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126  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: DeskRule: A new kind of desktop search engine is born (ß testers wanted) on: February 23, 2014, 11:35:54 AM

I dunno.

Per the Info Mgt threads, I put about six keywords into my file names. About 1-3 times a year I do a "drive read" into a text file. Then searching the text file is over 20 times faster than Win Search.

So I'm not sure what this new approach has to offer. I don't do many obscure searches.
127  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: 20th Annual International Deming Research Seminar - March 3-4, 2014 (NY, USA). on: February 20, 2014, 06:03:23 PM
Deming was way too conceptual, compared to other quality philosophers of that time, especially Juran and populist Crosby.

Tomos, here is summary of Mr. Deming, taken from my specialisation project and master thesis, condensed for forum:

Quote
William Edwards Deming is considered to be the pioneer and the founder of the quality movement. After Second World War he was involved in planning of the Japanese Census. At that time Japanese engineers were studying Shewart's methods and techniques...

Oh, That guy. From what I recall of the story told when the factory I was working at years ago was being switched over to Just In Time (JIT) manufacturing. These techniques were indeed so new and revolutionary at the time that the current prevailing wisdom infested business establishment in the US had flat out laughed at him, and then basically foisted him on the Japanese after the war. Which then backfired rather handily for the Japanese and is much of the why the current top selling car in the US a currently the Toyota Corolla ... And has been for something like the past 12 years (which annoys me to no end).
Deming was way too conceptual, compared to other quality philosophers of that time, especially Juran and populist Crosby.

Tomos, here is summary of Mr. Deming, taken from my specialisation project and master thesis, condensed for forum:

Quote
William Edwards Deming is considered to be the pioneer and the founder of the quality movement. After Second World War he was involved in planning of the Japanese Census. At that time Japanese engineers were studying Shewart's methods and techniques. Since Deming was a student of Walter Andrew Shewhart, they decided to invite him help them rebuild the Japanese economy. Deming's work in Japan resulted in Japanese factories dominating the manufacturing sector with high quality and low cost. Ironically, his methods gained recognition in United States after his death. His major contributions to the quality management field are:

  • The Fourteen Points
  • The Deadly Diseases
  • The System of Profound Knowledge
  • Deming Wheel (PDCA is its offshot)

Now, the real value is in understanding his "System of Profound Knowledge", which is the basis for application of The Fourteen Points of transformation. With its four points it advocates holistic approach: appreciation of a system, knowledge of variation, theory of knowledge and knowledge of psychology. It was way ahead of its time, since scientific management was dominant managerial approach at that time.

Hi At
Deming was way too conceptual, compared to other quality philosophers of that time, especially Juran and populist Crosby.

Tomos, here is summary of Mr. Deming, taken from my specialisation project and master thesis, condensed for forum:

Quote
William Edwards Deming is considered to be the pioneer and the founder of the quality movement. After Second World War he was involved in planning of the Japanese Census. At that time Japanese engineers were studying Shewart's methods and techniques. Since Deming was a student of Walter Andrew Shewhart, they decided to invite him help them rebuild the Japanese economy. Deming's work in Japan resulted in Japanese factories dominating the manufacturing sector with high quality and low cost. Ironically, his methods gained recognition in United States after his death. His major contributions to the quality management field are:

  • The Fourteen Points
  • The Deadly Diseases
  • The System of Profound Knowledge
  • Deming Wheel (PDCA is its offshot)

Now, the real value is in understanding his "System of Profound Knowledge", which is the basis for application of The Fourteen Points of transformation. With its four points it advocates holistic approach: appreciation of a system, knowledge of variation, theory of knowledge and knowledge of psychology. It was way ahead of its time, since scientific management was dominant managerial approach at that time.

Hello Attronarch,

Is your thesis available for private perusal? I would like a copy of it if possible.

smiley

128  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Old Rubik's Cube book rediscovered via the Internet. I love you Internet. on: February 20, 2014, 07:40:08 AM
I also had one of those books as a kid, never really managed to get any good at solving the cube back then though. It's quite annoying that it's so much harder to solve by actually thinking about what to do, compared to just blindly applying some simple systematic rules embarassed.

A couple of years ago I revisited it because our son found a cube, so I google'd a bit and ended up using Tyson Mao's beginner method (video). It's not the fastest way to do it by far, but I found it fairly easy to follow, and the moves you need have a certain rhythm to them that somehow made them easier to remember for me, and it does let you comfortably solve any cube in under two minutes without really thinking much about what you're doing.

Exactly Jibz, hence my big note above.

Also, Tyson Mao's video is the same method as the Nourse book, except upside down and missing for me what was the whole secret of the cube itself, which was about piece placement and *not* stickers!

129  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Old Rubik's Cube book rediscovered via the Internet. I love you Internet. on: February 20, 2014, 07:37:03 AM

Haha, no!

See above, I used a really sloppy slow method. There's no way I'd be able to do that!

130  Other Software / Developer's Corner / Re: Amit Patel's Red Blob Games and Game Programming Pages on: February 19, 2014, 08:19:29 PM
Very briefly let's go into this snippet:

"In choosing a technique for AI in your games, keep it as simple as possible. If you know the answer, put the answer into the program. If you know how to compute the answer, put the algorithm for computing it into the program. "

In my view, if the "answer" is that easy, the game has failed. Simple example I'll mention is that Brokken on one of the old (SDK?) games for the (badly programmed) character Brokken was a quick "9-foot-stab" to victory, an AI would "report that". So we have some serious bad news "True Scotsman" problems with what we think "AI" is.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_true_Scotsman
Remember, all this forgets the low level robotic crap. This is algorithms.

Being a McDonalds    3rd level worker ... isn't that hard.
Being a Duanereade  3rd level worker ... isn't that hard.

We keep trying to make "AI" some kind of moving target that takes higher and higher levels of various training or intelligence or both to meet. But just spend a day with a McDonalds worker. *Maybe* they'll miss a couple of beautiful intuitive optimizations to increase sales by $88 that day, but the basic job is a snap.

It's coming.

131  Other Software / Developer's Corner / Re: Amit Patel's Red Blob Games and Game Programming Pages on: February 19, 2014, 07:30:14 PM
There's a bit of a spinoff topic here:

"With modern web browsers, there’s no need for explanations to follow the formats used in magazines, technical papers, and books. We can combine learning by reading, learning by watching, and learning by doing."

I DO believe there's a need for "magazines, technical papers, and books".  I cut that quote pretty hard - I'm not sure if he's only talking about the "comp game" industry or going broader to "learning theory".

I'm moving into the topic that the types of info in a "manual" isn't the same info-theory-wise as all the stuff he was saying. We're skipping the DeadTreePaper vs PDF discussion here. Manuals are about telling you stuff like "Oh, yeah, right, this year you have to unclick the boxes 1,7 and 14 to get this year's return to file or it won't work at all, and if you miss boxes 13 and 14 it screws the client and you have no idea why at a ten second look".

So, we need manuals. Pop articles on the web don't cover that.

132  Special User Sections / Site/Forum Features / Smiley Extra Spaces on: February 19, 2014, 07:24:11 PM

When I click a smiley, it adds an extra space. Is there a reason for this?

At the start of the line (which is where I like to put them) I have to delete the space to not have them look ugly!

 smiley (before)
Cool (After)

133  Special User Sections / Adventures of Baby Cody / Re: Baby Cody 2014! on: February 19, 2014, 07:22:16 PM
I want Baby Cody to visit NY City when tax season is done!
smiley
134  DonationCoder.com Software / Post New Requests Here / Re: For Serious Research: Cadillac of "ClipBoard Managers" vs. "Info/Data Manager" on: February 19, 2014, 07:19:47 PM
Heh that means you, Mr. Kormanik, you of the "giant unsorted data chunks". You're the thread opener! Let's play!
smiley
135  DonationCoder.com Software / Post New Requests Here / Re: For Serious Research: Cadillac of "ClipBoard Managers" vs. "Info/Data Manager" on: February 19, 2014, 07:09:09 PM
...
Instead, I've just adopted some of the basic principles, such as:

- bite-size notes (c. 200 words on ave., 500 words max. per note). One major idea per note.
- no hierarchical organisation (flat alphabetical or chronological list). I keep them in a chronological order.
- make it easy to find the notes by:
-- having descriptive (long) titles, inc. date and time note captured, author's name, year of publication, main topics
-- having categories, labels.
...

We're def. getting into personal prefs.

My answer to tags would be a bit like an Excel/clone page with extra "sort columns". So then if "shuffling data" is your thing, with a medium amount of work up front, your data can be presented hierarchically in X ways.

I'm pretty big on at least fluid hierarchy because I believe almost all data exists in *some* hierarchy. Even if you're not sure if you want to deal with it as Compounds/Molecules/Atoms or Symptom/Causes/Suspected, purely flat data just feels wrong. I think I'm hearing there's need for flexibility in organization, but not all notes are created equal! So even if you "tagged" three different sort methods, it's like in Excel "sort by Column G, or F, or B".

And for Note size, I haven't done word counts (though I'm almost the type to do that!!), but I'm a "Completeness Maven". Short notes bother me because they tend to feel they are not complete. The only unclear part is whether it should all go into one big note (length) or subnotes (structure). So I def. see some style prefs going on!

As a friendly comment, I'm barely able to even imagine how you deal with stuff without either longer notes or structuring! Someone please give me a PM example of a minor-mini data-set for chatting! I basically can't even handle 500 words before it becomes a tree! But ya know, this might be because I merge "Getting Things Done" (GTD) themes into my notes.

So holler at me!

Cheers,

--Tao



136  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Old Rubik's Cube book rediscovered via the Internet. I love you Internet. on: February 19, 2014, 06:54:26 PM
...
So, after all that, why I have troubled you with this little tale?

It's taken 30 years to pass for me to find that book, a genuinely special book that must have influenced the person I became (I hated school and studying so I didn't read any books as a child, yet I persevered with that one). I could have searched for the book sooner, I could have tried to work out where I was going wrong with my cube solution sooner. It didn't matter until now.

I'll see you James Nourse and raise you!

This next bit will sound "snarky" but I mean it in a blended "humanistic-technical sense"! So try not to get upset!

If you had "wanted to" find that book, you could have found it 10-15 years ago and maybe 20 years ago. But you "didn't try very hard" aka "thinking laterally", so you "accepted" that it took you this long for slow nostalgia to kick in and you eventually succeeded.

I know, allowing for better engines, watch this:
Yahoo search (aka Bing, "second rate" not even Google!) Rubik's Cube Solution books 1981
Bang. First result:

The Simple Solution to Rubik's Cube by James G. Nourse 1981 ...
www.ebay.com/ctg/Simple-Solution-Rubiks-Cube-James-G...   Cached
The Simple Solution to Rubik's Cube by James G. Nourse (1981, Paperback) : James G. Nourse (1981)

Even Back in 1998 it might not have been First Result, but only about eight books about the Rubik's Cube appeared before about 1983, and then you just check them.

"That Was Easy". (Staples)

I'll raise you "Phoenix".

Turns out, after many scattered weeks of research over twenty years, the "Phoenix" (Western version) is way at the top of the list of myths with "exactly three words". Birdy. Reborn. Flames. And then suddenly you discover no one else knows ANYTHING.

But the story I read 30 years ago was a take on the myth that gave me my handle. Brilliantly done. Go on, try to find it. Children's Book. Phoenix. Go on, try to search THAT!

You'll get crappy results about Phoenix Arizona, Phoenix Suns teams, and seven other businesses.

Lemme save you the misery.

One random day through a once-a-decade bit of inspiration, I found a (now forgotten) search path that pulled it in. By beautiful pure chance, a fresh new copy was made in the "search era". Cleaned up, see below.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_and_the_Phoenix
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Ormondroyd

Look at that last name. *Completely* unmemorable. And this was a book I'd read as a child about age 10. (Unknown if it was the 1957 or 1981 edition but it felt quasi old, even chances being the 1957 copy.)

Heh - so I bought three copies for Old Times sake.

So here's to Nostalgia books!

smiley

137  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: When you make your 100'th Post on: February 19, 2014, 06:37:22 PM
Tomos missed my 2100th post, a few days ago, so I'll put it here myself cheesy
 (see attachment in previous post)

Heh well I didn't think this was solely on Tomos! I'm amused you both saw it yourself and photoshopped kept a copy!

