very few of us would say "well, once you take the hands-free phones out of the car, they stop being cars". We understand that we can keep cars cars even if we remove features from them. Cars are special purpose, at least in comparison to wheels, and all that the addition of a hands-free phone does is add one more feature to an already-specialized technology. In fact, there's that heuristic that we can apply here -- special-purpose technologies are complex. And you can remove features from them without doing fundamental disfiguring violence to their underlying utility.

[[816.5]] This rule of thumb serves regulators well, by and large, but it is rendered null and void by the general-purpose computer and the general-purpose network -- the PC and the Internet. Because if you think of computer software as a feature, that is a computer with spreadsheets running on it has a spreadsheet feature, and one that's running World of Warcraft has an MMORPG feature, then this heuristic leads you to think that you could reasonably say, "make me a computer that doesn't run spreadsheets", and that it would be no more of an attack on computing than "make me a car without a hands-free phone" is an attack on cars. And if you think of protocols and sites as features of the network, then saying "fix the Internet so that it doesn't run BitTorrent", or "fix the Internet so that thepiratebay.org no longer resolves", then it sounds a lot like "change the sound of busy signals", or "take that pizzeria on the corner off the phone network", and not like an attack on the fundamental principles of internetworking.

[[870.5]] Not realizing that this rule of thumb that works for cars and for houses and for every other substantial area of technological regulation fails for the Internet does not make you evil and it does not make you an ignoramus. It just makes you part of that vast majority of the world for whom ideas like "Turing complete" and "end-to-end" are meaningless. So, our regulators go off, and they blithely pass these laws, and they become part of the reality of our technological world. There are suddenly numbers that we aren't allowed to write down on the Internet, programs we're not allowed to publish, and all it takes to make legitimate material disappear from the Internet is to say "that? That infringes copyright." It fails to attain the actual goal of the regulation; it doesn't stop people from violating copyright, but it bears a kind of superficial resemblance to copyright enforcement -- it satisfies the security syllogism: "something must be done, I am doing something, something has been done." And thus any failures that arise can be blamed on the idea that the regulation doesn't go far enough, rather than the idea that it was flawed from the outset.

[[931.2]] This kind of superficial resemblance and underlying divergence happens in other engineering contexts. I've a friend who was once a senior executive at a big consumer packaged goods company who told me about what happened when the marketing department told the engineers that they'd thought up a great idea for detergent: from now on, they were going to make detergent that made your clothes newer every time you washed them! Well after the engineers had tried unsuccessfully to convey the concept of "entropy" to the marketing department [audience laughs], they arrived at another solution -- "solution" -- they'd develop a detergent that used enzymes that attacked loose fiber ends, the kind that you get with broken fibers that make your clothes look old. So every time you washed your clothes in the detergent, they would look newer. But that was because the detergent was literally digesting your clothes! Using it would literally cause your clothes to dissolve in the washing machine! This was the opposite of making clothes newer; instead, you were artificially aging your clothes every time you washed them, and as the user, the more you deployed the "solution", the more drastic your measures had to be to keep your clothes up to date -- you actually had to go buy new clothes because the old ones fell apart.

[[1012.5]] So today we have marketing departments who say things like "we don't need computers, we need... appliances. Make me a computer that doesn't run every program, just a program that does this specialized task, like streaming audio, or routing packets, or playing Xbox games, and make sure it doesn't run programs that I haven't authorized that might undermine our profits". And on the surface, this seems like a reasonable idea -- just a program that does one specialized task -- after all, we can put an electric motor in a blender, and we can install a motor in a dishwasher, and we don't worry if it's still possible to run a dishwashing program in a blender. But that's not what we do when we turn a computer into an appliance. We're not making a computer that runs only the "appliance" app; we're making a computer that can run every program, but which uses some combination of rootkits, spyware, and code-signing to prevent the user from knowing which processes are running, from installing her own software, and from terminating processes that she doesn't want. In other words, an appliance is not a stripped-down computer -- it is a fully functional computer with spyware on it out of the box.

