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Last post Author Topic: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?  (Read 32507 times)

sword

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Re: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?
« Reply #50 on: August 15, 2009, 01:32:29 PM »
I should probably have mentioned that the quotes came from 'smeraldo' August 11, 2009 08:47:24, who seems to have raised the topic again. Sorry for any confusion, J-Mac.
Yes, it is the way I tag. I'm one of those who got bogged down with too many tags early on and settled on the simple system of adding a small number of tags to the filename.
Cheers, Robert

J-Mac

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Re: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?
« Reply #51 on: August 16, 2009, 12:04:38 AM »
OK - Thanks Robert. Maybe I was just sleepy but when I first read your post I couldn't quite get my head around it!

Jim

smeraldo

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Re: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?
« Reply #52 on: August 19, 2009, 05:11:39 AM »
thank you sword for your answer
I might not completely understand all the details so far, but it is definitely very interesting

Quote
All pages/data gathered with FireFox, organized in RTF, JPG or BMP and sent to temporary formatting folders
I'm not sure that my understanding of this is the correct one, it is maybe a language issue or a "my brain" issue, but if you'd like to gimme a little explanation, feel free to do it

and this is interesting too
Quote
I'm one of those who got bogged down with too many tags early on and settled on the simple system of adding a small number of tags to the filename.

sword

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Re: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?
« Reply #53 on: August 20, 2009, 02:32:07 PM »
   
smeraldo,

Original:   
Re: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?
« Reply #52 on: Today at 04:11:39 AM »

"if you'd like to gimme a little explanation, feel free to do it '...gathered...organized...sent to temporary formatting folders...' "
and "and this is interesting too 'adding a small number of tags to the filename' ".


Reply:

Short:
Save all with a unique name. Add section numbers or 'types'. Format. Add notes, summaries and tags. Transfer to sections for processing.

Details:
All searches and sessions get saved by a filename that is a number, representing the date. Today (August 20, 2009) is 9820. This number remains wherever the file is moved or whenever it is edited. Today's first session gets an 'a' tacked on and an optional 'type' such as 'S' for search or 'section' such as '33' for (gthgly) [gather genealogy]. All files [ about fifty in two weeks] are saved to partition 'E:" and a brief list of keywords is added at the top of the file. Every couple of weeks these files are saved to CD and, for about sixty percent of all files, that is all that is done. File summaries are made about every two weeks as well, where filenames and keywords are collected and saved in a file named by date range, M, to date range such as 9726M9708. For the more valuable files I add paragraph numbering of the clips, some section number to the filename and usually a brief summary before saving to 'E:'. The best of these files get edited with highlighting and notes before saving to 'E:'. Only about five percent of the best files get a tag added to the filename. The files with section numbers and tags are moved to one of two other boxes for the interesting processing in Wordperfect, Publisher or OneNote and the information is put in tables, outlines or charts for easier analysis. The folder layout on these boxes is numerical: 1 [for pln/plan], 11 [plnorg/plan organize] and the numbering is deeper, such as1511[plan interests art watercolor]. I don't need the section numbers or types any more so a 'quality' number is added to the front of the filename before saving. The end result is something easily read, like an outline, easily searched [find and list files with the tag "plnhow" containing the name "photoshop"] and easily changed or moved, since they are by number. I end up with something like a reference manual or 'how-to' for topics and interests.
The main thing is that the system is easy to use, read or search and can be implemented in any application because the file names have the same components and the summary information is the same in FireFox, saved files, WordPerfect and all other applications.
This might look quite complicated but it can be simple and easy to use. Setting up the folders is the hardest part. Then save, add type or section to the name, format, tag and use.

Reply:

Short:
Tags are folder name combinations added to important material to aid searches.

Details:
For me, interests and projects change a lot over time. I needed a tag system that did not change [too hard to remember]. Since the general layout of folders remains constant, I use the 'parent folder name' plus 'child folder name' for the tag. I add this to the end of the filename for the best files. Most are self-explanatory and easy to remember, such as 'plnhow' for plan how. Currently I'm using 'gthsrc' [gather search] and 'fnfppl' [file information people] a lot. There are usually about ten or twelve tags that get used a lot. Later, after the files get processed and put in an outline of folders [see above], I can view the files because they are in the right sections and tagged and have a value added to the front of the filename. Tips about formatting WordPerfect macros can be found under section 5211 [5=tip, 2=fmt, 1=wpr, 1=mac] and the filename is usually of the form 6B9820aStipfmt. I find it easy to change the 'value' of the information by changing the first number in the name [ 6=excellent, 7=good, 8=fair, 9=poor]. B means 'best' and it is one of several optional 'types' A-J [A=easiest, B=best...H=portable...].

sword

Armando

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Re: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?
« Reply #54 on: August 20, 2009, 11:44:41 PM »
The problem with 1- using numbers like this 2- single letters, etc. is that it's very hard to find/filter or do some batch changes.
I can do batch changes, and rename 1000s of files with regular expressions because all fields are clearly and uniquely delimited. Yes, to have a manageable system like that, each data field must be uniquely delimited, and tags too must be in a format that's unique (searching for a single number or a for a word would give 10s of thousands of results on my computer; however searching for one of my special tags will always bring the right files -- each tag is unique and can't even be found as a part of a word or number)

IainB

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Re: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?
« Reply #55 on: November 26, 2016, 03:22:16 AM »
Cross-posted from: Re: Interesting: Tag2Find, Tagging for All Filetypes for Windows

Bump

Almost a decade on.

