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Author Topic: linux network question  (Read 4384 times)

techidave

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linux network question
« on: July 16, 2009, 05:51:25 PM »
I am a newbie when it comes to Linux (any flavor) so here is what I would like to do.

Set up say 10 desktop computers with Ubuntu or some other flavor that has a windows type appeal.  I also need to setup some time of a Linux server for 5-20 computers, mostly for administration purposes like creating logins etc.  

I have a friend who is starting a "boys ranch" and I have some white box computers without any kind of windows cd keys.  I am trying really hard to be legal and not install xp and server 2003 just because I am familiar with it and I can.

Not sure how old these boys might be but they will need some alternative schooling which they already have lined up and it is web based as well.

Not sure which flavors of Linux I should use for the workstations and for a server.

I am open for suggestions.

Dave

40hz

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2009, 06:56:23 PM »
OK DC 'Penguin People' - let's help TechiDave out with this one. I'll start the ball rolling. :)

@TD:

Are you primarily interested in setting up something like a "school system" installation or are you thinking in more general terms.

If you're doing a school type project, there are some interesting quasi-configured alternatives (i.e Edubuntu + LTSP and Karoshi Linux) to take a look at. Karoshi might be exactly what you're looking for on the server side. Excellent documentation too! There is a demo available at their website if you want to check it out. Very nice system with a lot of the details already addressed. Although Karoshi was developed by educators, it's also good for use as a general purpose server.

For desktop use, I'd need a little more information as to who and what before I could make a responsible recommendation. Could you start feeding us the details as you get them? Let's turn the DoCo Linux crowd loose on this and get you and your friend up and running.

Links:

Karoshi: http://karoshi.linuxgfx.co.uk/

Edubuntu: www.edubuntu.org/

WhateverDistroSmall.gif



« Last Edit: July 16, 2009, 07:06:47 PM by 40hz »

techidave

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2009, 07:48:52 PM »
Thanks for the quick reply 40hz.  I had not heard of the Karoshi one before.  I hope it will be as easy to use as it looks.

I was looking for some kind of server software like Active Directory for MS Windows only for Linux.  Just something that would allow for central management of several workstations that are running some form of Linux.  Mostly for user management.

The workstations would need internet access and the ability to run a few educational type games, keyboarding, word processing or presentation training or whatever that might come along. A few years ago I had read about Edbuntu which came with a whole bunch of software that schools might use.  there are probably others by now.

Hopefully this is a start fo the right kind of info you were wanting 40hz.

Edvard

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2009, 10:35:13 AM »
The central server part should be easy.
Go with a Red Hat or Ubuntu LAMP server.

For the workstations, Edubuntu ought to work fine, but If you want to manage individual accounts from the server, are you thinking thin client on the workstations? If so, try here and here and a pdf here.

That ought to get you started, let's keep this ball rolling...

techidave

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2009, 02:17:04 PM »
I know what a lamp is but what is a LAMP, Edvard?

steeladept

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2009, 02:24:23 PM »
I am limited on experience here for the server, but I would have thought SUSE would be the way to go.  Why?  SUSE is now owned and distributed by Novell...You know, the people who developed one of the first wide-spread, truly successful Network Operating Systems that worked with Windows?  Anyway, Novell had/has a structure not unlike active directory (not a surprise since Microsoft licensed the technology from Novell then beat them nearly to death with it).  Unfortunately, I don't recall what it was called - Directory Services maybe?  Anyhow, I would guess they would not have dumped it in SUSE seeing as it is so popular.  The only down side is it may require the SUSE enterprise a.k.a. not free version of SUSE.

Edvard

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2009, 02:35:01 PM »
http://en.wikipedia....28software_bundle%29
Quote
The acronym LAMP refers to a solution stack of software, usually free and open source software, used to run dynamic Web sites or servers. The original expansion is as follows:

    * Linux, referring to the operating system;
    * Apache, the Web server;
    * MySQL, the database management system (or database server);
    * one of several scripting languages: Perl, PHP or Python.[1]

It is the basic infrastructure for most Linux-based web content servers.
Whether you use the server for web stuff or not, it's a convenient package to get you everything a server would need.

40hz

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2009, 07:04:42 PM »
LAMP in and of itself won't give you everything you're looking to do. Think of it more as framework on which to build.

If you're new to the role of server administrator under Linux you'll definitely want to tale a look at eBox.

