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What books are you reading?

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Dormouse:
Do.
Like Gulliver's Travels, it is all held together by a fast paced adventure, in this case a romp with characters that zing like a James Bond movie. Structured like The Magnificent Seven or the Dirty Dozen (and maybe even a deliberate reference to the Seven's appropriation of a Japanese original), the adventures are pure D&D (as is the totting up).

The economics described are those of Rome (late Republic/early Empire) or maybe Spanish conquest (the economics is more Roman, the social consequences more Spanish). Explicit social comment, but seems more aimed at the isms in D&D/RPG than contemporary society. I suspect that the author has already overstretched his economic expertise and that Book Two, which I haven't read yet, will have more of the social commentary than economics. If it has either, because they can be ignored as the story and characters hold up on their own.

MilesAhead:
Another fun novella by Mark Clifton:

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/27595

If you have problems with authority figures I suspect you will enjoy his stories.  Written in early sixties but really applies in the post 9/11 USA.

tomos:
Another fun novella by Mark Clifton:

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/27595

If you have problems with authority figures I suspect you will enjoy his stories.  Written in early sixties but really applies in the post 9/11 USA.
-MilesAhead (June 18, 2018, 03:37 PM)
--- End quote ---
couldn't get the book (Error 403: Forbidden) but still made for an interesting read:
https://cand.pglaf.org/germany/index.html
SpoilerThe Basics

    On December 30, 2015, PGLAF received notification that a lawsuit had been filed in Germany against it, and its CEO. The lawsuit was concerned with 18 eBooks, by three authors, which are part of the Project Gutenberg collection.
        The lawsuit was filed in the Frankfurt am Main Regional Court, in Germany.
        The Plaintiff is S. Fischer Verlag, GmbH. Hedderichstrasse 114, 60956 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. They are represented by the law firm, Waldorf Frommer of Munich.
    The essence of the lawsuit is that the Plaintiff demands the 18 eBooks to be removed from Project Gutenberg's servers. The lawsuit also seeks punitive damages and fines.
    Based on legal advice from its US attorneys, PGLAF declined to remove the items. The lawsuit proceeded, with a series of document filings by both sides, and hearings before the judges (all of which occurred in German, in the German court). PGLAF hired a German law firm, Wilde Beuger Solmecke, in Köln, to represent it in Germany.
    On February 9 2018, the Court issued a judgement granting essentially most of the Plaintiff's demands. The Court did not order that the 18 items no longer be made available by Project Gutenberg, and instead wrote that it is sufficient to instead make them no longer accessible to German Internet (IP) addresses.
        Court's original decision (in German).
        Decision translated into English.
    PGLAF complied with the Court's order on February 28, 2018 by blocking all access to www.gutenberg.org and sub-pages to all of Germany.

ironic that Project Gutenberg gets blocked in Germany...

rjbull:
ironic that Project Gutenberg gets blocked in Germany...-tomos (June 18, 2018, 03:53 PM)
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Indeed - especially the whole of it, not just the books the plaintiff wanted removed.  Sounds a bit petulant.

IainB:
...PGLAF complied with the Court's order on February 28, 2018 by blocking all access to www.gutenberg.org and sub-pages to all of Germany. ...
-tomos (June 18, 2018, 03:53 PM)
--- End quote ---
Yes, ironic, and brilliantly simple from an administrative POV.
As a logical extension - and even more simple - might be to block access to Project Gutenberg from all countries.    :o

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