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Author Topic: Royal Bank of Scotland Customer Details Sold on eBay  (Read 1808 times)

Ehtyar

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Royal Bank of Scotland Customer Details Sold on eBay
« on: August 27, 2008, 05:10:39 PM »
An ex-employee of archiving firm Graphic Data has sold a laptop containing the credit card details of 1 million Royal Bank of Scotland customers on eBay.

Screenshot - 28_08_2008 , 10_59_03 AM_thumb.png

Quote
Media reports said details of more than a million customers of Royal Bank of Scotland, American Express and NatWest were found on the computer sold for 35 pounds on the auction and shopping website.

RBS said the information included historical data related to credit card applications and data from other banks, but would not disclose further details.

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Ehtyar.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2008, 04:39:01 PM by Ehtyar »

katykaty

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Re: Royal Bank of Scotland Sells 1 Million Customer Details on eBay
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2008, 11:15:34 AM »
The Royal Bank of Scotland has sold a laptop containing 1 million customer credit card details on eBay.
No it hasn't. Someone else has. Read the story again.

mnemonic

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Re: Royal Bank of Scotland Sells 1 Million Customer Details on eBay
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2008, 01:00:03 PM »
I'm surprised that this can still happen when pretty much all companies have a policy of full-disk encrypting every laptop that leaves their buildings these days.

Still, this is meat-and-drink to the UK press.  For instance, I saw very few headlines about this one.

http://www.computera...nce-service-999-data

I guess that "security policy saves the personal data of hundreds of thousands" is far less sexy than "people's surnames lost in definitely world-ending, total IT incompetence muck-up by complete idiots".