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Last post Author Topic: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery  (Read 12808 times)

Shades

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #25 on: May 03, 2009, 01:52:07 PM »
By the way, does your new PC have one or two network adapters (for example: wifi and cable)?

MerleOne

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #26 on: May 03, 2009, 02:53:44 PM »
Thanks for the directions.  I found something quite interesting this afternoon, which changes the way I am looking at this problem.  Now I am almost convinced I did something to this computer configuration that led to that problem.

But before that, I found quite a nice workaround that I'd like to mention here : I downloaded 'netscanner' here : http://www.softperfe...ucts/networkscanner/.
I select 192.168.1.0 and -.255 as start and end address, I launch this (on the Samsung NC10) and I get within a few instants all connected machines and also every available windows shared folders, including those who are hidden with a $ at the end.  I can then very easily mount the required resources.

Getting back to what I mentioned above : since I got this machine, I installed FD-ISR (I got the updated version thanks to leapfrog software, having bought the full version some years ago from HorizonDataSys).  I have kept a config almost identical to the machine as I unboxed it, and I have my current system, plus some other intermediate configs.

I happened to boot this old config, and the 'net view' command started to work immediately.  I started again with the main config, and guess what, net view returns the error message. Back to the old config : it works.

Now I "just" have to compare configs to spot the difference, but this will take quite some time.  I think I have activated (don't remember how) UPnP management,  my TCP/IP config also mentions some SUE NDIS protocol (Samsung's) , but there are many other diff. : the antivirus, many things.  I have to check...

The worst case scenario would be to reinstall everything from this config, which can be done, but I may encounter again the problem, and I'd like to identify how I did it, so I can avoid the same mistake again.
.merle1.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2009, 02:59:58 PM by MerleOne »

MerleOne

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #27 on: May 03, 2009, 03:00:54 PM »
By the way, does your new PC have one or two network adapters (for example: wifi and cable)?
Yes.  I use Wifi and have desactivated the ethernet connection.
.merle1.

Shades

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2009, 06:01:25 PM »
Somewhat good news then  ;)

UPnP can be disabled in the service management screen from Windows. Don't worry about disabling this service, it is not really required.

Sorry, I had to use Google to find out about the FD-ISR software. Myself I use regedit to export my complete registry as txt file before I install any piece of software. After installing I create a new backup and use a Difff program like WinMerge (open source) or Beyond Compare 3 (worth every penny you have to pay for it) to check for differences.

Works relatively fast and does not have to cost you any money.

How did you disable the network card, if I may so boldly ask? With more than one network card you have a multi-homed PC and it is possible that your PC requests for an updated list through the normal network card (depending on the way the card is disabled of course).

MerleOne

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #29 on: May 04, 2009, 01:54:46 AM »
Somewhat good news then  ;)

UPnP can be disabled in the service management screen from Windows. Don't worry about disabling this service, it is not really required.

Sorry, I had to use Google to find out about the FD-ISR software. Myself I use regedit to export my complete registry as txt file before I install any piece of software. After installing I create a new backup and use a Difff program like WinMerge (open source) or Beyond Compare 3 (worth every penny you have to pay for it) to check for differences.

Works relatively fast and does not have to cost you any money.

How did you disable the network card, if I may so boldly ask? With more than one network card you have a multi-homed PC and it is possible that your PC requests for an updated list through the normal network card (depending on the way the card is disabled of course).

Actually, I use System Explorer 1.5 (http://systemexplorer.mistergroup.org/) to compare configuration (file and / or registry) before/after an installation, whenever I do it, using its "snapshot" mechanism.  I have done a snapshot while in one config, another while in the other one, but there are too many differences to allow me to quickly where it may come from.
However it tells me the problam should be solved by just changing the Samsung config.

How I disabled the ethernet connection : I just opened connections from the start menu, right-clicked on the ethernet one and chose 'disable', so that I don't get the non connected icon i systray.  BTW, I now understand what people call "multi-homed".