[audience applauds loudly] Thanks.

[[1090.5]] Because we don't know how to build the general purpose computer that is capable of running any program we can compile except for some program that we don't like, or that we prohibit by law, or that loses us money. The closest approximation that we have to this is a computer with spyware -- a computer on which remote parties set policies without the computer user's knowledge, over the objection of the computer's owner. And so it is that digital rights management always converges on malware.

[[1118.9]] There was, of course, this famous incident, a kind of gift to people who have this hypothesis, in which Sony loaded covert rootkit installers on 6 million audio CDs, which secretly executed programs that watched for attempts to read the sound files on CDs, and terminated them, and which also hid the rootkit's existence by causing the kernel to lie about which processes were running, and which files were present on the drive. But it's not the only example; just recently, Nintendo shipped the 3DS, which opportunistically updates its firmware, and does an integrity check to make sure that you haven't altered the old firmware in any way, and if it detects signs of tampering, it bricks itself.

[[1158.8]] Human rights activists have raised alarms over U-EFI, the new PC bootloader, which restricts your computer so it runs signed operating systems, noting that repressive governments will likely withhold signatures from OSes unless they have covert surveillance operations.

[[1175.5]] And on the network side, attempts to make a network that can't be used for copyright infringement always converges with the surveillance measures that we know from repressive governments. So, SOPA, the U.S. Stop Online Piracy Act, bans tools like DNSSec because they can be used to defeat DNS blocking measures. And it blocks tools like Tor, because they can be used to circumvent IP blocking measures. In fact, the proponents of SOPA, the Motion Picture Association of America, circulated a memo, citing research that SOPA would probably work, because it uses the same measures as are used in Syria, China, and Uzbekistan, and they argued that these measures are effective in those countries, and so they would work in America, too!

[audience laughs and applauds] Don't applaud me, applaud the MPAA!

[[1221.5]] Now, it may seem like SOPA is the end game in a long fight over copyright, and the Internet, and it may seem like if we defeat SOPA, we'll be well on our way to securing the freedom of PCs and networks. But as I said at the beginning of this talk, this isn't about copyright, because the copyright wars are just the 0.9 beta version of the long coming war on computation. The entertainment industry were just the first belligerents in this coming century-long conflict. We tend to think of them as particularly successful -- after all, here is SOPA, trembling on the verge of passage, and breaking the internet on this fundamental level in the name of preserving Top 40 music, reality TV shows, and Ashton Kutcher movies! [laughs, scattered applause]

[[1270.2]] But the reality is, copyright legislation gets as far as it does precisely because it's not taken seriously, which is why on one hand, Canada has had Parliament after Parliament introduce one stupid copyright bill after another, but on the other hand, Parliament after Parliament has failed to actually vote on the bill. It's why we got SOPA, a bill composed of pure stupid, pieced together molecule-by-molecule, into a kind of "Stupidite 250", which is normally only found in the heart of newborn star, and it's why these rushed-through SOPA hearings had to be adjourned midway through the Christmas break, so that lawmakers could get into a real vicious nationally-infamous debate over an important issue, unemployment insurance. It's why the World Intellectual Property Organization is gulled time and again into enacting crazed, pig-ignorant copyright proposals because when the nations of the world send their U.N. missions to Geneva, they send water experts, not copyright experts; they send health experts, not copyright experts; they send agriculture experts, not copyright experts, because copyright is just not important to pretty much everyone! [applause]

[[1350.3]] Canada's Parliament didn't vote on its copyright bills because, of all the things that Canada needs to do, fixing copyright ranks well below resolving health emergencies on First Nations reservations, exploiting the oil patch in Alberta, interceding in sectarian resentments among French- and English-speakers, solving resources crises in the nation's fisheries, and a thousand other issues! The triviality of copyright tells you that when other sectors of the economy start to evince concerns about the Internet and the PC, that copyright will be revealed for a minor skirmish, and not a war. Why would other sectors nurse grudges against computers? Well, because the world we live in today is /made/ of computers. We don't have cars anymore, we have computers we ride in; we don't have airplanes anymore, we have flying Solaris boxes with a big bucketful of SCADA controllers [laughter]; a 3D printer is not a device, it's a peripheral, and it only works connected to a computer; a radio is no longer a crystal, it's a general-purpose computer with a fast ADC and a fast DAC and some software.

