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Last post Author Topic: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45  (Read 11872 times)

Ehtyar

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Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« on: November 06, 2008, 06:05:06 PM »
The Weekly Tech News
TNWeekly01.gifHi all.
As most of you who frequent the IRC channel will know, this week has been my first as the Junior IT Administrator at Amnesia Razorfish. The reason I mention this is that from next week onward I will no longer be able to post the news at the usual time. It will likely be posted a day or two later than usual (though no less regularly). Hopefully I be able to determine a set time within the next fortnight.
Also, thanks to Mouse Man and Darwin for their kind words about the weekly tech news in this months newsletter.
As usual, you can find last week's news here.


1. Microsoft and Google to Offer OpenID
Spoiler
http://dev.live.com/blogs/devlive/archive/2008/10/27/421.aspx
http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/2008/10/google-moves-towards-single-sign-on.html
Google and Microsoft plan to offer OpenID services from their current sign-on mechanisms.

Quote
Currently users are required to create individual passwords for many websites they visit, but users would prefer to avoid this step so they could visits websites more easily. Similarly, many websites on the Internet have asked for a way to enable users to log into their sites without forcing them to create another password. If users could log into sites without needing another password, it would allow websites to provide a more personalized experience to their users.


2. Programming Tools for Cracking Mifare Published
Spoiler
http://www.heise-online.co.uk/security/Programming-tools-for-cracking-Mifare-published--/news/111807
Practical tools for cracking the Mifare RFID chip have been released onto the internet.

Quote
A hacker using the pseudonym Bla has published an open source tool called Crapto1 for cracking the encryption of the Mifare Classic RFID chip, as used in the Oyster Card. Besides an implementation in C of the vulnerable Crypto1 algorithm, the archive also contains the C source code for an attack that has been described in a paper by Dutch security researchers at Radboud University.

Using the tool it is said to be possible to calculate the access code of a Mifare Classic card within around two seconds. All an attacker requires is a live recording of an encrypted radio communication between the card and a legitimate reader, as well as a little programming knowledge. The access code then allows him not only to decode the encrypted data, but also to manipulate the card's content virtually without limit and to clone it to obtain services fraudulently.


3. Adobe Acrobat 8 Critically Vulnerable
Spoiler
http://www.net-security.org/secworld.php?id=6715
Acrobat 8 has a vulnerability allowing a maliciously crafted PDF file to gain unauthorized access to the systems it's running on and assume the rights of the user running it via javascript.

Quote
Core Security Technologies issued an advisory disclosing a vulnerability that could affect millions of individuals and businesses using Adobe’s Reader PDF file viewing software. Engineers from CoreLabs determined that Adobe Reader could be exploited to gain access to vulnerable systems via the use of a specially crafted PDF file with malicious JavaScript content. Upon making the discovery, CoreLabs immediately alerted Adobe to the vulnerability and the two companies have since coordinated efforts to ensure that a patch could be created and made available to protect users of the program.


4. AT&T Imposes Monthly Bandwidth Caps
Spoiler
http://www.datastronghold.com/index.php/tech-news/1480-atat-imposes-monthly-bandwidth-caps
AT&T is trialing new monthly bandwidth caps in certain areas with the monthly limit based on the speed of a user's connection (read: based on the amount of money they're paying).

Quote
Bad news off the wire for AT&T broadband customers, as AT&T has announced the fact that they are now imposing bandwidth limits in certain test areas.  Currently this market trial was started November 1 in Reno and users will get between 20 GB and 150 GB a month depending on their speed tier.  Unlike the bandwidth limitations that were imposed by companies like Time Warner and Comcast, there were only applied to new users this bandwidth cap will be applied to all users including current ones.

It seems like the long feared bandwidth caps are going to be the norm and no longer the exception to the rule when it comes to Broadband providers and home users.  My personal opinion is that bandwidth caps are not an attempt for broadband companies to provide greater service to their customers, it is an attempt for them to start charging either broadband content providers or customers for accessing broadband content.  The cable companies have seen the writing on the wall and they know that the future is TV and video being sent over Internet lines to customers houses and they want a piece of the pie.


5. Virtual Heist Nets 500,000+ Bank, Credit Accounts
Spoiler
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/securityfix/2008/10/virtual_bank_heist_nets_500000.html
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/10/31/sinowal_trojan_heist/
RSA's FraudAction Research Lab has uncovered a massive cache of stolen banking details accrued since 2006 via the Sinowal/Torpig/Mebroot trojan.