I'm as Number-Happy as it gets, but I just haven't been looking in this vein for a while!

138  Special User Sections / The Getting Organized Experiment of 2009 / Re: Warning: Time is the single biggest cause of stress in our western culture on: February 19, 2014, 06:35:36 PM
Heh Necro Thread Arise!

But we're here, so I'll just add that "Time" is also one of the X concepts that makes basic civilization work. If for example you are dealing with an entity that has no concept of "time", it ruins your basic life efficiency!
(Examples include ditzy artsy friends, and "Please Hold (for 82 minutes), your call is important to us." (But not enough to staff the line better!!)

139  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Old Rubik's Cube book rediscovered via the Internet. I love you Internet. on: February 19, 2014, 06:20:13 PM
Misc notes:

- Long after that college hobby, I had no use for the cube for a decade. But I like "projects of the week/month" and a couple of different times in homage to the nostalgia I checked up on the evolving theory of the speedcubing world a few years ago.

- The Cube really was prone to a bit of "Sequel-itis" more often seen in movie theory. The Cube is stunningly brilliant. See this snip from the Wiki page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubik%27s_Cube
"In the mid-1970s, Ernő Rubik worked at the Department of Interior Design at the Academy of Applied Arts and Crafts in Budapest.[12] Although it is widely reported that the Cube was built as a teaching tool to help his students understand 3D objects, his actual purpose was solving the structural problem of moving the parts independently without the entire mechanism falling apart. He did not realize that he had created a puzzle until the first time he scrambled his new Cube and then tried to restore it.[13]"

Heh Oops... total "What Have I Done" moment! So, brilliance part 1 is that it was a structural study in a professional environment!

- The complete set of "basic" solving concepts really is pretty tough to get "cold out of the gate". See my note above - "Any dedicated child can get the first two rows", but then that last 80-20 conceptual wall kicks in and you get hosed. (By "Basic" I even mean the current speed-cubing practice. See below.)

- The cube still holds important study material for professional mathematicians dealing with combinatorial-informational theories etc.

Whew!

Unfortunately, his later projects rapidly went downhill.
- Rubik's Magic has a stunning "technology concept" in the link pattern of the vinyl fibers, but the actual solution is pretty rudimentary.
- Rubik's Clock was even more basic. Even lil' ol' me in *high school* figured that out and I even created a term paper enabling my English teacher to solve it.

(Spoiler: Rubik's Clock is two sided, has mechanical wheels, and each wheel moves two sets of four clocks out of two sets of nine laid out in a three-by-three pattern on each side. The innermost clock moved by all four mechanical wheels on the object is the center clock. 9 clocks. Move 4 at a time. The middle one is the common linked data-point. Go on, take a beer, fiddle with it for an hour just to see the movement, and then the solution comes to you. Your "One minute advice" clue is that it's really similar to Algebra's isolating down to one variable in a multi set of equations and then you fill in bit by bit. In Rubik's Clock, you can do it intuitively. Come on, 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 9. Even. Odd. Right.

Yes, it really is as simple as you think it is.)

140  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Old Rubik's Cube book rediscovered via the Internet. I love you Internet. on: February 19, 2014, 06:01:22 PM
Wow that brings back memories!

The first time I saw that book was a couple weeks after the first time I saw a Rubik's Cube. A friend bought one and then spent 2 weeks trying to solve it before giving up and buying the book. He was pissed when he figured out he had gotten within about a dozen moves on his own.

Heh depends on "Which Dozen"!

That method in the Nourse book is interesting as a semi IQ-test. Provided it is "an important goal" (to prevent things like my brand of laziness!), "any bright person (including child sub-prodigies!)" can do the top row as long as they get the concept of the difference between a "color" and "cube placement". I'll leave it for another day about what it takes to discover that "on your own". But kinda like "free advice" from a business, even if you didn't get that concept because you were stuck on a blind alley, a five minute explanation is enough and then the Bright Person *can* work out the easy combos but it's far from giving the show away.

A "Dedicated" bright person can get the middle row. The moves to do that are slightly longer, but still pretty easy relatively. Only a genius would see it "pure" and do it right the first time instantly, but good intuition and some fiddling for "moderate" lengths of time should be enough.