[[1418.9]] The grievances that arose from unauthorized copying are trivial, when compared to the calls for action that our new computer-embroidered reality will create. Think of radio for a minute. The entire basis for radio regulation up until today was based on the idea that the properties of a radio are fixed at the time of manufacture, and can't be easily altered. You can't just flip a switch on your baby monitor, and turn it into something that interferes with air traffic control signals. But powerful software-defined radios can change from baby monitor to emergency services dispatcher to air traffic controller just by loading and executing different software, which is why the first time the American telecoms regulator (the FCC) considered what would happen when we put SDRs in the field, they asked for comment on whether it should mandate that all software-defined radios should be embedded in trusted computing machines. Ultimately, whether every PC should be locked, so that the programs they run are strictly regulated by central authorities.

[[1477.9]] And even this is a shadow of what is to come. After all, this was the year in which we saw the debut of open sourced shape files for converting AR-15s to full automatic. This was the year of crowd-funded open-sourced hardware for gene sequencing. And while 3D printing will give rise to plenty of trivial complaints, there will be judges in the American South and Mullahs in Iran who will lose their minds over people in their jurisdiction printing out sex toys. [guffaw from audience] The trajectory of 3D printing will most certainly raise real grievances, from solid state meth labs, to ceramic knives.

[[1516.0]] And it doesn't take a science fiction writer to understand why regulators might be nervous about the user-modifiable firmware on self-driving cars, or limiting interoperability for aviation controllers, or the kind of thing you could do with bio-scale assemblers and sequencers. Imagine what will happen the day that Monsanto determines that it's really... really... important to make sure that computers can't execute programs that cause specialized peripherals to output organisms that eat their lunch... literally. Regardless of whether you think these are real problems or merely hysterical fears, they are nevertheless the province of lobbies and interest groups that are far more influential than Hollywood and big content are on their best days, and every one of them will arrive at the same place -- "can't you just make us a general purpose computer that runs all the programs, except the ones that scare and anger us? Can't you just make us an Internet that transmits any message over any protocol between any two points, unless it upsets us?"

[[1576.3]] And personally, I can see that there will be programs that run on general purpose computers and peripherals that will even freak me out. So I can believe that people who advocate for limiting general purpose computers will find receptive audience for their positions. But just as we saw with the copyright wars, banning certain instructions, or protocols, or messages, will be wholly ineffective as a means of prevention and remedy; and as we saw in the copyright wars, all attempts at controlling PCs will converge on rootkits; all attempts at controlling the Internet will converge on surveillance and censorship, which is why all this stuff matters. Because we've spent the last 10+ years as a body sending our best players out to fight what we thought was the final boss at the end of the game, but it turns out it's just been the mini-boss at the end of the level, and the stakes are only going to get higher.

[[1627.8]] As a member of the Walkman generation, I have made peace with the fact that I will require a hearing aid long before I die, and of course, it won't be a hearing aid, it will be a computer I put in my body. So when I get into a car -- a computer I put my body into -- with my hearing aid -- a computer I put inside my body -- I want to know that these technologies are not designed to keep secrets from me, and to prevent me from terminating processes on them that work against my interests. [vigorous applause from audience] Thank you.

