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Last post Author Topic: Do universities have a claim on students' IP?  (Read 4479 times)

Renegade

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Re: Do universities have a claim on students' IP?
« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2011, 05:27:11 PM »
And it's also important to remember that courts are "courts of law." They're not debating societies or forums for public opinion.

In the US, that's the function of the legislature - not the judiciary.

BWahahaha~! :D

(I like that!)
Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

wraith808

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Re: Do universities have a claim on students' IP?
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2011, 05:30:47 PM »
Since a state university -- as in this case -- is funded by the state's taxpayers, which the student is, shouldn't the school make public all its IT? Ah, that slippery slope.

State Universities are subsidized by the state, not solely funded.  There is a distinction. :)

40hz

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Re: Do universities have a claim on students' IP?
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2011, 07:19:28 PM »
And it's also important to remember that courts are "courts of law." They're not debating societies or forums for public opinion.

In the US, that's the function of the legislature - not the judiciary.

BWahahaha~! :D

(I like that!)

It's not just funny.  It's true.

Courts work off a Q&A style procedure. You're allowed to ask a question, answer a question, or respond to the bench. You're not allowed to get into philosophical debates or make a speech. Try doing that and the judge will cut you off short. Do it one time too many and he'll also likely cut you off at the knees.

Courts are there to interpret the law - not to create new law. While it has happened from time to time, it's a controversial issue usually dubbed "legislating from the bench." And it's generally viewed as a violation of the doctrine of separation of powers.

The Senate and Congress on the other hand are debating societies in every sense of the word. Once you have the floor in either chamber you're free to wax as poetic and philosophical as you will for as long as you like. You're only limited by the stamina of your voice; the strength of your legs (you're required to stand when addressing the chair for obvious reasons); and possibly by the capacity of your bladder if you're male and over 50.

Read The Constitution of the United States for further details. Free copies of which can be found in wastebaskets conveniently located throughout the US Capitol Building and White House.   :P

« Last Edit: January 25, 2011, 07:24:35 PM by 40hz »

Renegade

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Re: Do universities have a claim on students' IP?
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2011, 07:43:38 PM »
Read The Constitution of the United States for further details. Free copies of which can be found in wastebaskets conveniently located throughout the US Capitol Building and White House.   :P

Ah! Thanks for the tip there! I would have ended up wasting time looking for used toilet paper~! :P :D

But while I may not have found the Constitution, I likely would have found copies of the Bill of Rights... :P
Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker