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1  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: which phone? on: December 10, 2014, 02:55:04 PM
You may want to check out this.

You'll have to update your other post, Nokia have just released Here android into a more open beta, (used to have to download from Nokia).

https://play.google.com/s...ails?id=com.here.app.maps

Awesomissimo. Yeah, I'll use it in Italy. smiley
2  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: which phone? on: December 10, 2014, 10:17:25 AM
You may want to check out this.
3  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Spoilers Are Fun !! on: December 09, 2014, 11:52:28 AM
my info:  Windows Vista   Home Premium-SP2   Intel Core 2 Duo CPU    T6400 @ 2.00GHz    4GB RAM    64-bit        Windows Internet Explorer 9

Any suggestions are welcome.   smiley

Actually anything would be welcome after that smiley
4  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 28, 2014, 08:22:04 AM
It will probably first require a major shift in attitude on the part of the creators and consumers. That and some management of expectations by both sides before anything lasting gets accomplished on that front. Right now both sides feel hurt and angry and are constantly doubling down and getting more and more ridiculous with their claims and arguments.

I couldn't describe the existing picture better.
5  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 28, 2014, 07:40:40 AM
Question: How do you break the current framework without sacrificing the creators in the process? The interest groups and corps are the last to get hurt in this sort of battle. The people that make the product are the first to get put on the block or thrown to the wolves. This isn't meant as a comeback. I really am curious how that might be accomplished with minimal casualties to the creatives.

Well, that's the one I have yet to figure out a good answer for.

The best I have so far is to go back to the creative compensation system which was in place before the royalty system (i.e. how Spinoza, Mozart or Shakespeare paid their bills). But it's not practical for immediate application, and would disrupt the economic system to an extent to cause unbearable hardship to millions. And you would never see products such as Pixar movies in the lone-wolf creative system I preach. So it would take away certain things we are used to and like.

Therefore, I'm always all ears for better solutions. But making creations "property" is not the way to go from my political perspective. I can say that.

What would you suggest to reform the existing intellectual creativity compensation regime, if you think we have to?
6  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 28, 2014, 06:48:27 AM
Today IP is abused to skew the distribution of wealth. Its primary purpose is to make commodities out of thoughts and ideas, so that capital can buy them, and subsequently sell them to consumers at a substantial profit. The "compensating artists" point is no longer relevant, for most, albeit not all, of them earn their living by appearing on events and shows, rather than through royalties.

From this thoroughly political perspective, my conscience is free with respect to downloading things released by billion dollar firms.
For shareware released directly by the programmer, however, I check out the trial version. If I like it, I write to the programmer and tell them $39.99 is a lot of money here in Turkey, and I'd be really happy if they would give me a discount. They often do. Regardless of the discount, in the end I buy the software.

So, to answer your question:
I'd not act against the will of an ordinary natural person who thinks he/she is better off charging for the software. I'd pay for it, or not use it.
The legal persons with the clout (and the will) to shape the laws through lobbying, regulatory capture etc. are fair game to screw however. Because they screw me anytime they get the chance to do so.
But in practice, (nowadays) I rarely bother to pirate their products as well, for I have free alternatives. Why bother cracking ms office, when libre would do?
7  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 28, 2014, 05:58:25 AM
^Apologies. I added a question to my previous post but hit the save key by mistake before I got it in. I' d be interested in your answer.

This will sound like avoiding the question, but I never saw myself as one to write commercial software. So I may be ignorant of some aspects of life as a commercial software programmer.

I could write free (as in beer, as well as as in FSF) software if I were good at it (and I'm not). Perhaps I could ask for a donation if users liked it.

The closest personal comparison I can see myself in with respect to your question is this: I have a blog. If someone took something I wrote, and published it without due reference, and even charged for my articles... I probably wouldn't mind. But as I said, I'm not making a normative judgment here. I'm not in a position to impose my ethics to others. And god forbid if I ever be in a position to impose. That would be unethical tongue
8  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 28, 2014, 05:33:42 AM
Nope. I'm not creating anything for me. Writers may write. Or they may not. It's at their discretion. I'm not entitled to anything. I can't demand them to write.

