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Author Topic: What are good sunglasses (brands)?  (Read 5227 times)
superboyac
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« on: July 19, 2011, 01:23:23 PM »

I don't know much about sunglasses.  I bought about a $100 RayBan last year, which was the most expensive sunglasses I've ever purchased.  I liked it, but I was disappointed in several build quality aspects.  The ear pieces were very cheap and started breaking apart quickly.  So what are some good sunglasses?  I don't care about name brand, but I do want it to be built well and look pretty good.  Are there any brands known for being built well?  Like, what is the German car of sunglasses?  And I don't want it to be too crazy expensive.  Thanks!
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cranioscopical
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« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2011, 01:29:08 PM »

Why not see what your local optician can do for you? You'll get a good fit and, probably, a better choice of frames. I still have a pair that were made for me years ago.
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Chris
superboyac
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« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2011, 01:38:05 PM »

Why not see what your local optician can do for you? You'll get a good fit and, probably, a better choice of frames. I still have a pair that were made for me years ago.
Hmm...I didn't even know that was an option.  Thanks!
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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2011, 04:55:27 PM »

Why not see what your local optician can do for you? You'll get a good fit and, probably, a better choice of frames. I still have a pair that were made for me years ago.

Having managed an optical lab for 5 years back when, that was my first thought too ... But Ya beat me to it. It's definitely the best way to get a good pair of quality custom sunglasses. Just pick a favorite frame (or bring one with if you got it), and have them tint the lenses to whatever color you want! Or get Polaroids.

Just avoid the AR coating, it's expensive as hell and hard to keep clean. Most people end up having it removed, and there is a charge for that...
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Renegade
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« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2011, 06:46:36 PM »

I like Oakleys. The frames bend nicely around my face, and keep out that 'edge-sun'. They're nutty expensive, but... They FIT amazingly well. Do go try out a pair, even if you don't plan on buying them. They'll give you a nice feel for what a curved set of frames can mean for a proper fit. (Not all face-shapes will be amicable to them, but it's worth a shot.)

Some Oakleys are god-awful tacky. But they do have some very nice ones as well. These aren't the ones I have, but they're the type that I'd go for:



The problem with cheap sunglasses is that you never really know if they're properly polarized or not. If they're simply 'dark', then that will actually allow more damaging light (from those parts of the spectrum) into your eyes than should be, which can damage your sight.

The solution there is to buy from a reputable brand, and pay through the nose. OR, as noted above, to go get a custom pair from your optician, who SHOULD know properly what lenses properly filter out the UV light that can damage your eye-sight.

Either way -- you want to make sure that you aren't damaging your eye-sight with 'dark' glasses that don't filter the right spectrum.

I've also had a nice pair of CKs that I rather liked. Those got stolen. Oh well. (The next set were Oakleys that I lost on a bus in Thailand. They got replaced with another set of Oakleys as I liked their fit so much.)
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steeladept
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« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2011, 06:59:50 PM »

I found my favorite sunglasses at HomeDepot, believe it or not.  Go to their safety glasses section and there are at least 10 different styles, colors, etc to choose from.  Best of all, most are polarized, meet ANSI regulations as safety glasses, and under $25.  You don't get the customized options of an optician's office, or name brand anything (so they are less likely to be taken), but I find them comfortable, cheap, and generally excellent for my uses.
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NigelH
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« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2011, 09:04:34 PM »

I used to swear by Zeiss sunglasses (glass, of course)
These days though, I'm too hard on my sunglasses, so it's really a case of whatever is good enough (for me).
i.e. 100% UVA A & B, polarized, NO distortion, comfortable (of course) and brown lenses

I just bought a pair of Costco (Kirkland) Polarized Sunglasses for about $30
Very light, very comfortable - no distortion etc as above
Someone commented here about them here cruisersforum

Another over here
Maui Jim H407 407-02 Hookipa Sport Sunglasses
Referring to these (which look exactly like what I bought at Costco)
Maui-Jim-Hookipa-Sport-Sunglasses



Costco also has a few RayBans for about $75.
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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2011, 10:32:59 PM »

The problem with cheap sunglasses is that you never really know if they're properly polarized or not. If they're simply 'dark', then that will actually allow more damaging light (from those parts of the spectrum) into your eyes than should be, which can damage your sight.