[[1669.4]] Thank you. So, last year, the Lower Merion School District, in a middle-class, affluent suburb of Philadelphia found itself in a great deal of trouble, because it was caught distributing PCs to its students, equipped with rootkits that allowed for remote covert surveillance through the computer's camera and network connection. It transpired that they had been photographing students thousands of times, at home and at school, awake and asleep, dressed and naked. Meanwhile, the latest generation of lawful intercept technology can covertly operate cameras, mics, and GPSes on PCs, tablets, and mobile devices.

[[1705.0]] Freedom in the future will require us to have the capacity to monitor our devices and set meaningful policy on them, to examine and terminate the processes that run on them, to maintain them as honest servants to our will, and not as traitors and spies working for criminals, thugs, and control freaks. And we haven't lost yet, but we have to win the copyright wars to keep the Internet and the PC free and open. Because these are the materiel in the wars that are to come, we won't be able to fight on without them. And I know this sounds like a counsel of despair, but as I said, these are early days. We have been fighting the mini-boss, and that means that great challenges are yet to come, but like all good level designers, fate has sent us a soft target to train ourselves on -- we have a organizations that fight for them -- EFF, Bits of Freedom, EDRi, CCC, Netzpolitik, La Quadrature du Net, and all the others, who are thankfully, too numerous to name here -- we may yet win the battle, and secure the ammunition we'll need for the war.

[[1778.9]] Thank you.

[sustained applause]


This could arguably be one possible and maybe even incontrovertible explanation for the seemingly remorseless supplier-push of a plethora of devices like the X-box, iPad, Kindle, Nook and other locked-down embedded computing devices and diversions.

40hz

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #41 on: January 09, 2012, 03:52:51 AM »
I'm glad to see none other than Cory Doctorow agrees with me that THEY are out to eliminate general purpose open computer architectures. I've been harping on that ever since Sony suddenly and arbitrarily revoked the end-user's prior option to put Linux on 'their' new Playstations - and then began enforcing it.

But there is something relatively simple and devastatingly effective that can be done if we are forced to deal with nonsense like SOPA and all the collateral hassles it brings with it.

Stop consuming!

If organizations like the RIAA and MPAA are so convinced of the astronomical value of their products that they feel justified in buying draconian and unfair legislation to prevent what are largely fictional losses, the public can respond by saying: "You're right guys! We no longer want nor can afford your product."

And now comes the important part - don't just stop buying commercial books, movies, and music - completely stop consuming it. Don't borrow it. Don't gift it. Don't bootleg or pirate it. Don't share it. Don't do anything with it.

Stop going to movies. Stop buying or downloading music and videos. Stop getting books. Just reread the books you already own or have loaded on your e-reader. Stop watching TV and listening to the radio for anything other than the news. Let your Netflix and Hulu+ accounts expire for a while. Tell your cable or satellite providers you no longer want any of their movie channels.

In short - say NO to all commercial entertainment. Just walk away with a "Thanks but no thanks!"

Send a very clear message that don't need their product. And most importantly, demonstrate you're able and willing to live without it if you don't like the terms and conditions being offered.

It will probably require about three months before the impact is felt. But when the entertainment and publishing industries suddenly see the revenue streams dwindle to a trickle (no boycott is 100% absolute) - and no increase in piracy picking up the slack - you'll soon see a change of heart. Especially once it becomes clear to them the government won't dare bail out anything as non-essential as their industry.

Not that Uncle Sam could afford to. Because by this time the government will also be feeling a some pain. No sales means no money for paying employees - or business and sales taxes. Jobs might (will) be lost. Plants might shut down. I can hear the governors of affected States screaming blue murder since their unemployment will be going up and their own tax revenues going down because of it.

Next see if Europe will join in. Encourage the general public in places like the UK, France and Spain to stop consuming any US entertainment product until the crazy US government gets its head together and stops bullying their governments into passing similarly insane laws. And then let certain US companies know they will continue to see their products sit on shelves all over Europe until such time as they successfully use their influence to get those same unfair regulations they pushed through overturned.

