Home | Blog | Software | Reviews and Features | Forum | Help | Donate | About us
topbanner_forum
  *

avatar image

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
  • December 06, 2016, 12:00:05 AM
  • Proudly celebrating 10 years online.
  • Donate now to become a lifetime supporting member of the site and get a non-expiring license key for all of our programs.
  • donate

Author Topic: RIAA Says DRM is Dead  (Read 5645 times)

wraith808

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 8,406
  • "In my dreams, I always do it right."
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« on: July 20, 2009, 11:04:40 AM »
A true sentiment?  Or a disingenuous statement?

http://lifehacker.co...iaa-says-drm-is-dead

The points made are genuine- DRM inconveniences legitimate customers, not those who wouldn't buy in the first place.  But do they really see that now?  And how long before the MPAA and whatever association is over the rights of book distribution follow suit?

40hz

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2007
  • **
  • Posts: 11,768
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2009, 04:23:31 PM »
Well...

In the wake of the Kindle debacle, now that certain media playback devices seem to be able to delete things without the "owner's" consent, I guess DRM is moot.

Why bother suing when you can just go in and zap anything you don't believe belongs there?


tinjaw

  • Supporting Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 1,927
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009, 05:32:09 AM »

app103

  • That scary taskbar girl
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2006
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,666
    • View Profile
    • App's Apps
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2009, 07:01:04 AM »
MPAA advice to educators concerning ripping DVD's in order to have short clips for classroom use.

http://www.boingboin...to-teachers-don.html

Carol Haynes

  • Waffles for England (patent pending)
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2005
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,986
    • View Profile
    • Dales Computer Services
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2009, 09:40:03 AM »
Love the MPAA advice - brilliant stupidity!

app103

  • That scary taskbar girl
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2006
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,666
    • View Profile
    • App's Apps
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2009, 12:32:55 PM »
RIAA Spokesman Denies Saying 'DRM Is Dead' -- InformationWeek

Correcting 2 inaccuracies in that article:

1. The RIAA has never sued anyone for downloading.
2. Jammie Thomas-Rasset was fined for making available/sharing/uploading those songs, not downloading.

The RIAA only goes after uploaders, not downloaders.

Carol Haynes

  • Waffles for England (patent pending)
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2005
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,986
    • View Profile
    • Dales Computer Services
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2009, 12:37:49 PM »
2. Jammie Thomas-Rasset was fined for making available/sharing/uploading those songs, not downloading.

Anyone using torrents or other P2P services is automatically uploading if they are downloading. Even if it is just for the duration of the downloading of the files.

Lashiec

  • Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • **
  • Posts: 2,374
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2009, 12:49:02 PM »
You can always mark the option to not upload anything. There, solved ;D

Carol Haynes

  • Waffles for England (patent pending)
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2005
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,986
    • View Profile
    • Dales Computer Services
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2009, 04:53:04 PM »
The way most torrents work if you do that it is likely to take 4 years to download a single track ;)

Innuendo

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • default avatar
  • Posts: 2,255
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2009, 06:41:02 PM »
Unless you use a 'leech' client.

Not that I'm advocating anyone use one of those.

f0dder

  • Charter Honorary Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 9,029
  • [Well, THAT escalated quickly!]
    • View Profile
    • f0dder's place
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2009, 06:47:51 PM »
Unless you use a 'leech' client.

Not that I'm advocating anyone use one of those.
That doesn't really change anything - if your torrent client isn't sending data, it will be downprioritized by it's peers, leech client or not.
- carpe noctem

app103

  • That scary taskbar girl
  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2006
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,666
    • View Profile
    • App's Apps
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #11 on: July 22, 2009, 05:47:28 AM »
Anyone using torrents or other P2P services is automatically uploading if they are downloading. Even if it is just for the duration of the downloading of the files.