Regarding FD-ISR, it's incredibly powerful but I find it somewhat difficult to understand all its mechanisms.  Since I had lots of free HDD, it was a good opportunity to try it : I had a non used license, changing config is just a matter of reboot, it doesn't slow down the machine in any way and is rock solid.
.merle1.

Shades

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #30 on: May 04, 2009, 07:10:28 PM »
My hunch was correct then. You should disable the network card in the device manager (rightclick on the 'My computer' icon and choose the 'Manage' option in the appearing menu). Your way makes sure that no connection is made, but Windows still sees two network cards. Disabling in the device manager should prevent this.

Then again, if there are no objections in using the "no Samsung"-config, I would use that one and be done with it.

MerleOne

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #31 on: May 05, 2009, 04:14:07 AM »
Thanks, will try that and let you know.  I got this morning again strange results.  I shut down the PC that is the Master Browser, started the Samsung in the config that usually doesn't work, started the main PC, and net view worked....  But it was only for a few minutes and I had to leave for work...  I'll check again later on.
.merle1.

pbroll

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #32 on: May 06, 2009, 02:31:24 AM »
If your network-adapter is on your motherboard, then you can disable it in the BIOS.

MerleOne

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #33 on: May 06, 2009, 04:28:35 AM »
If your network-adapter is on your motherboard, then you can disable it in the BIOS.
Thanks. I think I saw something like that in the BIOS settings, but disabling it at windows levels makes it easier to renable it when needed without a reboot.
Anyway, since I have a config that works with both wifi and ethernet enabled, I'll only use this as a last resort (well... just before throwing my Samsung out of the window...).
.merle1.

MerleOne

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery (solved ? Maybe...)
« Reply #34 on: May 06, 2009, 04:15:08 PM »
Hi,

I may have found something : when I take my old working config, remove McAfee, leave the machine without A/V, reboot, test the 'net view' command : it works.

I then install Avira Free V9 : after reboot, net view is broken again.  I remove Avira, reboot, Net view works again.

My working config was using Sunbelt Vipre : same as with Avira.

I am now trying with Rising AV, despite the bad reputation of the company (I won a free license thanks to Raymond.cc) and it seems to work.  I guess I am going to ditch Vipre if I can confirm this, but before that, I'll contact Avira & Sunbelt.

To be continued...
.merle1.

Carol Haynes

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #35 on: May 06, 2009, 04:22:47 PM »
Try www.avast.com - the do a free home version and it is excellent and low impact on your system.

MerleOne

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #36 on: May 07, 2009, 04:20:58 AM »
Try www.avast.com - the do a free home version and it is excellent and low impact on your system.

It used to generate a lot of extra disk activity (1-2 years ago). There is a new version ?
.merle1.

Carol Haynes

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #37 on: May 07, 2009, 08:24:03 AM »
I am using it and haven't noticed a lot of disk activity - in fact it seems remarkably quiet and has almost no impact on day to day computer use.

MerleOne

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Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery
« Reply #38 on: May 07, 2009, 10:20:15 AM »
I am using it and haven't noticed a lot of disk activity - in fact it seems remarkably quiet and has almost no impact on day to day computer use.
Good to know.  I'll try it if I cannot manage with Rising and if I can't get Avira to correct this.
.merle1.

MerleOne

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SOLVED (was "Re: Help for solving a XP home lan mystery")
« Reply #39 on: August 31, 2009, 04:53:01 AM »
I finally found the solution to my problem, thanks to WXPNews. 

In a recent newsletter (http://www.wxpnews.c...ews-392-20090818.htm),
"How to fix a problem where you can't see other computers on the network", it says :
> Click Start | Run
> In the Run box, type regedit to start the registry editor
> Navigate to the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE \ System \ CurrentControlSet \ Services \ NetBt \ Parameters
> In the right details pane, find the values named NodeType and DhcpNodeType and delete them
> Close the registry editor and restart the computer.

And it worked !!!

 ;D
.merle1.