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Poll

What language will have the best chance at surviving the coming paradigm-shift?

Java
3 (18.8%)
C
2 (12.5%)
PHP
1 (6.3%)
C++
2 (12.5%)
(Visual) Basic
0 (0%)
C#
2 (12.5%)
Python
1 (6.3%)
Javascript
0 (0%)
Perl
1 (6.3%)
Ruby
1 (6.3%)
Delphi
1 (6.3%)
PL/SQL
0 (0%)
Objective C
0 (0%)
SAS
0 (0%)
Lisp/Scheme
1 (6.3%)
ABAP
0 (0%)
Pascal
0 (0%)
ActionScript
0 (0%)
D
0 (0%)
Lua
0 (0%)
None of the Above
1 (6.3%)

Total Members Voted: 6

Author Topic: Programming Language Adapability  (Read 2477 times)

CodeTRUCKER

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Programming Language Adapability
« on: December 06, 2009, 01:27:12 AM »
First off... 5 Cody Coins to the first one that can guess what "NYAWTBPLP" stands for (Answer will be provided just after NANY deadline).  This works like the old Mastermind game. 

Secondly... the world is changing, especially where technology is concerned.  In the first half of the 20th century, "Radio" was king busting the monopoly previously held by "Print."  Heir to the throne for the next pentadecade was "TV."  Now into the 21 century every possible conception of media communication of the past has been dwarfed by the "Computer" (Internet).  Also, in the realms of coding on a non-mainframe the Beginner's All-Purpose Instruction Code has been left in the dust many times over.  Replaced by [fill-in-the-blank].  Lately, in the Windows camp there has been some shift from 32-bit to 64-bit, XP, Vista and now "7."  LINUX, MAC and [fill-in-another-blank] has seen similar advancements.  Even the platforms have changed from desktop to laptop to palmtop and cellphones.  Given the future media will only be an advance of the present "Computer" (Internet?) which will have to be programmed in some kind of syntax... What's next?  

The point of this poll/thread is to discover if there is a consensus about which programming language (if any) will be able to survive the coming shift in computer programming paradigm?  Do any of the existing languages have the "guts" to be extensible to the future needs of and for programmers?  

There have been numerous "what's the best programming language" threads on DC, but as I reread through them I began to wonder if the "candidates" were still valid in light of the question posed here?  No one has a crystal ball, but what code do you think will be able to survive the brave new world?

So, vote on what do you think the future will hold (and post why below) and try you hand at the DC-style "Mastermind."

[Disclaimer - The listed programming languages come from TIOBE, not me.  :) ]

[Edit - Added game info link. Clarified question.]
« Last Edit: December 07, 2009, 03:57:52 PM by CodeTRUCKER »

Shades

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Re: Programming Language Adapability
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2009, 10:02:19 AM »
Allright, I'll give it a shot:

NYAWTBPLP
Not Your Average Way To Be Programming Lovable Programs


CodeTRUCKER

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Re: Programming Language Adapability
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2009, 01:46:45 PM »
Allright, I'll give it a shot:

NYAWTBPLP
Not Your Average Way To Be Programming Lovable Programs

Hi Shades.  Ever played Mastermind?
2 - orange pegs.  0 - White Pegs

Don't forget the point of this thread.  
:feedback:

[Edit - Added peg info]
« Last Edit: December 07, 2009, 11:14:42 AM by CodeTRUCKER »

Eóin

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Re: Programming Language Adapability
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2009, 03:59:18 PM »
I'm curious which paradigm shift you're referring to? There can be lots out there claiming to be the next big thing.

CodeTRUCKER

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Re: Programming Language Adapability
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2009, 04:21:28 PM »
I'm curious which paradigm shift you're referring to? There can be lots out there claiming to be the next big thing.

I tried to communicate this idea in my original post?  The answer to your question is, "I don't know."  I am confident no one(?) knows either.  When "Print" dominated in the 1800's no one(?) conceived "Radio."  Early radio programs seeded the idea of "Television" with the likes of Flash Gordon, etc., but no one(?) really conceived what it would be like to look at the tube in their living room.  Again, when TV was first established, no one(?) could conceive of the Internet over remote computers.  Likewise, DOS programmers could not have seen what was coming in "7" anymore than we can conceive the new [fill-in-the-blank].

The purpose of this question/poll is to provoke people to think about what could/would come next and then to evaluate if our existing languages/apps would survive that shift.  This will not be an easy exercise.  It was because of the necessary brain strain involved that I created the quasi-Mindmaster "Guess what 'NYAWTBPLP' means" game in the first place. 

Thanks for your participation and good luck! :Thmbsup:

wraith808

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Re: Programming Language Adapability
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2009, 01:00:29 PM »
The problem with your question is that the previous paradigms (Print, Radio, Television) were so completely divorced from each other that pretty much nothing survived from one medium to the other in terms of technology intact.  If we're to take that approach, then the answer would be none.  Because it would be so completely out of left field as to be a different dimension of communication.

Look at print to radio.  How many operators in the field (press operators, etc.. not producers of media) transitioned using their same daily operations.  Zero?  Then from Print to Radio... Zero again, I'd hazard.  From radio to Television?  There might be some technological overlap- but not much...

CodeTRUCKER

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Re: Programming Language Adapability
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2009, 04:16:34 PM »
The problem with your question is that the previous paradigms (Print, Radio, Television) were so completely divorced from each other that pretty much nothing survived from one medium to the other in terms of technology intact.  If we're to take that approach, then the answer would be none.  Because it would be so completely out of left field as to be a different dimension of communication.

Look at print to radio.  How many operators in the field (press operators, etc.. not producers of media) transitioned using their same daily operations.  Zero?  Then from Print to Radio... Zero again, I'd hazard.  From radio to Television?  There might be some technological overlap- but not much...

Hi wraith808,

Thanks for the comment.  I have modified my original post (somewhat) to handle the weakness you presented.  I said "somewhat" because I don't see that I totally missed it... 

The Print... Radio... TV... Internet (Computer) logic carries additional information you might not have considered enough, but you did touch on it in your last thought.   "Print to Radio" was certainly a huge jump, but "Radio to TV" was less of a jump and "TV to Internet (Computer)," in my estimation was even less of a jump.  If we follow this logic then the next "Internet Computer to ???" should be even less of a leap than any of the other jumps, unless I am missing something?  So, it should be conceivable that at least some of the existing programming languages would be able to make the cut.  Remember, the whole point of the poll/post was to...

Quote
... discover if there is a consensus about which programming language (if any) will be able to survive the coming shift in computer programming paradigm?

I hope that helps frame it better and you will be able to vote.  :) 

Try the game too!  (Hint: The answer is related to the DC board and others like it.)