If it turns into a case of who blinks first, the public has time on its side. None of us will starve or become ill if we can't see a movie, read a book, or listen to a song. But the industry certainly will if you stop consuming their products.

Hopefully they won't see the light. Hopefully they'll just dig in and try to tough it out long enough to eventually go out of business. Lovely thought - no more 'old school' labels or studios - and no more of their lobbyist groups as a result.

With luck, out of the wreckage will come a new media and publishing industry in which the artists, writers, musicians, and performers - in short, the creatives - are finally control. And in which they're able to keep a greater share of the revenue their work has generated.

One of the first rules of economic efficiency is to eliminate the middlemen whenever it's practical to do so.

I think that time has arrived. It's time for the old way of thinking to go away.

And starving an obsolete industry to death is the surest way of making sure necessary changes get made.

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« Last Edit: January 09, 2012, 04:03:30 AM by 40hz »

Carol Haynes

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #42 on: January 09, 2012, 04:12:13 AM »
Nice idea about the worldwide boycott - but can you ever imagining it happen on anything but a token level.

What you forget is that the biggest western disease is the loss of any kind of personal interaction that isn't media based. Sad as it sounds the majority of people are either watching TV or movies or listening to music most of the time and if they aren't they are talking about it. To make this really effective you would also have to stop people going to concerts (which only really exist to increase music sales), going to clubs or any venue where copyrighted music is played in public ... hell you couldn't go to the supermarket! What about sports events - sports have just as draconian attitudes to 'rights' management.

Three days would bring on massive withdrawal symptoms for most people - three months would be like a heroin addict going cold turkey.

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #43 on: January 09, 2012, 04:33:32 AM »
I'm glad to see none other than Cory Doctorow agrees with me that THEY are out to eliminate general purpose open computer architectures. I've been harping on that ever since Sony suddenly and arbitrarily revoked the end-user's prior option to put Linux on 'their' new Playstations - and then began enforcing it.

But there is something relatively simple and devastatingly effective that can be done if we are forced to deal with nonsense like SOPA and all the collateral hassles it brings with it.

Stop consuming!

If organizations like the RIAA and MPAA are so convinced of the astronomical value of their products that they feel justified in buying draconian and unfair legislation to prevent what are largely fictional losses, the public can respond by saying: "You're right guys! We no longer want nor can afford your product."

And now comes the important part - don't just stop buying commercial books, movies, and music - completely stop consuming it. Don't borrow it. Don't gift it. Don't bootleg or pirate it. Don't share it. Don't do anything with it.

Stop going to movies. Stop buying or downloading music and videos. Stop getting books. Just reread the books you already own or have loaded on your e-reader. Stop watching TV and listening to the radio for anything other than the news. Let your Netflix and Hulu+ accounts expire for a while. Tell your cable or satellite providers you no longer want any of their movie channels.

In short - say NO to all commercial entertainment. Just walk away with a "Thanks but no thanks!"

Send a very clear message that don't need their product. And most importantly, demonstrate you're able and willing to live without it if you don't like the terms and conditions being offered.

It will probably require about three months before the impact is felt. But when the entertainment and publishing industries suddenly see the revenue streams dwindle to a trickle (no boycott is 100% absolute) - and no increase in piracy picking up the slack - you'll soon see a change of heart. Especially once it becomes clear to them the government won't dare bail out anything as non-essential as their industry.

Not that Uncle Sam could afford to. Because by this time the government will also be feeling a some pain. No sales means no money for paying employees - or business and sales taxes. Jobs might (will) be lost. Plants might shut down. I can hear the governors of affected States screaming blue murder since their unemployment will be going up and their own tax revenues going down because of it.

Next see if Europe will join in. Encourage the general public in places like the UK, France and Spain to stop consuming any US entertainment product until the crazy US government gets its head together and stops bullying their governments into passing similarly insane laws. And then let certain US companies know they will continue to see their products sit on shelves all over Europe until such time as they successfully use their influence to get those same unfair regulations they pushed through overturned.