If they want their ideas to be adopted by wider masses, it's in their best interest to write. But if they don't, that's fine by me as well.
9  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 28, 2014, 03:25:38 AM
What IP does is create the opportunity for "walk-away income" which is saying it allows someone to separate income from hours.

A popular lecturer has only so many hours in a year in which he/he can make money lecturing. And so many venues in which to do it.

Record the seminar on a video, and the money earned is not directly linked to the lecturer's presence. And the venue becomes what is most convenient to the listener. No need to run out somewhere to hear something you want to hear. You can put in on when and where you wish - and listen to it as many times as you want. Big benefit to the listener that's not possible otherwise.

Well, this is a creative rewriting of the history. It is obvious that IP was not invented to let lecturers broadcast over paid youtube channels. You might wanna check this out for a more accurate (methinks) version of the history of copyright.

Put the same information in a book and it has the potential to reach millions and doesn't require sophisticated technology to access it. Big benefit for the less financially well off - or those in less advanced environments - yet still retains the benefits of the recorded seminar.

Publish electronically and the buyer gets all of the above plus the convenience of instant access. Benefit again.

So put them in a book, video, mp3, whatever. Pirates don't hinder your ability to publish. They may hinder publication as a commercial venture, but not publication per se.

Pirate any of the above and the lecturer gets zero for all the additional benefits provided. His/her income opportunities are reduced to what can be made by doing a live presentation. Their income once again becomes tied to physical hours. Furthermore, the pirated copies have the potential to reduce what might have otherwise been a valuable product to a commodity. Why pay for it at all when you can get it for free?

Basically, the creator of intellectual property is once again reduced to swapping hours of lifetime for dollars on a one-to-one basis. Which serves to put an absolute cap on one's earning potential even under the most ideal set of circumstances.

But it gets worse. With the commoditization of IP something else bad happens. Piracy serves to drive out professionals. Because once you can no longer make a living, the only people that can afford to pursue an activity are the wealthy and the amateurs.

Well... you consider writing (and comparable activities) as a source of income, a way to earn living. I consider them an outburst of creativity, some goal in and of itself. Again, historically, writers were not entitled to anything just because they wrote. They received some benefits, often indirectly, such as the theater proceeds Shakespeare received. But he knew from the start that writing alone would not create any rights for him.

Consider Spinoza. He was a great philosopher who laid the foundations of the Enlightenment. He thought, and he wrote. Not to earn a living, but because he felt he had to. Man he was awesome. Yet he knew writing was not something to create a living for him. Instead he worked as an optical lens manufacturer. If working as a full-time lens manufacturer did not prevent laying the foundations of the Enlightenment, I believe today's writers will also do fine working as a nurse, waiter, carpenter, programmer, whatever.

If you look at literature prior to the 20th century, writing was the playground of the wealthy and privileged. And the books reflected the interests and biases of those who wrote them. Books were written by "the establishment" and preached establishment politics and mores. It wasn't until independent publishers started making inexpensive books and pamphlets (and paying authors) that differing viewpoints got more broadly into circulation - sometimes with disruptive ideas that reshaped the societies themselves.

Well... to think of it... It makes sense... Marx wrote what he did to earn royalties didn't he?
Anyway check out publication statistics comparing pre- and post- extended copyright regime.

Pirating IP isn't liberating. It does little more than reduce people that create IP to an hourly wage since it destroys the opportunity for walk-away income. Which on turn puts a cap on creative earnings. Which eventually kills off professionalism and gives the stage to the amateurs and the idle. Because why would anybody with an ounce of brains want to go through all the trouble of being creative when they could just get a job doing something a lot easier. And likely for the same (or more) money?

Again refer to the Spinoza paragraph.
 
Pirating is a game changer. But not in the way some people think. What it mostly does is switch the formula for who is doing the screwing. It used to be the studios and record labels who were ripping off the talent. Now it's their fans.