Oh hell man, that's the easy part. Polarized Lenses 101:

Hold the glasses level out in front of you and look through the lenses. Now while looking through the lenses, rotate the glasses 90 degrees ... The view should get brighter. If it don't, the the lenses ain't polarized. And if they get darker when you turn them sideways, them somebody cut the lenses off axis (and yes that is different than the prescription's optical axis).
End of test. Wink

The UV protection on glasses (that they charge top dollar for...) is really just a 2min dip coating, which can be done to any lens.
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superboyac
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« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2011, 11:28:06 PM »

These are all pretty good suggestions.  I like the Costco suggestion, definitely am going to check that out.  Here's what I like in glasses: glass lens, metal frame.  I have a narrow face, which excludes most frames.
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Renegade
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« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2011, 01:08:22 AM »

Ah! I have a picture of mine here:

http://www.donationcoder....25127.msg239269#msg239269

I like having one of those cord-thingies so I can drop them on my chest or just not worry about losing them. (Frig... I know what they're called in Korean, and can't think for the life of me what the English is...)

You can get nice ones that don't look all "grannyish".

Just one of those accessories that I find useful with glasses.
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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2011, 06:45:28 AM »

Here's what I like in glasses: glass lens, metal frame.  I have a narrow face, which excludes most frames.

While I understand the glass lenses seem more appealing, you really are better off with the standard CR39 (plastic) lenses. Glass lenses have to be thick(er) for safety reasons (read quite heavy) because of their tendancy to shatter. The CR39 lenses have excellent optical quality and only require a 3mm center thickness (e.g. are quite lite) to pass as OSHA approved safety glasses.

It's also next to impossible to find anyone with the proper skills to cut, edge, & heat treat (it's a bit of a bitch) the glass lenses properly these days.
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steeladept
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« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2011, 06:45:10 PM »

Here's what I like in glasses: glass lens, metal frame.  I have a narrow face, which excludes most frames.

That would leave out my suggestion then smiley

My suggestion (safety glasses) are plastic frame and plastic lens. 
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superboyac
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« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2011, 07:13:54 PM »

OK, I can let go of the glass requirement.  But I still prefer metal frames.  I don't like the super light sunglasses...they always feel like they're just magically floating around my head.  I like to have some weight to it.
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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2011, 07:49:14 PM »

OK, I can let go of the glass requirement.  But I still prefer metal frames.  I don't like the super light sunglasses...they always feel like they're just magically floating around my head.  I like to have some weight to it.

Me too.  Thmbsup
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Deozaan
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« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2011, 08:37:25 PM »

What about if you already have/wear prescription glasses? Is the advice all the same? Or does that change things at all?

I currently have prescription glasses with transition lenses. I like them, but since these are my first pair of glasses ever I didn't really know what I was doing and I got glasses with the frame and lenses too small. And since I'm wearing them all the time they give me a headache (so I end up not wearing them all the time if I can help it).

I think I'd prefer as light weight as possible, ultra padded/soft on the nose and ears. And really big lenses that cover as much of my field of vision as possible so I can see wherever I look without having to point my face directly at what I'm looking at to get it within the lense frame.
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Renegade
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« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2011, 09:56:36 PM »

I think I'd prefer as light weight as possible, ultra padded/soft on the nose and ears. And really big lenses that cover as much of my field of vision as possible so I can see wherever I look without having to point my face directly at what I'm looking at to get it within the lense frame.

+1 there.

I don't like heavy. I like them to be as invisible as possible.

As for large lenses, I don't like them large, but that's why I like my Oakleys so much. They curve nicely around my face so I don't need large lenses. There isn't much space at the edges where I can look "outside" the sunglasses.

It's a different solution for the same problem. Curved frames vs. large lenses.
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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2011, 10:51:23 PM »

What about if you already have/wear prescription glasses? Is the advice all the same? Or does that change things at all?