It's that last row that's the real cruncher. I could not possibly have gotten any of the move sets required. And I don't care to spend eleven hours diagramming that last 30 mover!
ohmy

I think I recall Mr. Nourse said he only got the last bit of inspiration because his day job was as a chemist and he was used to large interactions of swirling elements.

141  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Old Rubik's Cube book rediscovered via the Internet. I love you Internet. on: February 19, 2014, 02:52:47 PM
Haha! This is a fun topic for me! Here's Nudone's note, ((With some insertions for comic effect!)) and then my own afterward.

I learnt to solve the Rubik's Cube during the ((third)) craze by reading this book: The Simple Solution to Rubik's Cube by James G. Nourse.

It was ((1996)), I was ((20)) years old, bored out of my brain ((procrastinating studying college classes)).

((Immediately)) after, I forgot a few of the algorithm solutions ((because I was lazy!!)) but would muddle through with what I could remember and still solve the cube, albeit taking longer than necessary ((But five minutes was fast enough in 4-hour dorm hang-outs)). I couldn't ((be bothered to learn)) the correct algorithms ((Because seven can solve the cube in those five minutes but it jumps to like 20 to get your time down to three minutes)). ((I have since lost the book in the mists of time.))

So, I spent ((2)) years ((during college)) solving the cube with my messed up method. Knowing that it ((is as bastardized as possible while still working!!))  but also knowing that it would always work - eventually. (There's a moral in there somewhere. ((Yes - Sometimes it's possible to get by with the smaller things in life by just being lazy. Like not doing dishes.- Tao))

...Speedsolving the Cube by Dan Harris. ((During one month being bored at work I looked up the current theory of speedsolving about 2010. I didn't know Dan Harris had written a book.))

...I already had my own method, I haven't the time nor patience to learn a new method; ((and the Rubik's Cube is old-hat enough  that it just wasn't wasting my already feeble memory on for me.)) ...

It didn't take long to realise when and why I should use some of the half remembered algorithms, they were quite obvious in the end.

((I disagree. The key of the Nourse book is that the last algorithm is it's 30 moves long but it "Just Works" in the Apple sense. ))

Now, the sense of knowing exactly how to approach a particular pattern with a specific algorithm is very satisfying. ((No, it's not, for me. I like the 30 mover at the end because it's muscle memory and it Just Works. But there's the spot in the middle with a set of about eight patterns that actually takes work to memorize and that's the part I skipped because its only use was speed, not being essential.))

But, I knew that I didn't have the complete method for my solution - I could remember the book demonstrating more algorithms than I used; or that is what my faded memory told me - who can say what was in a book that you've not seen for 30 years.

((I DO remember exactly what is in it, 18 years later. The first chapter is about the top row, and he doesn't care "how you do it" because his point is solving the cube is not about "the top is blue", but the "blue-yellow cube can ONLY go on the intersection of those two sides. So once you get it there it just stays there. And all the moves are about you retain the progress you made at each step, barring blunders.

So the top row is a snap because you can let the entire rest of the cube go to hell to save time.

Then there's the middle row, and you just put the cubes where they belong one at a time, and the move is pretty easy.

The fun is that for the bottom row, that method's concept is it retains the progress you already have made. But now there's less "entropy" to waste, so the moves suddenly get WAY harder. See my comment about the 30 mover - it's because it has to switch EXACTLY two cubes with no room to spare. But it "Just Works". The step *before* that is the one  you're supposed to look at the series of eight/whatever configurations and pick *which one* of the eight patterns to use - BLEH!! But if you just learn two of the eight they're cyclical so if you "don't mind wasting time" it just rotates through the configurations so you just do the move three times in a row and then it works out. ))

Last night, I decided to try and find the method used in the book. I knew it was an unpopular method, cube solving has progressed over the years, but I thought that after a lot of searching online I'd find some mention of this outdated solution.

((It's unpopular because it's absolutely de-optimized for speed solving - it's designed to lock in your progress so you can't lose it at any time, barring blunders. The problem with the speed methods is you get those "decision points" where if you DO learn the 138 patterns, your time rockets down from that lazy five minutes to forty five seconds. ))


Whee! Does that help?
Cool
142  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Processing Delays!? on: February 18, 2014, 08:25:43 PM
This drives me bonkers.  It started happening on an XP install of mine and I could never find a way to identify what was causing it or to fix it.

