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Last post Author Topic: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?  (Read 18394 times)

doctorfrog

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #50 on: October 04, 2010, 04:20:32 PM »
I currently work at a pretty decent tech company staffed with intelligent, nice, hardworking people, and most of them are absolutely glued to their iPhones. If there's a spare second on an elevator ride or five seconds wait in a line, they're staring at that little screen.

I bet they're much more productive for it, I really do, because of the connectivity of the thing, and all the miracles you can accomplish with it. But me, when I step away from my desk, I'm done looking at screens, and I'm done working for the five minutes it takes for a bathroom break or a wait in line for coffee. Email can wait, text messages can wait, the whole business can wait until I get back to my chair. I don't need constant updates of everything.

And I have absolutely no interest in cute little apps made for those 30-second stretches of time. Good god man, I don't have many thoughts in my head, but the ones I have there, I'm pretty grateful for. Video games, video streaming, and constant internet activity have driven me to crave distraction, I don't need anymore stuff calling for my attention!

And I'm kind of sad about this, because I feel like I'm lacking compared to these people.

superboyac

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #51 on: October 04, 2010, 05:09:29 PM »
I currently work at a pretty decent tech company staffed with intelligent, nice, hardworking people, and most of them are absolutely glued to their iPhones. If there's a spare second on an elevator ride or five seconds wait in a line, they're staring at that little screen.

I bet they're much more productive for it, I really do, because of the connectivity of the thing, and all the miracles you can accomplish with it. But me, when I step away from my desk, I'm done looking at screens, and I'm done working for the five minutes it takes for a bathroom break or a wait in line for coffee. Email can wait, text messages can wait, the whole business can wait until I get back to my chair. I don't need constant updates of everything.

And I have absolutely no interest in cute little apps made for those 30-second stretches of time. Good god man, I don't have many thoughts in my head, but the ones I have there, I'm pretty grateful for. Video games, video streaming, and constant internet activity have driven me to crave distraction, I don't need anymore stuff calling for my attention!

And I'm kind of sad about this, because I feel like I'm lacking compared to these people.
I wouldn't say you are sad.  You are not missing on any true experiences because you are not completely mobile with your computing.  In fact, I would argue exactly the opposite.  THEY are missing out on real experiences by needing to be glued to their phones.  I saw this quote in a forum related to this:
"Facebook is to socializing, what masturbation is to sex."

You see, most people think that more efficiency always means better.  But that is not true.  I even remember seeing a Droid commercial this weekend where they had some guys arms turn into robotic arms as soon as he touched the Droid phone, and they touted that the Droid will turn you into an "efficiency machine" or something along those lines.  I thought the whole idea was very sad.

There's something that is truly human about being able to enjoy the "absurd" pleasures of life (as my friend likes to say).  We are not robots.  There's nothing efficient about sitting in a canyon and staring at the view in front of you.  But it's beautiful.  That's because efficiency is not beautiful.  There's nothing efficient about watching a 3+ hour opera called the Marriage of Figaro.  But it's beautiful.

There's nothing beautiful about constantly texting forgettable phrases back and forth for the rest of your life.  but it sure is efficient...I suppose.

superboyac

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #52 on: October 04, 2010, 05:12:26 PM »
FYI, I went to my annual John Pizzarelli concert a few weeks ago with some friends.  He comes once a year here, and I go every year.  One of my friends, throughout the whole concert, was secretly texting back and forth on his phone.  During songs, in between breaks...the whole time.  He didn't go more than 2 minutes without looking at his phone, which means he didn't listen to any song all the way through.  So between he and I:
Who was more efficient?
Who was more human?
Who experienced true human pleasure?
Who noticed something beautiful?

Eóin

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #53 on: October 04, 2010, 05:43:07 PM »
There's nothing beautiful about constantly texting forgettable phrases back and forth for the rest of your life.  but it sure is efficient...I suppose.