For the most part yes, but it can depend on the level of correction/prescription as to what type of frame works best (durability wise). Drill mounts tend to break easily with higher corrective prescriptions. They're also god awful delicate. Rimless frames suffer some of the same issues with chipping if the edges aren't beveled (and grooved) properly. Personally I like a lightweight metal frame because I still like to play mechanic from time to time.


I currently have prescription glasses with transition lenses. I like them, but since these are my first pair of glasses ever I didn't really know what I was doing and I got glasses with the frame and lenses too small. And since I'm wearing them all the time they give me a headache (so I end up not wearing them all the time if I can help it).

Transitions are a UV sensitive CR39 (plastic) lenses (that don't change well in the car because the factory windshields block UV. Photo-gray lenses are glass. So if you do have transitions, you shouldn't have a weight problem there.

Any issues with depth perception? The PD (Pupilary Distance) Optical center of the lenses has to match your eyes, or you will have a constant draw that causes eye strain. Or if you have a astigmatism and the lens is off axis, that will cause headaches also.


I think I'd prefer as light weight as possible, ultra padded/soft on the nose and ears. And really big lenses that cover as much of my field of vision as possible so I can see wherever I look without having to point my face directly at what I'm looking at to get it within the lens frame.

You don't want to go too big and end up with out-of-fashion BCGs (Birth Control Glasses...). Chances are, being your first pair you may have fiddled with them a bit to much from not being used to having them on your face (it happens). Or maybe they were just not fitted properly when you originally got them. Adjusting the frames to properly fit a persons face comfortably is an art.

I do understand what you mean about not wanting to have to turn your head all the time. I'm in my 2nd pair of progressives (no-line bifocals), and I absolutely hate them, because the corners blur due to the extra reading add power curves. But it kills my neck to have to keep wagging my head to look beside me.

While I don't know how small your small frames are, I do think if you went in and had them re-adjust the fit they'd annoy you a lot less. Nose pads should never be painful (even the cheap ones) if adjusted properly.

Might not hurt to have the prescription verified also - Do make a point to mention the headaches. Eyeglass prescriptions are only good for 2 years.

Side Note: Renegades tip about the wrap-around style frames is a good one. We used to put perscription lenses in those frames for people all the time and never had any complaints. I was just never quite hip enough for Oakleys, and tended to go for the 70's style avaitor frames...Or something in a (non-Harry Potter) medium round.
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Deozaan
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« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2011, 04:14:01 AM »

While I don't know how small your small frames are, I do think if you went in and had them re-adjust the fit they'd annoy you a lot less. Nose pads should never be painful (even the cheap ones) if adjusted properly.

I was bargain hunting. There was a deal where certain frames were really cheap but I didn't like the look (or feel) of any of them. Then I found some that seemed to fit okay and I thought looked good. Turns out I had somehow meandered into the "youth" section. But they felt fine at the time and they were the only ones I liked, so my frames are "youth" sized. After wearing them a while I feel like they squeeze my head too tightly near my ears but also the weight of them on my nose starts bothering me as well.

I think I may just be really sensitive to stuff on myself. I can never stand to wear bracelets, a necklace, or a watch. Wearing over the head earphones hurts my ears, and in-ear earphones hurt the inside of my ear. So yeah, this constant downward pressure on the bridge of my nose starts to hurt after a while. And the frame "arms" squeezing my head just behind my temples is what really hurts.

Any issues with depth perception?

Not that I'm aware of. At least not without glasses.

I think I'd prefer as light weight as possible, ultra padded/soft on the nose and ears. And really big lenses that cover as much of my field of vision as possible so I can see wherever I look without having to point my face directly at what I'm looking at to get it within the lens frame.

You don't want to go too big and end up with out-of-fashion BCGs (Birth Control Glasses...). Chances are, being your first pair you may have fiddled with them a bit to much from not being used to having them on your face (it happens). Or maybe they were just not fitted properly when you originally got them. Adjusting the frames to properly fit a persons face comfortably is an art.

