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Author Topic: oink is dead: what is next? (music lovers united)  (Read 2836 times)


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oink is dead: what is next? (music lovers united)
« on: November 07, 2007, 05:55:20 AM »
I never managed to get an invitation to oink, and now it's dead...
But I found a fantastic review of what goes on on the music industry today, and how the internet can self-organize into a better service than any of the paid ones (take that, industry!).

See also the thread at hydrogen audio:
For quite a long time I've been intending to post some sort of commentary on the music industry - piracy, distribution, morality, those types of things. I've thought about it many times, but never gone through with it, because the issue is such a broad, messy one - such a difficult thing to address fairly and compactly. I knew it would result in a rambly, unfocused commentary, and my exact opinion has teetered back and forth quite a bit over the years anyway. But on Monday, when I woke up to the news that Oink, the world famous torrent site and mecca for music-lovers everywhere, had been shut down by international police and various anti-piracy groups, I knew it was finally time to try and organize my thoughts on this huge, sticky, important issue.

clipboard11_7_2007 _ 12_52_35.jpg

from http://www.demonbaby...death-of-oink-birth-


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Re: oink is dead: what is next? (music lovers united)
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2007, 03:18:35 PM »
Brilliant article. Everyone should read it. Memorable side quote for me:
A lot of people point to the Radiohead model as the future, but Radiohead is only dipping its toe into the future to test the waters. What at first seemed like a rainbow-colored revolution has now been openly revealed as a marketing gimmick: Radiohead was "experimenting," releasing a low-quality MP3 version of an album only to punish the fans who paid for it by later releasing a full-quality CD version with extra tracks. According to Radiohead's manager: "If we didn't believe that when people hear the music they will want to buy the CD then we wouldn't do what we are doing." Ouch. Radiohead was moving in the right direction, but if they really want to start a revolution, they need to place the "pay-what-you-want" digital album on the same content and quality level as the "pay-what-we-want" physical album.