If you're talking inane status updates or comments on Facebook or Twitter, well I completely agree. But people who are constantly glued to their phones texting friends and family are doing as good a job of socializing as everyone else, assuming you also see those friends and family an odd time.

Sure you don't want to miss the real world, but for most humans, after survival, socializing is the biggest part of real world. Who's to say that's wrong.

Dormouse

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #54 on: October 05, 2010, 12:10:55 AM »
To do anything truly productive I want desktop apps - for me the way to go, out and about, is a netbook with a proper OS and applications and VPN to my desktop (just got a Samsung NS210 and it is really nice to use - esp. as i added extra memory, Win 7 Professional and Office 2010 Pro Plus).

IMHO smartphone apps are only really suitable for picking up mail and making a quick response if you have to - and other apps are useful for opening the odd document but who would really want to use a Blackberry or iPhone as a wordprocessor?

Indeed.
But this is very much from a work related POV, and I don't think that is the point of apps, iPhone or Android. Not that they're necessarily worse at it than WM, Blackberry et al.
And I've never found any computer (laptop or netbook) that useful for being out of the office - startup/close times are just too slow; not a problem for those who want to use them for less frequent and longer periods. And smartphones are perfectly OK for email.

Dormouse

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #55 on: October 05, 2010, 12:21:09 AM »
And everything you do is, of course, collected on their central database.

Source?

Any app can be downloaded to as many devices as you want (well - not sure about that.  Currently my apps are on my iPhone, my wife's iPhone, my old iPod touch which my son has, and my iPad... so at least 4), and if there is a + beside the price, you get the HD and the regular version for the same cost.

Songs on the other hand... you can only get those to another device if you d/l then u/l them, i.e. I d/l a song on my iPhone, then did the same on my wife's, and it charged me twice.  I can, however, d/l it, then sync, then copy it to my wife's computer, then she syncs and it be on both devices... if that isn't strange, I don't know what is...

You can't do this without a database linking your data (songs etc), hardware and customer info.

I'm not implying that they collect other data (I've no idea whether they do or not). Clearly their systems aren't good enough to detect the copying from one computer to another.

wraith808

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #56 on: October 05, 2010, 09:36:45 AM »
You can't do this without a database linking your data (songs etc), hardware and customer info.

I'm not implying that they collect other data (I've no idea whether they do or not). Clearly their systems aren't good enough to detect the copying from one computer to another.

Actually, they do.  They use a hardware key in regards to music... that's the DRM part.  But that's DRM in general- they have to have *something* to lock it to, and in most cases hardware (and an account in the case of multiple hardware profiles), is that thing.  That doesn't imply that they have a big brother level of awareness of your habits... just that (like any other online distribution scheme) they link your purchase to an account.  But in the case of music, for my wife to listen to the songs that I copy (and for me to listen to hers) the machine has to be authorized.  They just don't have the same scheme in place for apps- they're able to be used on all devices that you have linked to your account.

zridling

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #57 on: October 22, 2010, 08:30:43 AM »
Apps-world may bore me, but they can get expensive very fast ($400!):

expensive app

notzippy

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #58 on: November 02, 2010, 01:12:06 PM »
Don't forget about googles step into this ..

https://chrome.google.com/webstore

If you watch the video I would tend to agree a bit with the "issues" trying to find good software.. But I am not all that interested in being borged into google..

NZ

howardb

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Re:Apps-based world boring - How about unix/linus apps?
« Reply #59 on: November 02, 2010, 04:41:18 PM »
Is this not an argument for the whole world of unix and linux? It seems to still be a world that is thriving with enthusiasts writing programs and scripts, mostly for free, that are not motivated primarily by the desire to make money. The distinction between users and developers remains blurry, and shell scripting is so powerful, one can amuse oneself endlessly writing customized scripts for one's own use. The proliferation of apps and portable devices is primarily aimed at practical needs that can be sold to end-users. The whole locked-into-devices-vendors-OS's-websites trend was already pioneered by Microsoft with IE, the infamous registry, its net-framework, etc. The strategy then was: make windows-related things so dependent on windows, that you have to keep buying  Microsoft products to use the things you like, or to develop things that run on windows.