I don't necessarily want those huge, thick lenses like those of BCGs, but what I really hate is after wearing my glasses for a long time, I take them off and I can close my eyes and see the "boxes" of the frames around the lenses. It makes me feel like I have tunnel vision. Except instead of being round tunnels it's more like a thin, wide rectangle (think Cyclops of X-Men).

I think I'd probably be fine with frames that are a bit larger vertically than mine are, and also curved around the side of my head. Basically I just want as much of my viewing area to be covered by the lenses so I can comfortably look with my eyes instead of my head. This is especially important when in leisurely or awkward positions (e.g. laying down or contorting into a strange position try to reach something behind a refrigerator, etc.).

I also don't like how the world bends and distorts as I move my head around. It's weird.

And one more problem I have: My eyelashes are kind of long I guess, and they often brush up against the inside of any glasses I ever try on. Ever. So annoying!

What I really want is LASIK with transition/UV/polarized lenses. Wink

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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2011, 06:55:32 AM »

I had a funny feeling about the youth frames, but didn't want to say anything ... Whoever did the fitting should have caught that instead of just rushing through the sale. mad

If you can find a competent optician, they should be able to properly adjust the frames to properly fit you face. Which would (obviously) also require extending the nose pads a bit to accommodate you eyelashes.

If "The world is bending and distorting", (assuming a non bi-focal single vision prescription) the lenses are probably buckled (cut wrong). And being that it sounds like they botched everything else ... They probably are.

(OTOH) Contacts may be a better option if you can handle sticking something in your eye (I can't).
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superboyac
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« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2011, 10:05:29 AM »

Ok ok...we're getting close here...

So, i like this idea of picking the frame from Costco or wherever you get your regular eyeglasses from.  Now, other than Costco and Kaiser, where would be a good place to check out a large variety of frames?  I'd really like to see what is out there.  I also like the idea of not getting name brand stuff and just getting something that may not be known very well, but is solidly built and so forth.  Kind of like the suits I get.
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Stoic Joker
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« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2011, 11:43:44 AM »

Any of the optical shops in your area should have a fair selection of decent frames. I've also seen some quality eyeglass frames at flea-markets - Usually from an optical shop that was dumping old stock (which a friend of mine does). They're brand new, top dollar, high quality, frames that just sat on the display shelf too long without selling.

Note: An eyeglass frame that you would typically pay $300 for, actually only cost the store about $10 to put it on the shelf. The markup is astronomical because they have to sit on so many frames hoping that somebody will like one well enough to buy it.
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Deozaan
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« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2011, 03:45:43 PM »

(OTOH) Contacts may be a better option if you can handle sticking something in your eye (I can't).

I wore contacts for years until suddenly I started getting constant/frequent "eye boogers" and the optometrist recommended I start wearing glasses instead.

The eye boogers were bad. In the morning I'd wake up and my eyelids would be "sealed" shut because the goop had hardened in my eyelashes along the whole length of my eyelids and I'd have to spend a minute or two pulling the crusty stuff off before I could open my eyes. And all day long I was constantly digging the "sand" out of my tear ducts. It just would not stop forming when I had contacts in.

So now I just dream about LASIK. cheesy
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steeladept
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« Reply #22 on: July 24, 2011, 02:16:20 AM »

I know what you mean Deo.  I went for a complimentary LASIK exam to see if I was fit for it, though, and they were able to provide some sort of medicine that stopped the "eye boogers"  I had issues like yours, though not as frequently - and the doctor said the medicine would clear it up.  Unfortunately, I never got back to the contacts to verify that it did, because I couldn't afford them anymore (kids take all my money anymore undecided); but I can say I didn't even get the little "sleep seeds" that come even with glasses.  As for wrapping perscription lenses, I haven't seen or heard of any successful designs for that - it just doesn't seem to keep the focus needed where and when it is needed.  Other than that, I can agree wholeheartedly with everything you said.

As a side note, when I did wear contacts, the HomeDepot Safety glasses I got were great.  They wrap around well, are very lightweight, and generally comfortable.  I could even wear them with my motorcycle helmet on - something even my glasses have issues with.  That is particularly nice, because then I don't need to carry 2 visors with me wherever I go.
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