Why do you create an entitlement on part of the writers in the first place? They were not entitled to anything in the 17th century, and virtually anything prior to 1920s. Yet they did write. Somewhere in the 20th century, we invented this entitlement idea. And now they constantly feel the fear of being screwed.

What IP ultimately does is to make thoughts commodities, which can be bought by the wealthy, and then used to further their interests.

If I may put words in the mouth of an actor known for 1950s westerns, IP is not the solution to our problems. IP is the problem.
And piracy is a symptom of this problem, an irrelevant and mostly useless practice in my humble opinion.

ed.: typo fixes
10  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 27, 2014, 05:27:17 AM
Piracy is theft, pretty simple and pretty much illegal everywhere - your non-copyright countries included.

Oh no not again the implicit loading.

Piracy = copyright infringement <> theft.
As in piracy <> murder, or piracy <> battery, or piracy <> oral sex.

Different terms have different meanings for a reason. If we are to use just one regardless of differences, there's no need for so many. Think about it, why are there different words for crime, felony, misdemeanor etc.? Because they refer to somewhat similar albeit essentially different concepts.

Theft is a case where the thief deprives the victim, of something.
Copyright infringement does not necessarily lead to deprivation.
11  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 26, 2014, 06:57:17 PM
I say we keelhaul 'em all!  Cool

What did you expect? They are the grandsons of criminals exiled to down under. I say burn them all. But only after we pile stakes through them.
12  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Thoughts on "Piracy". on: November 24, 2014, 12:24:55 AM
The current state of IP is such a complete disaster that there's really nothing that can be done other than to tear the whole thing down.

Should people be compensated for creating things? Sure.

Who should compensate them? The people that use/consume the creation.

But that's not what happens now, even without piracy. The MAFIAA taxes blank media. That's not just compensation because it steals from people who aren't consuming MAFIAA creations.

One. Big. Mess.

Burn it down.

Today IP is abused to skew the distribution of wealth. Its primary purpose is to make commodities out of thoughts and ideas, so that capital can buy them, and subsequently sell them to consumers at a substantial profit. The "compensating artists" point is no longer relevant, for most, albeit not all, of them earn their living by appearing on events and shows, rather than through royalties.

From this thoroughly political perspective, my conscience is free with respect to downloading things released by billion dollar firms.
For shareware released directly by the programmer, however, I check out the trial version. If I like it, I write to the programmer and tell them $39.99 is a lot of money here in Turkey, and I'd be really happy if they would give me a discount. They often do. Regardless of the discount, in the end I buy the software.
13  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Firefox windows and CPU slow-downs and restarts on: November 18, 2014, 08:59:26 AM
Really, truly, sincerely... Firefox ESR.
14  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Firefox windows and CPU slow-downs and restarts on: November 18, 2014, 05:37:44 AM
Really, stay on Firefox ESR.

We're no longer 20-somethings, let someone else be the beta tester. You (I mean me) have less time remaining to spend on this planet, and troubleshooting a new version of web browser every 6 weeks or so is not something I intend to do.

ed.: "the" use for non-native speakers.
15  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Please recommend a Canadian domain name registrar to me on: November 15, 2014, 06:56:09 AM
The United States Marshals Service had my blog taken down today. (I have it back up now.) My registrar is in the US, but my hosting provider is in Canada. I want to ditch everything to do with the US and get all my domains into Canada. (I ditched my server in Texas to host with a Canadian company in Canada.)

What was your blog about?
16  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Please recommend a Canadian domain name registrar to me on: November 15, 2014, 01:54:24 AM
I no longer trust US based ones, after so many domain name seizures by captured US government agencies such as ICE. Not that I have anything illegal on my domains (mom's recipes site, wifey's company's site etc.), but a government should not be able to seize a domain name without court orders. US govt does that.

So my motive is political.
17  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Please recommend a Canadian domain name registrar to me on: November 15, 2014, 01:31:22 AM
I use easydns. A bit more expensive than namecheap, but it's based in Canada. It is highly recommended by techdirt.
18  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: 32bit vs 64bit question on: November 11, 2014, 06:49:16 PM
...
No other practical difference.