Quote
A single cyber crime group has stolen more than a half million bank, credit and debit card accounts over the past two-and-a-half years using one of the most advanced strains of computer spyware in existence, according to research to be published today. The discovery is among the largest stolen data caches ever recovered.

Researchers at RSA's FraudAction Research Lab unearthed the massive trove of purloined data while tracking the activities of a family of spyware known as the "Sinowal" Trojan, designed to steal data from Microsoft Windows PCs.


6. Man Gets 21 Months for Recording Movies in Theatre With Camcorder
Spoiler
http://www.piracyisacrime.org/In-The-Courtroom/man-gets-21-years-for-recording-movies-in-theatre-with-camcorder.html
A man has been found guilty of filming up to 100 movies in movie theatres in Washington DC and sentenced to 21 months in prison. He was caught via the use of "A Covert Anti-Camcording System" installed by the MPAA.

Quote
Michael Logan, 31, of Maryland was sentenced today in federal court in the District of Columbia for filming with a camcorder in theatres, "28 Weeks Later", “Enchanted” and maybe up 100 more movies over the last few years according to the MPAA.

Prosecutors wrote that Logan's voice could be heard on a pirated version of the film "28 Weeks Later," which MPAA investigators purchased on the streets of New York on May 11 and May 15 of last year. Investigators believe that Logan recorded that film May 11 at the Regal Cinemas, prosecutors wrote.


7. Google Abandons Deal With Yahoo
Spoiler
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7711429.stm
Google has abandoned their advertising deal with Yahoo to avoid the legal rammifications.

Quote
The deal involved Google providing some of the advertising around Yahoo's search results and would have been worth $800m (£494m) a year to Yahoo.

It was originally announced in June but has faced anti-trust objections.

Yahoo said in a statement it was disappointed that Google had decided not to fight for the deal in court.


8. Yahoo Tells Microsoft: 'Buy Us'
Spoiler
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7712298.stm
Yahoo's CEO Jerry Yang has commented that Microsoft would still benefit from acquiring the company. His comments come on the tail of Google pulling out of the ad deal with them.

Quote
The internet portal's co-founder and CEO Jerry Yang made the comment despite the fact Yahoo rejected a $33 (£21) a share offer from Microsoft back in May.

Mr Yang's suggestion also came hours after Google pulled out of an internet advertising partnership with Yahoo.

"To this day the best thing for Microsoft to do is buy Yahoo," said Mr Yang.


9. French Pirates Face Net Cut-off
Spoiler
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7706014.stm
Anyone caught sharing pirated digital media in France will receive warnings before having their internet connection terminated under new legislation.

Quote
The French Senate voted overwhelmingly in favour of the law, which aims to tackle ongoing piracy of music, movies, and games online.

Those caught illegally sharing digital media will get warnings e-mailed and posted to them before having their net connection terminated.


10. Fire Fear Sparks Battery Recall
Spoiler
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7701348.stm
Discussion by app103: http://www.donationcoder.com/forum/index.php?topic=15546
Devices containing batteries manufactured by Sony over a period of almost a year will be recalled by the likes of HP, Toshiba and DELL due to overheating fears.

Quote
Sony said the recall came after 40 instances of overheating, including four cases where users had minor burns.

The recall affects around 74,000 HP laptops, 14,400 from Toshiba, and small numbers from Dell, Acer and Lenovo.

Sony said the affected batteries were caused by a production line problem between October 2004 and June 2005.


11. British Tax Website Shut Down After Data Breach
Spoiler
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1082402/Tax-website-shut-memory-stick-secret-personal-data-12million-pub-car-park.html
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-10081737-83.html
A memory stick found in a pub car park contating the tax details of 12 million people has forced the british goverment to shut down a taxation-related website.

Quote
Ministers have been forced to order an emergency shutdown of a key Government computer system to protect millions of people's private details.

The action was taken after a memory stick was found in a pub car park containing confidential passcodes to the online Government Gateway system, which covers everything from tax returns to parking tickets.

An urgent investigation is now under way into how the stick, belonging to the company which runs the flagship system, came to be lost.