I still hesitate with unix/linux apps -- because I so hate hunting for where various libraries, macros, and directories are in THIS installation -- in order to succeed in a make and compile of some application.

superboyac

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #60 on: November 02, 2010, 05:51:39 PM »
Is this not an argument for the whole world of unix and linux? It seems to still be a world that is thriving with enthusiasts writing programs and scripts, mostly for free, that are not motivated primarily by the desire to make money. The distinction between users and developers remains blurry, and shell scripting is so powerful, one can amuse oneself endlessly writing customized scripts for one's own use. The proliferation of apps and portable devices is primarily aimed at practical needs that can be sold to end-users. The whole locked-into-devices-vendors-OS's-websites trend was already pioneered by Microsoft with IE, the infamous registry, its net-framework, etc. The strategy then was: make windows-related things so dependent on windows, that you have to keep buying  Microsoft products to use the things you like, or to develop things that run on windows.

I still hesitate with unix/linux apps -- because I so hate hunting for where various libraries, macros, and directories are in THIS installation -- in order to succeed in a make and compile of some application.
I love this information.  I had never thought about that before.  Thanks so much.

Renegade

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #61 on: November 02, 2010, 09:53:00 PM »
Is this not an argument for the whole world of unix and linux?


Yes, but I think I see it for slightly different reasons. And no for some reasons. Unix and Linux are not the same. Unix is an extremely expensive operating system. That's why we got DOS and Mac OS and why we have Windows and OS X now. Tens of thousands of dollars for an OS was and is beyond the means of your regular Joe.

Linux, despite its problems, is a fantastic OS that is free in terms of "freedom" and money in most cases. There are commercial versions of Linux out there that are not free. This is a good thing.

Money is important and it helps guarantee vested interest. It is an excellent motivator.

"Free as in beer" must be about the worst analogy ever created. It does nothing but confuse the issue at hand. "Free as in freedom" would be a better description for what Linux / FOSS / OSS is about (loosely that is).


It seems to still be a world that is thriving with enthusiasts writing programs and scripts, mostly for free, that are not motivated primarily by the desire to make money.


I don't mean to be beligerent or aggressive but... This is what I think is fundamentally wrong with the Linux world: Too many people think "free" means "no money". That's not the important thing. The important thing is freedom. If you have freedom, you are free, but "free" gets mixed up with money there and distorted.

The GPL says nothing about money, and even encourages people to sell GPL software and to try and make money from it. The ability to do that has never been greater than it is today. Again, this is a fantastic thing.


The distinction between users and developers remains blurry, and shell scripting is so powerful, one can amuse oneself endlessly writing customized scripts for one's own use.


Hahaha~! There aren't all that many of us out here that find shell scripting fun or amusing. But yes, it certainly can be entertaining.


The proliferation of apps and portable devices is primarily aimed at practical needs that can be sold to end-users.


I always kind of looked at it as more entertainment than practical. The business world goes for practical, while the consumer side of things goes for shiny beeping glittery wow~! :D


The whole locked-into-devices-vendors-OS's-websites trend was already pioneered by Microsoft with IE, the infamous registry, its net-framework, etc.


IE, yes.
The registry, maybe. (It was always a crappy idea anyways, and I never really understood why anyone would use it.)
.NET, no.

.NET is the MS implementation of the CLI, an open standard developed by Microsoft and ratified by ECMA and ISO. There are 2 major implementations (.NET and Mono), although there are more (Portable.Net).

But yes, MS is the big-daddy ancestor of lock-in. However, lock-in has evolved now, and what is currently happening makes the old MS stuff look like rainbows, unicorns, and pink ponies.

Microsoft tried to lock people into software applications and operating systems.

The Apple way of the past was to lock people into the cult of Apple, which boiled down to the MS lock-in plus locking people into hardware as well. Apple has several failed attempts at their current lock-in strategy: services.