If it turns into a case of who blinks first, the public has time on its side. None of us will starve or become ill if we can't see a movie, read a book, or listen to a song. But the industry certainly will if you stop consuming their products.

Hopefully they won't see the light. Hopefully they'll just dig in and try to tough it out long enough to eventually go out of business. Lovely thought - no more 'old school' labels or studios - and no more of their lobbyist groups as a result.

With luck, out of the wreckage will come a new media and publishing industry in which the artists, writers, musicians, and performers - in short, the creatives - are finally control. And in which they're able to keep a greater share of the revenue their work has generated.

One of the first rules of economic efficiency is to eliminate the middlemen whenever it's practical to do so.

I think that time has arrived. It's time for the old way of thinking to go away.

And starving an obsolete industry to death is the surest way of making sure necessary changes get made.
 (see attachment in previous post)



Nice call to action~! :)


Here are a few things to help wean any interested people off of mainstream media productions (in no particular order):


Truth Theory:
A fantastic site that links to all sorts of documentaries that you can watch for free. New videos come out daily. Most videos are on Youtube.

Currently "Ungrip" is on the front page. Great stuff. Highly recommended.


Documentaries Lectures:
Another great site full of all sorts of documentaries and lectures. :) It's very similar to Truth Theory, but simply has different videos. I'd recommend both of these sites. Again, you can watch everything for free. This site kicks! New videos come out daily. Most videos are on Youtube.


Vodo:
Free films from independent film makers. Great stuff there. I've recommended a few from there in various threads here. (Look for "The Third Letter" for a techno-horror future that reinforces why we should have GPL'd software in medicine. Check "Watch Alice Bleed" for a disturbing bit of entertainment -- warning -- it is very disturbing and not for those of a sensitive nature.) Here, everything is on torrent.


RT.com - Russia Today
A fresh approach to news. Not the typical propaganda that you've been used to. If anything, it exposes propaganda in mainstream media. God... I was so happy when I discovered RT...


Alex Jones' sites:
Infowars < Alternative news
Prison Planet < Alternative news
Prison Planet TV < Lots of videos here

Alex has a TONNE (that's metric) of amazing stuff.

Now, here's the kicker... Prison Planet TV requires a subscription... which isn't free... BUT... You can watch pretty much all of it online on Youtube for free. There's more... HE ENCOURAGES PEOPLE TO SHARE HIS VIDEOS. HE WANTS YOU TO "PIRATE" HIS VIDEOS! Well, not pirate... share as it were.

With a subscription, you can share that login/subscription with 5 more people! So, 6 people get to use 1 subscription! And, you can all download everything, upload it to Youtube or burn it to CD/DVD, and share it with as many people as you want!

I *just* bought a subscription, and have given out my login to 3 other people. So, if anyone wants to use it, let me know as I can share with 2 more people. Just PM me or email me. I'll give out the login to the first 2 people I hear from. (I'd only ask that if you decide not to use it, you tell me so that I can give it to someone else.)


Anyways, there are a few non-mainstream media sources for anyone who is interested. I can give out a few more, but those are pretty much the top of my list at the moment.




(Side note: I saw the new "Mission Impossible" the other night. DO NOT bother going to see it. Waste of money. It should have been a made for TV movie. Hollywood is really grasping with this one...)




Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

IainB

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #44 on: January 09, 2012, 05:44:33 AM »
Well, there are precedents for consumer boycotts - similar to what 40hz suggests - that have been tremendously effective. For example, it worked a treat for CAMRA (CAMpaign for Real Ale) in the UK. The big beer combines turned their marketing plans around 180° when they saw how the boycott was causing a slump in UK beer sales and a fall in their share (stock) prices.
I was an early member of CAMRA and recall doing my bit to preserve the beautiful real ales that were going to be expunged.