12. WPA Wi-Fi Encryption is Cracked
Spoiler
http://www.itworld.com/security/57285/once-thought-safe-wpa-wi-fi-encryption-cracked
http://news.cnet.com/8301-10789_3-10083861-57.html
WPA has taken a huge security hit as attackers use a protocol weakness and a mathematical breakthrough to break TKIP keys in order to read and/or forge data being sent from an access point to a client machine.

Quote
Security researchers say they've developed a way to partially crack the Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) encryption standard used to protect data on many wireless networks.

The attack, described as the first practical attack on WPA, will be discussed at the PacSec conference in Tokyo next week. There, researcher Erik Tews will show how he was able to crack WPA encryption, in order to read data being sent from a router to a laptop computer. The attack could also be used to send bogus information to a client connected to the router.


13. Porn Breath Tests for PCs Heralds 'stop and Scan'
Spoiler
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/11/05/smut_tests_for_pcs/
New software developed by an Australian University will allow officials to quickly identify illicit images on PCs.

Quote
Technology that claims to pick up traces of illicit images on PCs has attracted the interest of Australian cops. The software, developed in an Australian University, might eventually be used to screen PCs for pr0n during border inspections.

Compared to breath test tools used by the police in a different context, the software - developed at Perth's Edith Cowan University in association with local police from Western Australia - is undergoing beta testing.


14. Hackers Jailbreak T-Mobile's Googlephone
Spoiler
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/11/05/google_android_jailbreak/
The Googlephone has already been broken by a hacker who determined you can acquire root privileges in Android by telneting to the device.

Quote
Hackers have managed to jailbreak T-Mobile's new G1 phone by exploiting a gaping loophole in Android, the open source operating system supplied by Google.

The hack, which was posted to this XDA-Developers forum, is a straight-forward process that allows Linux geeks to gain root access in about one minute. It involves using the widely available PTerminal application to telnet to the device's IP address. Presto, you now have root.


15. Fake Site Punts Trojanised WordPress
Spoiler
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/11/06/trojanised_wordpress/
Wordpress hacker are at it again with a website offering an upgrade to the software which includes a Trojan. The website has spread via a vulnerability in older Wordpress versions which allows an attacker to redirect visitors to another website.

Quote
Fraudsters have set up a fake site featuring a backdoored version of the WordPress blogging application as part of a sophisticated malware-based attack.

The fake Wordpresz.org site offered up what purports to be version 2.6.4 of the open source blogging tool. In reality all but one of the files are identical to the latest pukka (2.6.3) version of WordPress.


16. National ID Cards Compulsory for U.K. Airport Staff
Spoiler
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-10083732-83.html
Airport staff in the U.K. will be required to carry one of the new National Identity cards at two airports trialing the new system.

Quote
A pilot program of the U.K.'s national identity card plan will be compulsory at one of the two participating airports.

Workers will be required to enroll in the program at London city airport, the Home Office said Thursday. The move comes despite repeated assurances from the Home Office that U.K. citizens will not be compelled to have an ID card or enter their biometric details onto the National Identity Register.

Also on Thursday, the government said that retailers, post offices, and banks can apply to become biometrics enrollment sites for the cards.


17. Remote Buffer Overflow Bug Bites Linux Kernel
Spoiler
http://blogs.zdnet.com/security/?p=2121
A buffer overflow vulnerability in a common Linux Kernel wireless driver could permit an attacker to remotely execute code with Kernel privileges, or cause a denial of service condition.

Quote
A remote buffer overflow vulnerability in the Linux Kernel could be exploited by attackers to execute code or cripple affected systems, according to a Gentoo bug report that just became public.

The flaw could allow malicious hackers to launch arbitrary code with kernel-level privileges.  This could lead to complete system compromise or, in some cases if an exploit fails, result in denial-of-service attacks.


18. EndNote Reverse-engineering Case Looks Headed to Courtroom
Spoiler
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20081104-endnote-reverse-engineering-case-looks-headed-to-courtroom.html
EndNote has accused the open source Firefox extension Zotero of illegally reverse engineering their proprietary .ens file format.

Quote
As anyone who works in academia knows, writing and publishing papers involves frequently citing the existing literature. When you're working on a paper with 30 or more references, keeping track of them all can be a downright pain, which is where reference-managing software like Thomson Reuters' EndNote comes in. EndNote is the market leader in this field, but recently it has been facing competition from the open source Zotero, which is a Firefox plugin that lets you manage your bibliographic library and insert references into papers. Right now though, EndNote and Zotero are locked in a legal battle over claims by Thomson Reuters that the developers of Zotero have illegally reverse-engineered aspects of EndNote.