There really are only a few ways to lock people in:

1) Software applications (IE, Outlook, MS Office)
2) Operating systems (Windows vs. OS X vs. Linux)
3) Hardware (Apple computers, iPhones, the old Sun computers, etc.)
4) Platforms (Operating systems, development platforms (Xcode, Visual Studio, Borland Studio, Eclipse, etc.), application platforms (IE, Real Player, Quicktime, Windows Media Player, etc.), server platforms/stacks (LAMP, WAMP, WIMP, etc.)
5) SERVICES -- This is where the money is.

Services boils down to not "what you're doing", but HOW you're doing it.

Apple failed with some of it's early attempts like .mac, but has finally got this just about mastered.




I am most concerned about seeing things locked down like the iPhone is. Apple is trying to bring that to the desktop, which is an entirely bad thing. It's bad for consumers. It's bad for developers. But it's sure as Hell good for Apple.

I like being able to choose hardware.

I like being able to choose operating systems.

I like being able to choose software.

I like being able to choose platforms.

I like being able to choose services.

I don't like having it all dictated to me. The mobile market is the one to watch, because the "AT&T monopoly" attitude is infectious, and it's spreading.





The strategy then was: make windows-related things so dependent on windows, that you have to keep buying  Microsoft products to use the things you like, or to develop things that run on windows.


This isn't entirely fair. Nobody ever created any good development tools except Microsoft, and of course they developed them for their platform. Nobody ever stopped anyone from creating good cross-platform tools; it's just that nobody ever did until the CLI >> .NET and Mono. ANSI C isn't an answer. It's only a problem. ANSI C is simply far too difficult to get anything done in; it's not productive. MFC was a fantastic productivity tool for developers. Why didn't anyone else create anything to rival it?

The same could be said of any company. Microsoft isn't any different. Apple has ALWAYS been more close, more secretive, more proprietary, and more about lock-in and dependency than Microsoft. Always.

However, Microsoft has focused on 1 thing that distinguishes it from most vendors; it has always encouraged partners and has always encouraged people to make money with its plaforms in much stronger ways than other vendors. This has been a key factor for Microsoft's success since its early days.

Other vendors have certainly done the same, but not to the degree that MS has.

Jeez... I sound like a bloody apologist... It's just that it's true.

But yeah, MS likes lock-in, though that is much less than it used to be. If you look at Microsoft today, and not MS 10 years ago, you'd see this.

Here are some examples:

http://php.iis.net/

http://www.microsoft.../gallery/joomla.aspx

http://www.microsoft...lery/DotNetNuke.aspx

http://www.microsoft...llery/WordPress.aspx

http://www.microsoft...lery/mojoPortal.aspx

http://www.microsoft...gallery/Default.aspx

http://www.microsoft...ured/Stonehenge.aspx

http://www.opensourc.../licenses/ms-pl.html

http://www.ecma-inte...andards/Ecma-335.htm

http://www.iso.org/i...l.htm?csnumber=42927

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Office_Open_XML

http://www.ecma-inte...andards/Ecma-376.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WAV

http://weblogs.asp.n...ework-libraries.aspx

http://weblogs.asp.n...e-now-available.aspx

http://www.microsoft...dsource/default.mspx

http://en.wikipedia....ft_Reference_License

http://en.wikipedia....zation_and_licensing

http://www.microsoft...nsource/default.aspx


Now, just for a simple example, take MS not supporting OGG codecs in HTML5. Who can blame them?

Quick reference: http://gigaom.com/vi...ml5-never-say-never/

There is no proper patent vetting for OGG, and for MS to support it would potentially leave MS open to a slew of lawsuits, and we all know that courts love to flog MS whenever they have the chance.

This entire mess of lawyers and nonsense has forced companies to do bad things because they have no choice. Take the Mike Rowe case:

http://en.wikipedia....oft_vs._MikeRoweSoft

MS had to go after him to protect their trademark.

