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Last post Author Topic: If you think OpenOffice is a competitor to MS Office 2010, think again  (Read 8901 times)

steeladept

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The best approach for that would be to sell a turnkey hardware/software combo

I really don't think so. Dedicated hardware for servers is on the way out, except for very specialized applications like super DB servers. These days, everything is about virtualization.
Ah, but that is the beauty of the idea. You sell the turnkey combo as a computer/server specialized with Hyper-V already setup (this is Microsoft we are talking about after all) and this virtual appliance already installed.  If you already have the server and virtualization in your organization, you just buy the virtual appliance.  Kill two birds with one stone and make money both ways.  I'm with you 40k.  When do we start   :P :Thmbsup:
« Last Edit: June 18, 2010, 12:50:59 PM by steeladept »

40hz

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^Bingo! steeladept gets it!  :Thmbsup:

------------------

@CUW... - when I said "best approach" earlier, I meant as in service business model for Microsoft. Sorry if that wasn't clear.

FWIW I also think it makes perfectly good sense for the customer - even though members of the IT department (and independent contractors like me!) wouldn't like to think so.

But you know how it is...we always want to be the ones who own the network.  ;D

 ;)

« Last Edit: June 18, 2010, 05:32:30 PM by 40hz »

zridling

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@40hz:
Doesn't IBM already do this with their cloud services? They've also got a specific version designed for campuses. Bob Sutor talks about this a lot.
___________________
@Paul:
Never made the jump to Zoho full time. I do more on Google Docs (and text editor) for convenience more than anything. If I'm not buying printer ink, then I can afford a better brand of hot dog! For spreadsheets, I use OpenOffice Calc.

40hz

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@40hz[/b]:
Doesn't IBM already do this with their cloud services? They've also got a specific version designed for campuses. Bob Sutor talks about this a lot.

Sorta. But they're talking a WebSphere/Notes/Symphony solution that most places aren't that interested in pursuing. Especially after they experiment with Notes and Symphony. The simple fact it's different than what most office workers are used to is enough to sink it. It also doesn't offer much in the way of cost advantage.  And you'd still need Windows to run 95% of it anyway.

The thing that would make this a killer for Microsoft is that they own the Windows Server/Exchange/Office solution most places are looking for. All they need to do is load it on a turnkey box, which they could contract from anywhere. I'd bet HP would jump at the opportunity to do it.

Think about it this way:

Company A wants to upgrade their physical IT plant. They have their IT people do a study. Or they hire some consultants to do it for them. They identify a configuration, shop for then buy the software and hardware, get everything setup, installed, and tested.  Deploy to the pilot group. Test and fix as needed. Deploy to mission critical functions and users. Repeat test and fix as needed. Roll out to the rest of the company. Monitor. Update. Maintain. (yadda-yadda..we all know the drill.)

Company B buys the "Office in a Box" package from Microsoft. Based on its knowledge of thousands of other customer's, Microsoft provides an easily modded base configuration custom tailored to the best practices of Company B's industry segment.

The box arrives on Friday and gets installed overnight. There's no hardware or software to configure since it arrives ready to roll. All that needs to be done is create the profiles and user IDs, the file directories and permissions, and migrate data. The system gets plugged in, powered up, checked for problems and allowed to 'cook' for a bit before the IT department starts setting up accounts and moving files. Come Monday, the new system gets run in parallel for a few weeks just to be sure. Then it gets rolled out to the rest of the company.

Microsoft remotely handles all the software and security updates. The hardware manufacturer handles all mechanical issues via preventative maintenance schedules, and/or as requested by Microsoft on behalf of the customer.

Internal IT staffing needs are now reduced to the small crew needed to handle routine system backups and file/user maintenance. Middle-management IT becomes redundant since Microsoft is now providing that level of business function.

In this brave new world, all that remains are the IT 'grunts' plus the CIO and his entourage.

This arrangement works out well for the CIO, who has now been freed up to focus on the bigger information issues and strategies his company needs to stay on top of. No more staffing budgets, personnel issues, etc. Just pure IT upper level management functions - and keeping the rest of the company happy.

Heck, he's even got Microsoft as his 'fall guy' should things ever bork up big time.