19. FCC White Spaces Decision Kicks Off the Next Wireless Revolution
Spoiler
http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2008/11/fccs-decision-t.html
The FCC will permit transmissions over unused "white space" spectrum which will allow cheaper wireless.

Quote
The Federal Communications Commission's decision to open up the 'white spaces' spectrum to unlicensed devices could usher in a new telecom revolution, say analysts.

Like WiFi, the availability of free, unregulated spectrum could create new technologies and new markets, bringing superfast wireless connectivity to the masses. Unlike WiFi, it could also put pressure on wireless carriers.

"All the PR spin and FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) failed in the face of physics and the ground reality of engineering," says Sascha Meinrath, research director of the wireless future program at the New America Foundation, a non-partisan public policy think-tank.


20. Firefox Hits 20% Browser Share Worldwide (yay!)
Spoiler
http://www.webmonkey.com/blog/Firefox_Hits_20PERC_Browser_Share_Worldwide
Adoption of Mozilla's Firefox browser has hit 20% across the globe.

Quote
Mozilla is reporting that Firefox topped 20% of the worldwide market share for web browsers for the first time ever in October, 2008. Firefox broke the 20% mark twice last month, once during the week of October 5, and once again during the week of October 26. During the other two weeks, its share was around 19.8%, putting the average for the month just above below the 20% mark at 19.9%


Ehtyar.

ewemoa

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2008, 06:18:57 PM »
Thanks again for this week's edition!  Good luck w/ the new job :)

mouser

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2008, 06:22:21 PM »
GREAT GREAT news this week -- best one yet.

The #18 Endnote case infuriates me.. This company, Thomson Reuters, has worked hard to create a monopoly in the academic world of bibliography stuff.  They have bought out and killed off competitors, priced things out of the hands of students, and now this.  Disgusting.

Darwin

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2008, 06:30:58 PM »
priced things out of the hands of students

That's an understatement... About the only ray of light WRT their pricing scheme is that many (but certainly not all) universities have deals with Thomson enabling the univ to provide very cheap or even free licences for Endnote to their students. Sadly, my university was not one of them and I bought my own licence.

Anyway, great newsletter, ehtyar  :Thmbsup: Case in point: I never would have heard about the silly Endnote litigation if I hadn't clicked on the link to your roundup  :o
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

housetier

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2008, 07:08:04 PM »
This just made me donate to Ehtyar  :Thmbsup:

zridling

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2008, 09:27:12 PM »
Ehtyar, I appreciate you pooling these stories rather than posting them individually. It's nice to come here and spend some time reading through quite a few of them. (And it makes it really easy to find them the second time around.)

Deozaan

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2008, 09:46:15 PM »
Thanks Ehtyar, and congrats on the new position as Jr. IT Admin!

Amnesia Razorfish wouldn't happen to be the Australian internet censoring company would it? ;) :P


zridling

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2008, 11:18:58 PM »
"Remote Buffer Overflow Bug Bites Linux Kernel"
- actually fixed back in early October when it was found (Ubuntu patched it within 24 hours). Another reason to open source drivers, so many eyes can see the problem.

J-Mac

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2008, 12:00:17 AM »
priced things out of the hands of students

That's an understatement... About the only ray of light WRT their pricing scheme is that many (but certainly not all) universities have deals with Thomson enabling the univ to provide very cheap or even free licences for Endnote to their students. Sadly, my university was not one of them and I bought my own licence.

Anyway, great newsletter, ehtyar  :Thmbsup: Case in point: I never would have heard about the silly Endnote litigation if I hadn't clicked on the link to your roundup  :o

As soon as I read the news item about Endnote I knew I would soon be reading a comment about it from you, Mr. Darwin!  :D  You've mentioned your use of Endnote enough! I'm curious: Have you tried Zotero? If so, how does it measure up against Endnote?

BTW, I have fallen hard into love with your newsletter, ehtyar! Truly excellent!!  Thank you for this.