Forgive a Turbo-Newb butting where he doesn't belong, but I think it makes a TON of "practical" difference!!

When you change a "bit" addressing amount, you unlock things that weren't possible before. Lots of examples. Discuss.

I say none, you say lots. I believe the onus lies with you, rather than me, for non-existence is a tad harder to prove than proving existence. See the debate on agnosticism.

I really think the only practical difference for 4.99 percent of the population is the address space limit. There maybe a few others for the 0.01 percent, that I am not aware of, and that you will hopefully name. For 95 percent, no difference whatsoever between 32 and 64 bits.

ed.: removed a "the". I will never master these things.
19  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: 32bit vs 64bit question on: November 11, 2014, 05:58:30 PM
Nope, the bit count refers to the width of the memory addressing system. So pretty much the only difference is that 32 bit systems can address a memory space of 2^32 bits, while 64 bits can address 2^64.

So 64 bits allows you use programs which require much more memory. Think about photoshopping a 10m(eter) x 2 m banner for instance.

No other practical difference.
20  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: location triggers for android on: November 03, 2014, 03:35:46 PM
Tasker does that.
21  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Firefox windows and CPU slow-downs and restarts on: October 31, 2014, 04:51:07 AM
When I started using Firefox regularly a few years ago I did find it slowed down and would crash when I had a lot of tabs open.  Over time it has improved.  But I noticed a real speed improvement when I installed extensions "Ad Block Plus" and "Do Not Track Me" - I think the reason is that Ads and tracking are loaded and take time and memory.  I use Session Manger and was using TabGroups Manager - would sometimes get up to 500 tabs open and I did not feel it slow down - I do have 16GB of memory and an i7 processor.  Now did it crash occasionally - yes and that is why to use Session Manger and save backups regularly.  I do push the number limit it seems with tabs.  Recently my Firefox crashed and would not open so I created a new profile and reloaded my extensions and am now trying Tab Mix Plus.  I do find the need to group is necessary.  TabGroups Manager is good I like that it gives a number count for each tab group and Tab Mix Plus does not.  Tab Mix Plus gives a lot more control over tab and toolbar appearance also.  open tab count widget gives a total count of tabs open.  Caution - you may have some trouble, like me, playing audio or video sometimes - if I trust the site I will unblock it in Do Not Track Me, sometimes I have to copy the url and open it in another browser that is not blocking.

Using paragraphs can also help tongue

Anyway, I also agree with you, that adblocking helps with memory consumption.
22  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Firefox windows and CPU slow-downs and restarts on: October 23, 2014, 12:32:05 PM
Don't underestimate the power of casting off gmail to another browser. It really helps.
23  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Firefox windows and CPU slow-downs and restarts on: October 23, 2014, 12:09:42 PM
Don't use any unnecessary add-ons.
Use flashblock (or firefox's built-in function).
Restart firefox. Restart early, restart often. This may help.
Last but not least, don't use ajax-heavy sites (i.e. gmail) on firefox. Use a dedicated browser such as IE for them.
24  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Chip Wars: AMD vs Intel .... GO! on: October 22, 2014, 11:20:24 PM
I think the only one I was really happy with was the AMD 5200+ Dual Core.  That machine ran smooth and quiet.  It performed fairly well considering it only had 2 GB ram.  But it had one of those crippled Intel on the motherboard video chips with only 8 MB ram on the chip.

How on earth were you able to run an AMD cpu on Intel chipset?
25  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: when will we eventually be able to on: October 20, 2014, 12:07:43 PM
Have you heard of this new invention called the wheel?

oh we don't have it here in UK
where are you based? do you have it?

I'm in Turkey, and all major fuel distributors offer systems like these. Most firms and fleets buy fuel for their cars using systems like these. You can track almost everything and set any limits. I use an equivalent system from another brand, but couldn't find an english language site for it, so you have shell's instead.
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