Welcome Guest.   Make a donation to an author on the site August 01, 2014, 08:57:25 AM  *

Please login or register.
Or did you miss your validation email?


Login with username and password (forgot your password?)
Why not become a lifetime supporting member of the site with a one-time donation of any amount? Your donation entitles you to a ton of additional benefits, including access to exclusive discounts and downloads, the ability to enter monthly free software drawings, and a single non-expiring license key for all of our programs.


You must sign up here before you can post and access some areas of the site. Registration is totally free and confidential.
 
The N.A.N.Y. Challenge 2011! Download 30+ custom programs!
   
   Forum Home   Thread Marks Chat! Downloads Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Down
  Reply  |  New Topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: Browser Wars: Why did you choose yours?  (Read 10433 times)
Stephen66515
Animated Giffer in Chief
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 2,353



see users location on a map View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« on: February 05, 2010, 02:52:22 PM »

Seeing as there is a lot of chat as of recent, in regards to which is the best browser, I would love to know which features of each browser you like the best, and why, and also how you use those features to your full advantage.

This would certainly make for an interesting debate and hopefully give some insightful comments in regards to each browser.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2010, 03:51:32 PM by Stephen66515 » Logged

No trees were harmed during the creation of this message.  Millions of electrons, however, were terribly inconvenienced

"Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the things you can think up if only you try!" - Dr. Seuss
Josh
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 3,320



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2010, 03:14:53 PM »

To me a browser must have a few capabilities.

A: It must be able to be extended. I am not talking about loading up thousands of extensions, but a few that have proven useful or provide me my desired way of operating. Chrome is there now and I am just waiting on the roboform extension to give me back my full RF Toolbar. Extensions are a must if you want a truly personal browsing experience. Some browsers allow endless customization of the UI, but that is not enough for me. I must be able to extend a browser if the developer has not added something I find useful.

B: It must be fast. No, I am not talking about in benchmark times when rendering Java, AJAX, various CSS scripts and activex controls all at once. I am talking overall speed. UI Responsiveness, switching between tabs, and load time. I do not care to switch browsers because one is .3ms faster at AJAX rendering. I want overall experience. That is something which cannot be measured in a benchmark that matters to me.

C: The browser must be easy to install and uninstall. IE does not register when it comes to this category as it is part of windows and thus requires neither. That is not a plus or a minus to me as IE stays out of the way unless I request it (or some poorly coded application launches IE despite my default browser choice).

All that said, those are the major players in my criteria for a browser. Right now, I am using firefox. 3.6 improved on speed and memory usage but memory usage is not that important to me. I do not have 4GB of ram to let it sit there doing nothing. I have it so applications can use it. Chrome uses a bit more ram and more processes but in the end it results in a smoother experience from my perspective. One tab crashing does not crash the entire browser, just that tabs process. Chrome is missing one thing and I will gladly swap over and that is the roboform extension. I am thinking about even going with the bookmarklet, but that is just far too different for me to operate with so I am playing around with it now. So, in the end, chrome is my preferred browser but I am using FF until I can get chrome to do what I want it to do.

Might want to change CHOSE to CHOOSE ;-)
Logged

Strength in Knowledge
Stephen66515
Animated Giffer in Chief
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 2,353



see users location on a map View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2010, 03:51:59 PM »

Quote
Might want to change CHOSE to CHOOSE ;-)

LoL, never noticed that, cheers tongue
Logged

No trees were harmed during the creation of this message.  Millions of electrons, however, were terribly inconvenienced

"Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the things you can think up if only you try!" - Dr. Seuss
Tuxman
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,438


OMG not him again!

View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2010, 09:24:55 PM »

I chose Firefox (Phoenix back then) because it was sort of the "successor" to my beloved Netscape Navigator. I played with some IE-based browsers before, but they all were rather instable and working with them was like patchwork. Opera could never convince me, and I never needed a built-in mail client, so Fx was doing fine. Now it is not that "light" anymore but extensible. Even the Chrome people are importing Firefox' add-ons now, so, obviously, it is innovative enough.
Logged

I bet when Cheetahs race and one of them cheats, the other one goes "Man, you're such a Cheetah!" and they laugh & eat a zebra or whatever.
- @VeryGrumpyCat
zridling
Friend of the Site
Charter Member
***
Posts: 3,289


Linux captive

see users location on a map View Profile WWW Read user's biography. Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2010, 09:31:27 PM »

- Used Opera for years and loved it for its broad customizability and cross-platform consistency.
- Then I switched to Firefox because of its wondrous extensibility.
- But then came Chrome and it's all that and fast.