Link: http://trac.ebox-platform.com/

Quote
eBox Platform

Ebox-logo.png

eBox Platform is a unified network server that offers easy and efficient computer network administration for SMBs. It can act as a Gateway, an Infrastructure Manager, a Unified Threat Manager, an Office Server, a Unified Communication Server or a combination of them. These functionalities are tightly integrated, automating most tasks, avoiding mistakes and saving time for system administrators.

eBox Platform is released under the GNU General Public License (GPL) and runs on top of Ubuntu GNU/Linux.

eBox Technologies S.L. is the company behind eBox Platform and all the technologies and services related to them, providing a comprehensive set of deployment, support and managed services for the Global eBox Partner Network.

Like Karoshi, eBox can greatly simplify getting your server up and running since all the module integration has been done for you. Download and install it and you're ready to start configuring.

You could accomplish the same thing by starting with a LAMP server configuration and then adding additional software. But if you go this route you'll have to handle integrating everything yourself. It's not a super difficult task, but you'll need to be fairly knowledgeable about Linux (and comfortable editing config settings) to make it all work correctly. Best save that for a future project if you need to get something up and running fairly quickly.

eBox has very comprehensive "office server " features. Details at this link: http://www.ebox-tech...com/products/office/


 :Thmbsup:

(Note: The eBox ISO is free for the download. Paid training and support packages are also available.)





« Last Edit: July 17, 2009, 07:23:38 PM by 40hz »

techidave

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2009, 08:12:36 PM »
Holy cow!  I had no idea there were going to be so many options.  It looks like I should get two computers and put a server on one and a workstation on the other.

this may not be quite as easy as I thought it might be. 

After visiting with my friend last nite, he is only going to start out with 5 or 6 boys at first.  that wouldn't be a huge thing to handle but I need to look toward the future also.

Shades

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2009, 10:03:07 PM »
Always had a thing for XAMPP. This is a German site by default, but an English version is there as well.

Windows and Linux version available. In 35 to 45 Mbyte you will get an Apache webserver, MySQL database server, Mail server, PHP, Perl, OpenSSL, PHPMyAdmin etc. All ready to run after unpacking and executing 1 small batch script.

Having said that the default configuration is very open, making it ideal for developing but not to put in a (semi-) public place. There is a link in the opening page that takes care of that so you should not have to lose too much sleep over it. 

40hz

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2009, 09:54:12 AM »
Holy cow!  I had no idea there were going to be so many options. 

Noticed that didja?  :)

Welcome to the world of Linux and FOSS. :Thmbsup:


FOSS is the only 'free buffet' in the world where you could starve to death while trying to decide what to eat first.


 ;D


techidave

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2009, 06:51:47 PM »
if there are so many options, then surely there must be an idiot proof version! ;D

Well Shades, I looked at your XAMP but I would it say its not for a beginner.  I have noticed that Ubuntu has a server version.  I wonder how well that would work with Edbuntu??

40hz

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2009, 11:01:39 AM »
I have noticed that Ubuntu has a server version.  I wonder how well that would work with Edbuntu??

If you take all the desktop features and applications out of any version of Ubuntu (i.e. Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Edubuntu, "Christian Edition", etc.), you have a copy Ubuntu Server.

Basically, the server edition is just a baseline installation minus all the GUI and productivity enhancements of all the regular versions.

FWIW, it's harder for a beginner to work with UbuServ since it doesn't have a GUI to fall back on. Which is also exactly why the power users and wonks prefer it.

If you're going to play with Ubuntu server, you'll probably want to do an apt-get and install Webmin too. Webmin is a handy thing to have until you get some familiarity with the command line and 'discover' where the various config files are located.


Edvard

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2009, 10:39:32 AM »
+1 for Webmin.

Yes, set up a couple boxes for yourself and start playing.
Set up a few user accounts on  the main box and get the workstation to boot over the LAN, or at least login to an X (graphical) session from the workstation.

Once you get a grasp on that, the rest should come easier.

40hz

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2009, 06:35:15 PM »
@techidave

So...at the risk of being accused of bumping a thread: how are you making out with your project?


techidave

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Re: linux network question
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2009, 09:26:02 PM »
Well 40hz, I was thinking about this today and probably somewhat procrastinating about just doing it.  But I am working real hard trying to get my school computers finished up before Aug 1st.  Not sure I will make it but that is my goal.

But I do need to at least attempt it and see how hard/easy it is.  Since I don't already know Linux I am somewhat hesitant about even trying it.  But I did have to ask to see what my options are.