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Author Topic: How IBM started grading its developers' productivity  (Read 1179 times)

IainB

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How IBM started grading its developers' productivity
« on: November 09, 2011, 03:16:41 AM »
I wonder what DC forum members might make of this.
To me it looks like it is either a regression to the archaic methods of Taylorism, or - more likely - a marketing puff for something called the Cast development platform.
How IBM started grading its developers' productivity

Renegade

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Re: How IBM started grading its developers' productivity
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2011, 06:40:16 AM »
Not sure. It sounds all rosy, but then again, roses have thorns too...
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IainB

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Re: How IBM started grading its developers' productivity
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2011, 11:07:53 PM »
This what you get when you carry Taylorism to its logical perfection in the "motivational" feedback of employee productivity:
Steve Lopez: Disneyland workers answer to 'electronic whip'

I suspect that this may be what is implied by the use of the term "motivation", in the IBM/Cast article.

Yep, let's go back to what was already an obsolete school of thought by the 1930s.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2011, 11:12:58 PM by IainB »