Still searching but has anyone discovered a good way of tagging files in windows?
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+1 for tagspaces
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Interesting you ask! I have abandoned my quest a long time ago, but I just googled tag2find, etc. and found this

https://www.tagspaces.org

It's open source -- a great thing for that type of software...

The funny thing is that it implements the same solution I implemented myself 8-9 years ago. Basically, to avoid compatibility problems, writing the tags directly in the file names, using specific tag delimiters, etc. I described my method somewhere on DC. (Wonder if someone in their team read my description of if they just reached the same conclusions after an analysis of the situation.)

After at least 8-9 years tagging my files this way, I'm still finding it convenient. Using it every single day. People laugh when they see my file names, but I smile... they don't realize that I can group files on "any" subject (or combinations of subjects) in just a few seconds... in any OS or file system.
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@Armando: Yes, tagging the filename currently seems to be the only easy and practicable/feasible approach for meeting all one's tag/search requirements, and for a whole bunch of reasons. Essentially, the problem is solved by putting meta-data codes/keys (strings of A-N text) into the filename.

The main advantages of this approach would seem to be:
  • Tagging can more easily be made reliable, available, consistent and visible at the lowest common denominator (the filename, visible in any file browser and not locked-in to a separate/proprietary viewer; no use is made of the ADS, Registry, or a proprietary indexing system).
  • The file tags are persistent and easily changed if required - individually, or in batches (any filename editing utility, or mass filename editor will do; no proprietary tool is required and no use is made of the ADS).
  • The index database for the tags can be a common and non-proprietary utility already on the Desktop - e.g., the index database of (say) WDS (Windows Desktop Search), or other file indexing/search system of choice - e.g., I often use Everything.
  • If required, the tags searched can be treated as being in a structured notional/virtual hierarchy (regardless of their location on disk) - which can enable very powerful/useful filtered searches.
  • The structure of a notional/virtual hierarchy can be easily changed at any time, as required and without necessarily invalidating the tags already in use.

Aside from the perhaps visibly sometimes odd-looking filenames, the main disadvantage would probably be that tags make file names longer, potentially causing the LFN (Long File Name) or "path/file name too long" problem at some stage - where (say) nesting of files/folders occurs where longish file names have been employed. This PITA can especially occur in backup/archive directories/subdirectories, even though the original file paths may have no LFN problem.

However, the LFN hack in Windows 10 (only) apparently overcomes this problem in NTFS systems, though I am unsure whether it applies also to FAT file systems under all conditions, and certainly it apparently only works for Windows 10, and not the earlier Windows OS versions.

I recall there was a freeware app ("Tag-something" - maybe it was Tagspaces, but I forget the name) that ran as a Firefox extension, or something, enabling a tagging system in the file names. Out of interest, I tried it out and found it quite good, but it felt a bit clunky and was kinda superfluous, given that the filename tagging tool can be whatever tool one uses to edit file names - singly or en masse.
It used delimiters to identify the tags (thus potentially making the filename even longer), and I could never quite see a solid reason as to why delimiters might be mandatory, never mind desirable. So, I use tags in the filename, but not delimiters.
I am therefore curious to know your reasoning on this, as you write that you use delimiters. Could you please describe that?
(Thanks.)

EDIT: By the way, I, like you, have used tags embedded in the filename for years - starting in 1998, whilst needing a tagging capability on a large document management exercise. The users had differently (non-standard) configured PCs and we badly needed an LCD (lowest common denominator) approach, so that any user could use the tagging system, regardless of PC configuration or Win0S. Using filename tags was simple/easy for the users to understand as well.
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Hi IainB,
I generously described the method I use there .
IMO, delimiters are fundamental if you want to have tags in file names and some flexibility -- e.g. modifying tags in batch -- or any part of the file name -- without ruining your file names.
I actually use several types of delimiters and use regex and software like Renamer to batch modify file names. Geeky, but works well.
 
(BTW, the reasons I described back then -- numbered and all... -- for using filenames are almost the same as yours!  ;D )
____________________________

@Armando: Ah, thanks for that thread link. I think I understand your rationale a little better now. I didn't realise that you are using Regex and that you probably need to be using delimiters and sometimes using tags that may even contain meta-data about the tag hierarchy.
I consider that you are using a system with the potential for a high degree of granularity/definition, but it has the potential to defeat one of my earlier objectives, which was that the tags needed to be simple/easy for the users to understand and use.
Having said that, I reckon your approach may turn out to be the only way to go - using the available common technology.

Food for thought!    :Thmbsup:

By the way, it's probably not surprising that the reasons you described in that old thread, for using filenames, are almost the same as those that I gave. If it's a common problem in a common OS, with common constraints to a solution, then - given the nature of filenames - the solutions are probably going to be few in number and closely similar.

Rather than take this Tag2Find thread off-track, it might be worth bumping that old thread to discuss anything else about this: Re: How do you tag (or even organize) your files?

EDIT: I have cross-posted the salient bits to that thread anyway, just in case they might be useful.
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