I dunno. It sounds like a natural progression to me. Once you start moving back to the centralized model mainframes used, offering a product/service mix like the old giants used offer also starts making sense. And that's true whether the "mainframe" is one big box or a network of 3000 smaller machines in cloud formation. Distributed, virtual, or cloud computing leverages advances in network technology, software, and hardware. But it doesn't change the underlying idea behind having one central mainframe. It's just a more efficient and resilient way of accomplishing it.

Just my tuppence anyway... 8)
« Last Edit: June 20, 2010, 01:31:07 PM by 40hz »

urlwolf

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back to the original topic ... :)
I think OO.org helps selling MS office. People install it, see how it horribly messes up their docs, or find two bugs in presenter in less than an hour, and then run screaming back into MS's lap. They lay there in fetal position trying to forget what they saw.

steeladept

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Nice visual.... ;D ;D ;D

40hz

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Too bad they couldn't forget about PowerPoint and  every other piece of presentation software while they were in a coma.

 :P

(Can you guess I'm not a fan of slide presentations?)
« Last Edit: June 21, 2010, 02:14:45 PM by 40hz »

Darwin

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Too bad they couldn't forget about PowerPoint and  every other piece of presentation software while they were in a coma.

 :P

(Can you guess I'm not a fan of slide presentations?)

I'm forced to use 'em when I lecture (long, convoluted story) and I hate Hate HATE them. Powerpoint itself is not bad, it's slide presentations in general that get me in a lather). Why? Because they so often BECOME the lecture instead of something to support the lecture.
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

40hz

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Try telling your audience that  you don't do PowerPoint because slides have been linked to a certain male 'medical problem' that Viagra can't fix, - and all the penicillin and black coffee in the world won't cure...

That's what I do.

Sometimes they buy it.

(Worth a try either way.)
« Last Edit: June 21, 2010, 06:39:10 PM by 40hz »

Gwen7

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back to the original topic ... :) :Thmbsup:

which is what? getting together to slag OO. or sing the praises of MS office?  ;-)

i thought the OT comments about possible directions Microsoft could take office were much more relevant.  

 :)

urlwolf

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back to the original topic ... :) :Thmbsup:


which is what? getting together to slag OO. or sing the praises of MS office?  ;-)

i thought the OT comments about possible directions Microsoft could take office were much more relevant. 

 :)


Oh, I'd actually love to see OO take over the world. I'm a linux user. In fact, there are some nice directions, such as OO plugins. An open ecosystem could do wonders for an office application.

But I still find that I cannot recommend OO to anyone. I have hope on koffice though.

Darwin

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The OO team needs to de-couple all of the component applications in my oh so humble opinion. Just as with the switch from v.1 to v.2 (if memory serves) the development team dropped the navigator sort of thingy that opened and from which you then clicked on an application's icon to open it, so too do they now need to allow any componenet to load on demand without the necessity of the entire suite loading in the background. This is what slows it down. Of course, it's convenient to be able to open any OO supported file from any application, but it has this cost. Note, too, that I'm just an ideas guy - I can't code my way out of a paper bag and the de-coupling of which I speak my be a tall, tall order?
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

Curt

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Your idea is good, Darwin. At least you 'have a way with words' :-)

Such "de-coupling" must be implemented the right way. As an example of the wrong way, PhotoScape will launch the entire program and THEN offer you to open one of all the minor parts of it. This is a slow 'have not way'...

However, many of my friends are still using OO, and when I point out the weaknesses, they shake their shoulders and talk about MS Office and OO being the only accepted alternatives in the world; they may know about some other alternatives, but their bosses won't let them install any other office program than OO or Microsoft.


40hz

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Oh, I'd actually love to see OO take over the world.

Not me.  :) If there's no competition things won't improve. And the price tag will go through the ceiling too. (Look at Photoshop.)

I want to see at least two absolutely killer office suites locked in mortal combat at all times.

 :Thmbsup:

steeladept

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Oh, I'd actually love to see OO take over the world.

Not me.  :) If there's no competition things won't improve. And the price tag will go through the ceiling too. (Look at Photoshop.)

I want to see at least two absolutely killer office suites locked in mortal combat at all times.

 :Thmbsup:
+1, well actually +4.  I am not a fan of oligarchies either.