Google created Chrome (and Gears) to provide rich client-side support for web-based apps. Virtually every Firefox extension can be ported to Chrome and you can run Greasemonkey scripts in it without an extension. I also like how (in Linux) it allows you to hide/show the title bar. The status bar floats temporarily. And it can be skinned to one's tastes. Doesn't handle large number of tabs like Opera does, but that's in large part because each tab is sandboxed. When a site freezes, only the tab need be closed, as the rest of the browser is fine.

Some extensions are invaluable, such as AutoPatchwork that allows you to scroll through multiple page articles, forums, jumps; Personalized Web that allows you to specify rules for fonts, HTML, JavaScript, and CSS to customize a website on the fly.

They're not unique, but they sure make browsing a lot easier. For now, my choice is Chrome until something better comes along. I've no allegiance to browsers like I do text editors.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2010, 10:57:52 PM by zridling » Logged

- zaine (on Google+)
Tuxman
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,438


OMG not him again!

View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2010, 09:34:40 PM »

Virtually every Firefox extension can be ported to Chrome and you can run Greasemonkey scripts in it without an extension.
So, basically, Chrome is a Firefox clone?  Cool
(I've read that there are some incompatibilities with existing GM scripts indeed.)
Logged

I bet when Cheetahs race and one of them cheats, the other one goes "Man, you're such a Cheetah!" and they laugh & eat a zebra or whatever.
- @VeryGrumpyCat
cyberdiva
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 906


see users location on a map View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2010, 11:04:06 PM »

I started years ago with Netscape, then switched to Opera because I loved some of its innovative built-in features, plus the fact that I could customize it.  I used Opera for years (even when it cost money), but eventually I switched to Firefox because it rendered more sites correctly than Opera did.  Opera kept insisting on perfect adherence to "standards," which was fine in the abstract but sucked in real life.  Firefox is still my default browser.  I now value it primarily for some of its extensions, but I'm increasingly frustrated with how sluggish it has become.  If Opera (which I find much faster) had extensions, I'd switch back to it in a heartbeat.  I've been interested in what people have said in recent threads here about Chrome.  I'm somewhat wary about putting yet more of my online life in Google's hands, but I may eventually give Chrome a try.
Logged
CleverCat
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,122


Cat's Are Fun!

see users location on a map View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2010, 01:06:39 AM »

3 reasons:

1. Extensions
2. Extensions
3. Extensions

 Thmbsup
Logged

If you need help - JUST ASK!
Josh
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 3,320



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2010, 03:53:12 AM »

Tuxman: So, you are basically saying that any browser which has extensions is a clone of firefox, is that right? If so, then mozilla and netscape were both copies of IE because IE allowed products to tie into the browser from the beginning. Other browsers based off IE have allowed similar functionality well before your beloved FF came into play. Now please note, I am not knocking FF, I like it and use it currently, but as I said before, once Roboform comes to chrome, I am jumping ship. It is not that Mozilla (Or its users in the case of extensions) are not innovative enough, its that chrome gives me what I want in a 0 n

You seem bent on the fact that everyone else is running with extensions or various extension features (NOT CREATED BY MOZILLA, but by its users). In the end the only thing that matters is not who did it first, but who does it best and in my books chrome is doing quite a good job so far of catching up and has quite a bit of potential and kinetic momentum to let it surpass what firefox started with its FRAMEWORK. That is the primary difference is that FF made it possible for EVERYONE to tie into the browser through a common framework/API. Microsoft allowed this from the start through its Windows API.

As I said, in the end, its not a matter of who copied who or who did what first. It is a matter of who A. Does it best, B. Does it in a way that works for the end user or C. Does it in a way that is most intuitive to the general populous. So please, all I am asking is that we stop the "X is just a copy of Y" or that "X did Y feature first". It really gets old especially with the opera crowd and tabbed browsing.
Logged

Strength in Knowledge
nudone
Cody's Creator
Columnist
***
Posts: 4,116



see users location on a map View Profile WWW Read user's biography. Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2010, 04:32:04 AM »

Maxthon, because it seems better equiped than everything else - but i confess, i've probably not made enough effort to find the plugins for the other browsers to make them work the same... but why bother when Maxthon comes with most "plugin" features built in.

