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Author Topic: Hardware AES-encrypted harddrive, cool - but...!  (Read 1738 times)

f0dder

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Hardware AES-encrypted harddrive, cool - but...!
« on: February 19, 2008, 07:33:19 AM »
Quote
The specifications of the 2.5in. Easy Nova Data Box PRO-25UE RFID[1] hard drive case by German vendor Drecom sound promising: hardware data encryption with 128-bit AES, access control via an RFID chip compact enough to carry around on your key ring and optional 160GB or 250GB hard disk capacity. Swiping the RFID chip along the case causes the integrated Innmax IM7206 crypto controller to reveal the drive as a USB 2.0 mass storage compatible device to the attached computer. This works under Linux and Mac OS X as well as Windows. There's no need for special drivers.

Sounds good, doesn't it? Too bad it's the marketing people who've been pushing their snake oil once again.
- carpe noctem

jgpaiva

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Re: Hardware AES-encrypted harddrive, cool - but...!
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2008, 07:43:50 AM »
Here's the bottom-line:
Quote
These regular repetitions continued, and the almost identical columns of numbers suggest that the 512-byte sectors of your drive are not in fact encrypted with AES, but merely with a constant 512-byte cipher block applied as an XOR (exclusive OR).

This is really serious since it's (almost) as good as no encryption at all and definitelly not the encryption advertised!
People who sell this kind of stuff should be prosecuted for fooling their costumers!