Some P2P clients are easily disabled from uploading, without affecting download speed.  (torrents are not the only way to get files)

1. Don't forward ports.
2. No server permission in firewall.
3. Don't share the downloads folder.

And there are ways to look like you are sharing when you are not. Depending on your software, you'll have a file list showing but nobody will be able to download them.

1. Don't forward ports.
2. No server permission in firewall.
3. In some software, you can share from a data CD or USB drive, removing the disk or drive before connecting, and then don't refresh the library. It will appear as if you are sharing the files but since they aren't there any more, uploads will fail.
4. Use a queue hack.

Now why would you want to look like you are sharing files when you are not? Well, some P2P networks have chat, and some chat hosts have bots that will automatically kick or ban you if you are not "sharing". Some have a minimum file count requirement, some have a file type requirement, etc. If all you are there for is to chat, not even downloading, you can avoid a lot of the hassles and autokick bots if you just look like you are sharing. If you get caught, just cry "corporate firewall" or "ISP filtering" and they usually let you slide.

Now I don't advocate this kind of fake sharing, because it spoils P2P networks by adding undownloadable stuff to search results. I think if you have control over what folders you share and can disable sharing your downloads folder, then point it at a folder full of Creative Commons, public domain, and open source content. (yup, that's what I share, along with my own stuff, and I usually don't download. I am just there to chat with my friends and provide free tech support.)

f0dder

  • Charter Honorary Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 9,029
  • [Well, THAT escalated quickly!]
    • View Profile
    • f0dder's place
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #12 on: July 22, 2009, 10:37:18 AM »
Sure, you can do a lot of fake stuff if you use a horrible network like DirectConnect - but that's not my cup of tea since I've never seen legitimate stuff on DC++, and it's a horribly insecure technology :)

For torrents, you generally get bad speeds unless you do seed. Unless you're dealing with torrents that are seeded from seedboxes.
- carpe noctem

jgpaiva

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined in 2006
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,727
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2009, 08:31:03 AM »
1. Don't forward ports.
2. No server permission in firewall.
3. Don't share the downloads folder.
I think that would stop the client from sharing random files, and from sharing the currently downloading files with some other peers. However, it wouldn't stop if from downloading from the peers which are providing data for the currently downloading files (since you may have data they have not yet obtained).

Deozaan

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2006
  • ***
  • Points: 1
  • Posts: 7,714
    • View Profile
    • The Blog of Deozaan
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2009, 12:18:09 PM »
MPAA advice to educators concerning ripping DVD's in order to have short clips for classroom use.

http://www.boingboin...to-teachers-don.html

Ha!

Quote
The MPAA responded with a video showing how to camcord (!) movies from a flat screen monitor, arguing that educators and students should do this instead of ripping DVDs. In the words of media literacy researcher Martine Courant Rife, that's like typing up a quote from a book, taking it outside, chiseling the words in a rock, photographing the rock, scanning the photo, and running OCR on it. And for what?


Innuendo

  • Charter Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • default avatar
  • Posts: 2,255
    • View Profile
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2009, 03:05:02 PM »
That doesn't really change anything - if your torrent client isn't sending data, it will be downprioritized by it's peers, leech client or not.

No, it changes everything. Leech clients makes it appear to the tracker that you are either seeding when you are not or makes it look like you haven't received any parts of the files when you actually have. Either way, your downloads are not down-prioritized at all.

There are lots of devious tricks available to get around the ratios and quotas.

f0dder

  • Charter Honorary Member
  • Joined in 2005
  • ***
  • Posts: 9,029
  • [Well, THAT escalated quickly!]
    • View Profile
    • f0dder's place
    • Read more about this member.
    • Donate to Member
Re: RIAA Says DRM is Dead
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2009, 06:57:29 PM »
Doesn't matter what you say to the tracker, it's the peers that up/down-prioritize the speed they give you. And if you want to fool a tracker on a ratio site, you're playing with fire - unless you're being very, very subtle you will get caught on any of the interesting sites.
- carpe noctem