(plus Maxthon starts up pretty quick.)
Logged
Stephen66515
Animated Giffer in Chief
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 2,353



see users location on a map View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2010, 06:49:20 AM »

Just come across a bit of info on how Extensions  work and are created in Opera, seems rather long winded and didn't really have a chance to look at it all, but the documentation is here for you anyway.

Its all about the cross-browser NPAPI extensions and use the MozillaPlugins registry key.
Logged

No trees were harmed during the creation of this message.  Millions of electrons, however, were terribly inconvenienced

"Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the things you can think up if only you try!" - Dr. Seuss
Josh
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 3,320



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2010, 07:32:02 AM »

That is for PLUGINS not extensions. That was pointed out a while ago. This is for stuff like flash/java.
Logged

Strength in Knowledge
Stephen66515
Animated Giffer in Chief
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 2,353



see users location on a map View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2010, 07:35:22 AM »

Ah, my bad, like I said, I didn't read it all and it WAS labeled as Extensions lol
Logged

No trees were harmed during the creation of this message.  Millions of electrons, however, were terribly inconvenienced

"Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the things you can think up if only you try!" - Dr. Seuss
tinjaw
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,926



I'm so glad breakbeat techno isn't an illegal drug

see users location on a map View Profile WWW Read user's biography. Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2010, 09:03:38 AM »

I chose Firefox for two reasons. 20% because it is not Microsoft and 80% because of extensions/addons/plugins.
Logged

 
Tuxman
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,438


OMG not him again!

View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2010, 09:58:14 AM »

Tuxman: So, you are basically saying that any browser which has extensions is a clone of firefox, is that right?
No,  but stepwise adopting special Firefox stuff like Adblock Plus and Greasemonkey is not innovative at all.

It really gets old especially with the opera crowd and tabbed browsing.
... which they did not have first.
Logged

I bet when Cheetahs race and one of them cheats, the other one goes "Man, you're such a Cheetah!" and they laugh & eat a zebra or whatever.
- @VeryGrumpyCat
Josh
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 3,320



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2010, 10:01:07 AM »

It is innovative if they improve upon it. That is the difference. Innovation does not involve creating a brand new product but can be rather improving an existing one.
Logged

Strength in Knowledge
Tuxman
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,438


OMG not him again!

View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #16 on: February 06, 2010, 10:03:32 AM »

Where is the improvement?
Logged

I bet when Cheetahs race and one of them cheats, the other one goes "Man, you're such a Cheetah!" and they laugh & eat a zebra or whatever.
- @VeryGrumpyCat
Josh
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 3,320



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2010, 10:25:47 AM »

So, if I am understanding, your sole objection to other browsers using features is that they must improve something? I think the fact that google and others are implimenting what users want, extension capabilities, opens the doors for those developing users to innovate beyond what is already on the market. That said, you have to start somewhere. Chrome and its extension capability is in its infancy while firefox is like the 30 year old businessman who already has his ways set.

Give it time and I guarantee that the chrome system will surpass what is seen on firefox because only when people compete with similar ideas does innovation truly occur.
Logged

Strength in Knowledge
Tuxman
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,438


OMG not him again!

View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2010, 10:29:24 AM »

My objection to other browsers is that they try to be a Firefox copy. Once they changed that, they might come back and tell me.
Logged

I bet when Cheetahs race and one of them cheats, the other one goes "Man, you're such a Cheetah!" and they laugh & eat a zebra or whatever.
- @VeryGrumpyCat
Josh
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 3,320



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2010, 11:00:53 AM »

And what exactly is wrong with that? They are not copying verbatim in most instances and in others it is the exact same author porting the extension. So really, what is the difference? If a developer chooses to release the SAME tool for another browser, then why change it specifically for one of the browsers you are coding for? Or is it that you are upset that these coders are in fact supporting "the competition"?

I care less which browser I use as long as it does the job I want. I am not "attached" to one browser or way of working. Anyways, back to the rest of the thread as once again this has been hijacked on an off-topic rant that seems to be occurring quite frequently.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2010, 11:03:46 AM by Josh » Logged

Strength in Knowledge
Tuxman
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,438


OMG not him again!

