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Last post Author Topic: How to program for all 3 platforms at once  (Read 8245 times)

Renegade

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2010, 07:18:15 PM »
Isn't this the purported goal of Mono?

This is the route that I'm going. But Java and RealBasic are also viable.

Some people are using Python for desktop software. Seen some and it looks ok.

I think the component market is one of the most important though. I'd rather buy functionality that performs better than I could do from experts in the field than fart around trying to half-ass it. C# and Java have good component markets, but I really don't know how the Java desktop component market is. Anyone know?
Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

def

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #26 on: December 16, 2010, 02:14:37 PM »
I've heard Adobe AIR mentioned a lot lately.  What code does it use?  Java?

As far as I can tell, AIR supports different technologies, so the developer can use the one that he is most familar with:

  • Flash Player (the developer can use Flash Builder, formerly known as Flex)
  • HTML/CSS/JavaScript (rendered using the WebKit engine)
  • PDF. However, I heard the PDF support in AIR is weak.

CodeTRUCKER

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #27 on: January 03, 2011, 05:48:36 PM »
^ Just DL'ed the 30-day trial.

I'd be interested in hearing from anybody who uses it too.  :)

I downloaded too.  Looks pretty interesting, since I have a soft spot in my head, er, heart for Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code.  :-*

I am glad they have a 90-day money back policy.  :deal:  

It is also fairly expensive, , but one of the customers by the name of Jeff Ayling said, ""Love you guys - what a product! Your hard work now feeds my family!"

@Carol, please keep me in your loop.  I would be specifically interested in how it compares to VB, if you can comment. - Thanks.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2011, 11:49:17 AM by CodeTRUCKER »

kyrathaba

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #28 on: January 03, 2011, 06:11:13 PM »
CodeTRUCKER, I'm interested in your experience.  Please report after you've fooled with it awhile :)  Also, I still think with your background in BASIC, the ideal next language for you would be Visual Basic .NET (freely available here).  You can do 99.9% of anything you can envision, programming-task-wise, perhaps with the exception of very intensive graphics programming (although .NET languages are supporting OpenGL and DirectX) and writing very low-level routines.


steeladept

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #29 on: January 03, 2011, 06:13:40 PM »
I think the component market is one of the most important though. I'd rather buy functionality that performs better than I could do from experts in the field than fart around trying to half-ass it. C# and Java have good component markets, but I really don't know how the Java desktop component market is. Anyone know?
I know that it exists, and that is kind of saying something since I am not a programmer - well not really anyway  ;).  I can't talk to the quality of it, however.  I have a few vendors that send me info on it at work because they know my company is a Java shop and they send their advertising to anyone who has an email in that domain.  It is annoying because I don't know how they got my email - my guess is I downloaded a white-paper or something - but they do stop when I send the request to stop, so I can't complain too much.  I just wish companies would stop advertising these white-papers that are just advertisements themselves, then force you to register just to find out that it is an advertisement.  I have stopped getting any white-papers I need to register for because of that. >:(

Renegade

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2011, 07:19:29 PM »
CodeTRUCKER, I'm interested in your experience.  Please report after you've fooled with it awhile :)  Also, I still think with your background in BASIC, the ideal next language for you would be Visual Basic .NET (freely available here).  You can do 99.9% of anything you can envision, programming-task-wise, perhaps with the exception of very intensive graphics programming (although .NET languages are supporting OpenGL and DirectX) and writing very low-level routines.

+1 for VB.NET. It's quite nice to use.

Quite right about the low-level stuff. You simply can't do it in VB.NET. No pointers. C# is a better choice because it is possible, but depending on the application, plain C or ASM or something would be better.

VB.NET is a very forgiving language as well. If you're coming from Pascal-based languages, it will look somewhat familiar. (In the way that C# is 'familiar' for Java developers.)


Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

kyrathaba

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2011, 07:52:40 PM »
And... there is plenty of helpful material out there for learning, both in books and in free online material.

Ron88888

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #32 on: January 03, 2011, 09:05:41 PM »
Interesting page at lifehacker.com:
http://lifehacker.co...g-beginners-for-free

Windows and Mac OS X: Hackety Hack is an application designed to teach complete beginners how to program in Ruby, eventually giving you the ability to create actual applications for the desktop and the web.
The Hackety Hack project also makes use of a GUI toolkit called Shoes, which lets you create desktop applications.
Hackety Hack will walk you through Ruby basics and have you creating simple apps quickly. The Shoes toolkit isn't just for making simple apps. Once you learn the basics that Hackety Hack will teach you, then you can start creating more complex apps (like Hackety Hack itself). If you're looking to get into programming and want to deploy cross-platform apps, Hackety Hack looks like a great way to get started. It's also free, open source software, so you can mess around with the source code should you feel so inclined.

In the comments, someone says:
Note: it does have experimental Linux support.

mahesh2k

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2011, 01:07:55 AM »
Some better options than java-

BASIC  - Mono.net (Visualbasic.net), Gambas, Borlands basic(don't know where they are now)

Python - Ironpython(which works on all platforms with .NET framework)

C# - using mono

Wxwidgets is also used by some people to code cross-platform but learning curve is steep. QT has some license issues for commercial apps so no point in investing time with them.

Edit - ron, tested ruby shoes it's small GUI tookit and there isn't much in it. But for web based desktop apps can still be coded with it.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2011, 01:11:35 AM by mahesh2k »

Renegade

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #34 on: January 06, 2011, 01:12:47 AM »
Some better options than java-

BASIC  - Mono.net (Visualbasic.net), Gambas, Borlands basic(don't know where they are now)

Python - Ironpython(which works on all platforms with .NET framework)

C# - using mono

Wxwidgets is also used by some people to code cross-platform but learning curve is steep. QT has some license issues for commercial apps so no point in investing time with them.

Edit - ron, tested ruby shoes it's small GUI tookit and there isn't much in it. But for web based desktop apps can still be coded with it.

QT allows licensing as LGPL, which is fine for commercial development.
Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

mahesh2k

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #35 on: January 06, 2011, 01:21:33 AM »
Quote
QT allows licensing as LGPL, which is fine for commercial development.

Does LGPL allows developers to restrict source-code distribution ? Sorry, i'm not much aware of it's legal sides.

mwb1100

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #36 on: January 06, 2011, 01:57:39 AM »
Quote
QT allows licensing as LGPL, which is fine for commercial development.

Does LGPL allows developers to restrict source-code distribution ? Sorry, i'm not much aware of it's legal sides.

LGPL allows you to release your program without having to distribute *your* source code.  However, you have to provide the source code for the LGPL bits (ie., the Qt library).  You also have to enable/allow people to modify, rebuild and relink the LGPL bits into the program.  Practically speaking, this means that you have to link to the LGPL stuff dynamically (using a DLL on Windows, or a shared library on Linux).  That way, end users could rebuild Qt and replace the DLL if they're so inclined.

Jibz

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2011, 03:04:09 AM »
Just to add to the discussion:

http://blog.kowalczy...esktop-software.html

CodeTRUCKER

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Re: How to program for all 3 platforms at once
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2011, 04:41:38 PM »
And here's another...

http://www.runrev.com

... and a little information in another post.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2011, 04:44:24 PM by CodeTRUCKER »