I think the fact that it doesn't show up in the Task Manager cpu suggested that it is a low level system driver of some sort.

However, I strongly suspected it was caused by ESet antivirus/firewall  the fact that it was happening always during disk access was one clue.


I don't *think* I have Eset active (what even is that? It sounds vaguely familiar to something I thought I nuked a while back) - but it's popped up a few times. How can a stall not be processed by Task Manager?! ( I might have screwed up these quotes.)

143  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: The Best Security Suites (2013/2014) on: February 18, 2014, 08:22:49 PM
...
For the last week I've been trialing AVG internet security.  I tried a dozen others but AVG was the one that I found least offensive.  I might try outpost again, as I always liked Outpost, but right now AVG is doing pretty well by me.

I did not install the optional stuff like web browsing guards, identity guards, etc. -- and thankfully those are optional installs.  Those seem too likely to cause problems and slowdowns to me.

AVG does *not* offer the kind of fine granularity control of the powerful firewalls like Eset and Outpost, but it does offer more control and transparency than some of the truly minimal ones.  But my patience for micro-managing firewall access control rules has diminished over the years, so that's not bothering me as much as it would have in the past.

In terms of basic antivirus and firewall, i'm not unhappy with AVG, and the system performance and stability seem really excellent, which is my main concern these days.

Wow Mouser, you demigod of DC you, how does all this compare to the entry conspicuously absent from these ratings, aka MS Internet Essentials!?

Heh So if that's my "C" (3rd hand suggested) program, how are your A and B programs worth it and better?
144  DonationCoder.com Software / Post New Requests Here / Re: For Serious Research: Cadillac of "ClipBoard Managers" vs. "Info/Data Manager" on: February 18, 2014, 08:16:58 PM
Looks like an interesting system, especially for complex issues, scientific books, and journal articles. Could you recommend some readings on the topic?

It was this article by Manfred Kuehn that got me started: Some Idiosyncratic Reflections on Note-Taking in General
and ConnectedText in Particular


He blogs frequently about Zettelkasten.

Christian Tietze's blog posts on the matter are also helpful.

And here is the original Luhmann article: Communicating with Slip Boxes: An Empirical Account

These are some power articles.

But maybe there's "theory" that goes down-level as well as up-level.

I like MyInfo as one of Four Two One winner app that just lets me smash out info. I'm "just a customer" aka no hidden agendas, but as a User I spent over a year and over twenty programs came up short.

Per these articles, years ago I got fascinated by that kind of high level theory. But if the "Implementation" has a fatal flaw, in real life you lose months of your productive life. (Speaking from experience!)

(Your choice of who) have taken smaller goals and implemented them well. In Data Mgt to me that's huge - do a smaller subset tightly and maybe I can work around my edge case, than get too big and have the whole thing implode.

145  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Processing Delays!? on: February 18, 2014, 08:06:24 PM

A few times I have noticed that certain apps pause while doing something, while Task Manager "swears nothing is going on".

Does anyone know of a tool that covers this?

Just now I loaded a couple of programs and got stalled, but Task Manager was indicating cpu activity near 10% or less etc.

I'm on XP, it happens at work on Vista too.

How can a program delay and Task Manager not know about it?!
146  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: What the Heck is Happening to Windows? Article on Windows 8 Disaster on: February 17, 2014, 08:10:55 PM
...
To be fair even the ones coping quite well with using it want rid because it just annoys them all the time. If your main use of a computer is Word, Excel and Outlook what exactly is the point of the not-Metro interface.

And lets face it the ONLY reason for the new interface is to push the app store (which like Apple and Google stores is full of crap and scumware) - it doesn't really add much else to Windows of use. The apps are pretty lacking in most people's opinion. Haven't looked recently but is there a Facebook RT app yet - there wasn't for a hell of a long time!!

Have to say I use Android a lot and I am becoming increasingly disillusioned with that too - I hate all the functionally crippled apps - eg. the GMail is pretty annoying compared to the web interface allowing virtually no convenient ways to actually manage your email (yes you can read and write emails but everything else is clunky) - Android Mail app by comparison is in the stone age.