Jim

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2008, 03:56:11 AM »
13. Porn Breath Tests for PCs Heralds 'stop and Scan'

Quote
"The disc goes into the CD-ROM drive of the PC and if files are found, the user connects a USB-DVD writer to the back of the computer, and the images that are stored in memory in the RAM of the computer are written to the DVD," Professor Valli said. "Nothing gets written to the original evidence at all, which is the key."


This thing doesn't scan for deleted files and there's no mention of any uber-sophisticated (or otherwise) decryption+pattern search technology either. Wonder how many child pornographers innocent shlobs with nudies of their wives/girlfriends will be ensnared by this little beauty.


Darwin

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2008, 07:19:12 AM »
Have you tried Zotero? If so, how does it measure up against Endnote?

I did try Zotero at one point and was very impressed. However, I have over 6000 articles and books entered into Endnote and didn't really putting Zotero through its paces. I have Firefox installed on my other machine and will take another look - if it will import Endnote indexes and integrate with Word, I may be a convert. Endnote keeps adding functionality, but the yearly upgrade at $80 to get the added functionality is steep.
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

Darwin

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2008, 12:02:48 PM »
Impressive. Zotero DOES have a Word add-in and (apparently) you can import an Endnote database into it. Unfortunately, I cannot get my database imported  :( Will keep trying... If I didn't already have Endnote (I've been using it since 2000) and have so much invested into it re: time and references, I'd stick with Zotero.
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

Ehtyar

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2008, 02:06:30 PM »
Thanks everyone :)
Thanks Ehtyar, and congrats on the new position as Jr. IT Admin!

Amnesia Razorfish wouldn't happen to be the Australian internet censoring company would it? ;) :P
Ahahaha, would you believe Amnesia don't even filter their own internet traffic?  :tellme:
"Remote Buffer Overflow Bug Bites Linux Kernel"
- actually fixed back in early October when it was found (Ubuntu patched it within 24 hours). Another reason to open source drivers, so many eyes can see the problem.
Thanks for the info zridling. I forgot to mention in the metanews as I should have that a few of the stories are older than a week as I forgot to check my read-it-later-list last week.

Once I get my browser back (backup in progress) I intend to try Zotero myself. Though I'll have little use for it I'll let everyone know how things go.

Ehtyar.

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2008, 08:46:22 PM »
Number 5:

Quote
A single cyber crime group has stolen more than a half million bank, credit and debit card accounts over the past two-and-a-half years using one of the most advanced strains of computer spyware in existence, according to research to be published today. The discovery is among the largest stolen data caches ever recovered.

Am I the only one wondering when these things surface: How would you know whether your data was among that which was obtained?  Can you check some how? 

I think some (many?) people have more than one account at the same bank (e.g. savings + checkings) say, so perhaps a better thing to focus on is how many individuals' details have been compromised -- the current estimate could easily be inflated by a fair bit)...but then I guess the total numbers thrown around in the news would be smaller and it just wouldn't be as attention-grabbing...

Bonus question: so, what's the chance any given individual Internet user is directly affected? :)

J-Mac

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2008, 01:07:44 PM »
13. Porn Breath Tests for PCs Heralds 'stop and Scan'

Quote
"The disc goes into the CD-ROM drive of the PC and if files are found, the user connects a USB-DVD writer to the back of the computer, and the images that are stored in memory in the RAM of the computer are written to the DVD," Professor Valli said. "Nothing gets written to the original evidence at all, which is the key."


This thing doesn't scan for deleted files and there's no mention of any uber-sophisticated (or otherwise) decryption+pattern search technology either. Wonder how many child pornographers innocent shlobs with nudies of their wives/girlfriends will be ensnared by this little beauty.



Or someone else's wives or girlfriends...  ;D  8)

Jim

(And if you don’t ever hear from me again, you'll know that my darling, lovely wife saw this...   :) )
« Last Edit: November 09, 2008, 01:12:00 PM by J-Mac »

J-Mac

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2008, 01:10:50 PM »
Impressive. Zotero DOES have a Word add-in and (apparently) you can import an Endnote database into it. Unfortunately, I cannot get my database imported  :( Will keep trying... If I didn't already have Endnote (I've been using it since 2000) and have so much invested into it re: time and references, I'd stick with Zotero.

Cool! I looked at their videos and tutorials and it looks great. Unfortunately I don’t think I perform enough true research to justify using it.  :( I have a feeling that it would be a case of using a sledgehammer to swat at a mosquito.