Quote
Microsoft later admitted that they may have been too aggressive in their defense of the "Microsoft" trademark.[15][20] Following the case it was suggested by Struan Robertson – editor of Out-Law.com – that Microsoft had little choice but to pursue the issue once it had come to light or they would have risked weakening their trademark.[20] This view was also espoused by ZDNet, who noted that had Microsoft knowingly ignored Rowe's site, the company would have risked losing the right to fight future trademark infringements.[21] Had legal proceedings ensued, Robertson thought that Rowe would have made a strong argument for keeping his domain, as he was using his real name and wasn't claiming to be affiliated with Microsoft.[20]

So while it's easy to villify companies, like MS, for nastiness, we often have to look at the game they are playing and the entire playing field: it's a dirty, muddy game.

The courts have done almost as much to create injustice as they have done to administer justice. Catch-22 anyone?


I still hesitate with unix/linux apps -- because I so hate hunting for where various libraries, macros, and directories are in THIS installation -- in order to succeed in a make and compile of some application.


This is a genuine problem. The Ubuntu Software Center is a great ways to get help there.

If we had better cross-platform development tools, a lot of these problems would start to go away.

Again, this is one of the reasons why I'm rooting so hard for Novell and the Mono Project. It's what I see as the true future of productive, cross-platform, open computing. With more an more component vendors releasing .NET and Mono compatible libraries, developers have greater flexibility to create cross-platform software, which is good for them, and good for consumers. Everything is open from the very bottom to the very top.




Slow Down Music - Where I commit thought crimes...

Freedom is the right to be wrong, not the right to do wrong. - John Diefenbaker

xtabber

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #62 on: November 03, 2010, 06:10:00 PM »
Android IS Linux and most Android apps are written in Java for the Android VM, which is based on the open source Harmony Java platform.  You can also write browser-based apps for Android using HTML, CSS and Javascript.

OS Information for my HTC Incredible phone running Android 2.2 (Froyo):

Kernel: Linux version 2.6.32.15-gb7b01d1 (htc-kernel@and18-2) (gcc version 4.4.0 (GCC)

Google does not require you to obtain apps through the Android Market, although individual vendors may. Doing so certainly makes it easier to keep apps upt-to-date, since the AM tracks revisions for each app downloaded through it and notifies the user when updates are available.


atkinsod

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Re: Am I the only one who finds the new Apps-based world boring?
« Reply #63 on: November 04, 2010, 10:19:27 AM »
Lots of good points here. I don't think it is (yet) as bad as a monopoly. Apple is just being who Apple always was.

I always loved Apple; I remember back in the day when we had Zenith Z248's desktops running DOS, and then we got in a Macintosh computer with the windowing interface; wow what a difference!

As much as I liked the Mac, though, it was pricey and you were locked into Apple hardware - no 3rd party hard drives available. Thus, I always stayed away as I simply couldn't afford it and didn't like the idea of being locked in.

The advantage of this strategy to both Apple and the consumers, however, is that it just works (mostly). Everything for an Apple product is designed to work with it, and for the most part it has always been just plug and play.

By "monopolizing", the theory is that Apple products will work with minimal hassle. Is it always successful? No, but for the most part seems to have worked well for them.

In theory, with Apple reviewing the products going into the App Store, the end user should be assured that the product has gone through some level of testing in order to be approved. Not so in the wild wild Internet. I love freeware utils, and am always trying things out, but there are TONS of products out there that should never have seen the light of day.

I did recently buy an iPad and am enjoying it, but I don't like the idea that I can ONLY buy through Apple either; I like the Android model better. With and Android device, while I could go through an official store, I could also get apps elsewhere if I dare tread. But, right now, there are no Android tablets that work as nicely as the iPad...

I suppose the real fear for those of us who love experimenting would be that all the manufacturers jump on the exclusive App Store model. Microsoft limits all purchases for Windows to the WinApp Store, Google Android to their store, and so forth. I don't think we have to worry about that yet, though...