And when Cadbury-Schweppes started to put Palm Oil into their Cadbury chocolate (which then tasted horrible) as a substitute for the more expensive dairy/cocoa fats, the subsequent outrage and boycott by Cadbury fans made them change their minds PDQ.
(Which reminds me, I bought some Nestle Caramac today, telling my daughter how yummy it used to be. Yech! Yes, it contained "Vegetable Fat" - aka Palm Oil.)

Internet users are a huge, relatively well-informed and interconnected population.
We've already seen how Internet users can rise to the occasion over the Paul Christoforo Ocean Marketing emails and GoDaddy's support of SOPA. If there was an even bigger and worthy cause at stake (e.g., the preservation of the integrity of the Internet), then you could expect an equally massive swing of clever collaboration and protest about DRM being used to kill the 'net.

Maybe we need a "Boycott DRM Media proponents" Facebook page?

IainB

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #45 on: January 10, 2012, 04:44:44 AM »
Interesting post at Slashdot: Inside the Great Firewall of China's Tor Blocking
Quote
Inside the Great Firewall of China's Tor Blocking
by Unknown Lamer

Trailrunner7 writes with an article at Threat Post about China's ability to block Tor. From the article: "The much-discussed Great Firewall of China is meant to prevent Chinese citizens from getting to Web sites and content that the country's government doesn't approve of, and it's been endowed with some near-mythical powers by observers over the years. But it's somewhat rare to get a look at the way that the system actually works in practice. Researchers at Team Cymru got just that recently when they were asked by the folks at the Tor Project to help investigate why a user in China was having his connections to a bridge relay outside of China terminated so quickly. Not only is China able to identify Tor sessions, it can do so in near real-time and then probe the Tor bridge relay and terminate the session within a couple of minutes."

And this could be useful: "Save the Internet.com"

JavaJones

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #46 on: January 12, 2012, 11:09:26 PM »
I reckon perhaps more effective than an outright boycott would be a massive move over to independent media. After all, with a sudden drop-off of sales and no corresponding rise in other legitimate media business, they can just claim piracy has had a huge jump and they need even more draconian laws to handle it.

- Oshyan

40hz

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #47 on: January 13, 2012, 03:37:54 PM »

wantyou.jpg

So much for bullying other countries into passing laws. Now it seem the US has sold the UK on enforcing US laws as well.

This news just in time for Friday the 13th:

Quote
‘Guinea pig’ extradition case sets dangerous precedent for pirating Britons

By Zack Whittaker | January 13, 2012, 7:41am PST

Summary: British citizens can now be extradited to the United States based on a ‘guinea pig’ case regarding the alleged infringement of copyrighted works.

Link to full article here.

 :-\

40hz

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #48 on: January 13, 2012, 03:42:27 PM »
I reckon perhaps more effective than an outright boycott would be a massive move over to independent media. After all, with a sudden drop-off of sales and no corresponding rise in other legitimate media business, they can just claim piracy has had a huge jump and they need even more draconian laws to handle it.

- Oshyan

All the more reason why you need to stop consuming. Pirating just plays into their hands.

And alternate indy isn't really viable as a method for sending a message. They'll just keep harassing indies and passing laws until they eliminate them. That's how they got a fee put on audio cassettes. All blanks in the US had a tariff (something like 50¢ each) that got paid back to the recording industry to compensate the for the losses to piracy the music industry 'just knew' were taking place.

You need to kill these people before they get laws passed that makes DRM mandatory for all media. BEcause once that happens they'll be able to survive indefinitely just by licensing that technology.

To defeat big media, you need to put them out of business in a clear and true capitalist fashion such that it gives them no grounds to go running to the government begging for intervention.

Starve them to death. It's the only way. 8)

superboyac

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Re: "Save the internet"
« Reply #49 on: January 13, 2012, 04:05:51 PM »
Wow!  That Cory Doctorow stuff is excellent!  So juicy.  I loved reading that.  I love hearing from people explain things with such clarity.