I will probably give it a try anyway, but I think it may be serious overkill for me.

Thanks!

Jim

Ehtyar

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2008, 01:26:25 PM »
Unfortunately I don’t think I perform enough true research to justify using it.  :( I have a feeling that it would be a case of using a sledgehammer to swat at a mosquito.

I will probably give it a try anyway, but I think it may be serious overkill for me.
Ditto, but I just installed it anyway :P

Ehtyar.

J-Mac

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #17 on: November 09, 2008, 01:36:39 PM »
Unfortunately I don’t think I perform enough true research to justify using it.  :( I have a feeling that it would be a case of using a sledgehammer to swat at a mosquito.

I will probably give it a try anyway, but I think it may be serious overkill for me.
Ditto, but I just installed it anyway :P

Ehtyar.

Uh-oh - another software junkie! (And how often do you reinstall Windows?  ;D)

Jim

Ehtyar

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2008, 01:50:49 PM »
Uh-oh - another software junkie! (And how often do you reinstall Windows?  ;D)

Jim
Every 6 months if i can manage it. I have as much portable software as possible to ease the transition. I currently have 53 addons installed in my Firefox (probably use about 75% of them) though it's about time for another clean out methinks.
If you wanna know how many you have without counting, download Extension List Dumper.

Ehtyar.

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #19 on: November 09, 2008, 03:17:36 PM »
Uh-oh - another software junkie! (And how often do you reinstall Windows?  ;D)

Jim
Every 6 months if i can manage it. I have as much portable software as possible to ease the transition. I currently have 53 addons installed in my Firefox (probably use about 75% of them) though it's about time for another clean out methinks.
If you wanna know how many you have without counting, download Extension List Dumper.

Ehtyar.

Nah, I still use the tried and true InfoLister. That's worked well for me for a few years now.

Thanks!

Jim

Darwin

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #20 on: November 09, 2008, 04:38:21 PM »
I no longer reinstall windows, per se. I use Acronis True Image to revert to a good image of my system and have documents and program settings (where possible) on a separate partition. I guess that amounts to reinstalling windows... However, it's been at least 18 months since I've had to do it.
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

J-Mac

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2008, 08:48:01 PM »
Ever since True Image Home 11, Acronis has become pretty unreliable IMO.

Jim

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2008, 10:47:18 PM »
Ever since True Image Home 11, Acronis has become pretty unreliable IMO.

Jim

That's why I use Echo Workstation version - haven't used a home version since 9 (which was fine in my usage).
"Some people have a way with words, other people,... oh... have not way" - Steve Martin

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #23 on: December 07, 2008, 05:53:06 PM »
Ever since True Image Home 11, Acronis has become pretty unreliable IMO.

Jim

That's why I use Echo Workstation version - haven't used a home version since 9 (which was fine in my usage).

Ha,ha...I still use version 9 home.  Does everything I want and is pretty much as reliable as Ghost (which we use at work).

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Re: Tech News Weekly: Edition 45
« Reply #24 on: December 08, 2008, 12:09:42 AM »
Ever since True Image Home 11, Acronis has become pretty unreliable IMO.

Jim

That's why I use Echo Workstation version - haven't used a home version since 9 (which was fine in my usage).

Ha,ha...I still use version 9 home.  Does everything I want and is pretty much as reliable as Ghost (which we use at work).

Yeah, TI10 was the start of some troubles I saw with TI. 11 presented more issues yet. V.9 was probably the version most compatible with the various OS configurations and also with most external USB drives. I think ATI10 added their own burning engine for DVD burning; in V.9 you had to store the image on an internal HDD, but of course you could then easily move that image to a DVD the old-fashioned way: just drag it to the optical drive in Win Explorer! Actually that is how I still do it, as Acronis's in-built burner is pretty poor - and very slow.

ATI 11 has generated a lot of complaints at Wilders Security forum from long-time, usually loyal users. But for about a month or so after the 2009 version was released the screaming about it was crazy at Wilders. I mean, even the most true-blue Acronis backers there were refusing to use it, even after purchasing the upgrade. Which is why I was extremely surprised to see Gizmo's (Ian Richards) glowing review of the latest version in the most recent Windows Secrets newsletter. I haven't been back to their forum at Wilders for three or four weeks so I don’t know if they released an amazing update or what!

Thanks!

Jim