View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2010, 11:02:58 AM »

Why does anyone prefer the copy?
Logged

I bet when Cheetahs race and one of them cheats, the other one goes "Man, you're such a Cheetah!" and they laugh & eat a zebra or whatever.
- @VeryGrumpyCat
Edvard
Coding Snacks Author
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 2,497



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2010, 12:33:26 PM »

Josh already explained...
If the copy is an improvement then it is very likely to be preferred to the original.
...
I've loved Firefox since the Phoenix days as well, mostly because I was very new on the internet at the time and I very quickly caught on that using IE on the web could oftentimes be akin to wearing a target on your shirt while exploring the local rifle range.
It was fairly speedy at first, but every new generation saw more and more features added and with it decreased speed and (dare I say it?...) bloat.

Then I switched to Linux and Firefox was the only game in town, so I was more or less stuck with it.
I tried Chrome, which is fairly speedy, but it just didn't "feel" right.
When I used Chrome, I felt like I was walking in the woods at night feeling eyes on me watching from behind every tree shadow.
Especially since I hear more and more every day about how much Google wants to know about me and what I'm doing with their browser on their search engine over their Inter...
oops. ulp. I almost said that out loud...

On a hopeful note, I have tested the latest iteration code-named Minefield and I have found a noticeable speed improvement.
Running them both in side-by-side comparison, the Minefield has that kind of 'touchy-feely fast' that Josh is referring to.
In a word, it's responsive, which is a word I haven't used to describe Firefox for quite some time, even with the latest improvements in 3.6.

If you're really brave, and you have the hardware and OS for it, get the 64-bit version (experimental Windows builds here: http://wiki.mozilla-x86-64.com/Firefox:Download ).
Yes, it's supposed to be considered 'unstable' but I haven't crashed it yet...
Logged

All children left unattended will be given a mocha and a puppy.
Stoic Joker
Honorary Member
**
Posts: 5,125



View Profile WWW Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2010, 12:43:03 PM »

I spend most of my time on servers where less is more, and on client's machines where you have to deal with what's there. So I find it's simpler to just learn how to deal with what is readily available (e.g. IE). I've used IE for years, and have no problems with it.

Addons have no appeal for me, the more things that are added simply increase the number of things that can go wrong. Page displayed, job done, end of need.
Logged
Josh
Charter Honorary Member
***
Posts: 3,320



View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2010, 12:45:09 PM »

That is one topic I wanted to touch on with chrome. Where are the privacy issues coming in to play? Does google really intercept and monitor all traffic used through the browser? Surely they do through their search engine since it is a great data analysis tool, but through the browser? I have not seen any mysterious connections to google when using chrome that were not initiated by me.

Is there a page which provides documented evidence of these things? I am not trying to attack here, merely inquisitive as I have not witnessed any mysterious behavior since using chrome. I am always willing to learn.

That said, like stoic, I use IE for a majority of my server management tasks because, like it or not, ActiveX still provides a very useful system for interacting with systems on a level which is far more complex using java and other scripting languages. IE is accepted by the DoD, the parent of who I work for (US Army). Firefox is becoming more so but it still needs a lot of changes made to it for it to work with DoD systems (CAC Card Authentication, certificate issues, etc).
Logged

Strength in Knowledge
kartal
Supporting Member
**
Posts: 1,529


View Profile Give some DonationCredits to this forum member
« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2010, 12:54:19 PM »

My favorites are K-Meleon, Elinks and Lynx beside Firefox. I use Epiphany and K-meleon(under wine) on my Ubuntu. To be honest K-meleon under Wine is faster than any browser on Ubuntu except console browsers like Elinks and Lynx. K-Meleon offers nice range of default tools, very accesible. The only thing I wish to have is an .mht exporter Such thing exists. Beside all those plusses, K-Meleon never wishes to be an ambitious project like Firefox.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2010, 01:51:07 PM by kartal » Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Up
  Reply  |  New Topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  
   Forum Home   Thread Marks Chat! Downloads Search Login Register  

DonationCoder.com | About Us
DonationCoder.com Forum | Powered by SMF
[ Page time: 0.052s | Server load: 0.04 ]