Facebook apps on Android and the Apple eco-system are all pretty terrible compared to the full browser based version - there is just so much you can't do!! Hell you have to have a separate app to manage pages (which is even more limited in functionality than the main app) and if you manage a FB group most of the settings are missing in the mobile apps.

For all these companies this is all just about money ... none of them give a toss about what customers/users actually want or need.

I'm actually kinda surprised that for twenty years even fourth rate desktop programs do more than most of the truly awful apps in those stores. It's almost an ironic reversal of what the "cold hard cash economy" of the apps were supposed to do! And the proportionate space used by iAd or whatever it's called is apalling - maybe 15% of the screen space!

Heh xkcd nailed it a little while back.
http://xkcd.com/1174/

147  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: What the Heck is Happening to Windows? Article on Windows 8 Disaster on: February 17, 2014, 12:11:01 PM
Personally, this reminds of when Windows XP first hit the streets and everybody swore up and down that it was a terrible, no-good OS with a horrible "kindergarten GUI". Look at it now, we can't get rid of the friggin OS. I, for one, enjoy the metro start screen (although I boot to desktop). The start screen is actually fairly intuitive and allows me to hide unnecessary clutter caused by menu after menu of new program folders. Heck, I never used the all programs menu in vista/7 with the type to search feature.

Well, way back then they were kinda right - XP didn't get really stable until about Service Pack 3. And it is pretty easy to "theme away" the "Kindergarten" look.
148  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: What the Heck is Happening to Windows? Article on Windows 8 Disaster on: February 17, 2014, 11:36:23 AM
...
@Tao - you could just save time and load Win7 today and be done with it.

Seriously, how much more does anybody really need an OS to do that isn't already being handled (quite well) by Windows 7. Or Linux Mint 16 too for that matter - if you don't need specific Windows apps.

Mint is my goto productivity environment. And I also keep a Win 7 environment for those times when my own needs dictate it must be used. That's my current path. Get something that works today - that will still be supported for the reasonably foreseeable future - and not waste time trying to second guess what Microsoft will eventually do. First, because the thrill is gone. And secondly, because that way madness lies.

Hmm, a couple of points here -
First, I do indeed need Windows apps, everything from DC stuff here to MyInfo and more.

But part of it all was conceptual. Win 7 will "always be there" as an option. But first, I recall seeing MS's new support policy being about "only supporting two editions back". So if they follow that aggressively, then we'll see the same drop in support for Win 7 in a couple of years that we now see for XP.

But also I really do want to see what they officially decide for Win 9 from the conceptual point. Metro/etc is "baked" pretty hard into Win 8. And Win 9 will be the first new edition of Windows with that new CEO at the helm, without Steve Ballmer or Steve Sinofsky. And it will indeed be the close of that ten year plan when I built my project machine to purposely wait out the intervening years' worth of bad decisions by MS. So maybe the "thrill" is gone but I really do feel that Win 9 will be important as "the Post Win-8 World".

Meanwhile Paul Thurott is a Microsoft "Apologist", so when he decides to say something against MS, it usually means other people have been saying it first. Meanwhile his conclusion that Win 9 should "focus on productivity" is a lot of what I was saying elsewhere above about "lean and mean".
149  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: What the Heck is Happening to Windows? Article on Windows 8 Disaster on: February 16, 2014, 04:04:04 PM
We then saw 1-2 (depending how MS counts them for support rules purposes) Win 8 and 8.1 releases. Yuck.

Have you actually used Windows 8 and 8.1...

Nope. Not used them. According to my design theory specs, I wanna see what that ex-engineer new CEO cooks up for Win 9 or even 9.1.

That skips Vista, 7 (tempting), 8, 8.1, and I'm banking hard that 9.1 might be the new Go To OS for Microsoft.

That's my path.

150  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Security breach at Kickstarter on: February 16, 2014, 09:54:44 AM
Not really.  Yes, name and address are valuable information for scammers, but only in combination with other things- and there are easier ways to get those than breaching a website.

Maybe but the disclosure included five items - Usernames, emails, mail addresses, phone numbers, and encrypted passwords.

That's a good haul, on the order of "it only takes three more things" to ruin someone.

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