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1  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: How is youtube tracking me? on: April 14, 2014, 01:56:19 PM
The solution I found: move to outlook.com and f.ck with gmail.

I believe I'm entitled to employ profane words. Lots of them... Lots and lots...

Microsoft cans free custom domain support in Outlook
2  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: How is youtube tracking me? on: April 11, 2014, 07:21:47 PM
Google and its evil policy of integrating everything to a single account makes deleting cookies a pain. I have to have gmail open at all times. If I delete the cookie for google.com, gmail logs me out.

The solution I found: move to outlook.com and f.ck with gmail.
3  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: How is youtube tracking me? on: April 11, 2014, 12:10:53 AM
On a slightly related note;

I'm thoroughly fed up with Google's attempts to enroll me in google+ and to track anything and everything I search/watch.

Aside from the privacy issues, this reduces the quality of suggestions. I already watched 23 collegehumor videos, show me something else so I can discover new things. But no, Google thinks that I love only collegehumor videos, so only they show up in suggestions.

Blocking cookies is not a perfect solution, for you can't disable safe search when the cookies are blocked. Suffice it to say, I am no longer 8 years old. If I search for Stoya, I really want to see her naked.

Ergo... I move more and more of my searches to duckduckgo (which is unfortunately still sub-par on the results front), and next week I'll move to outlook.com as my e-mail provider. I have my own domain, so there should be no problems caused by e-mail address changes.
4  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: How is youtube tracking me? on: April 10, 2014, 10:56:18 AM
block cookies for *youtube.com and *google.com
cookies are evil. Google is devil incarnate.
5  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: unattended large file copies that will not prompt for msg on: March 03, 2014, 05:26:36 AM
Supercopier can be configured to have defaults as you need.
So should be Teracopy, but I didn't try the second one.
6  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: My pop/imap Android experience on: February 25, 2014, 12:19:43 PM
gmail's imap thingie is a pain in the soft tissue.


I access my GMail via IMAP using K9, Thunderbird installed on my desktop, and occasionally a PortableApps version of Thunderbird from a thumb drive. I've never had problems getting it to work with any of them.

In the same vein, my .ss works without significant problems, but it sometimes gives me pain. Particularly after eating lots of beans.

Imap@gmail has too much room for improvement in ease of use and configuration on various devices. Good luck making it work on your dad's windows phone, by giving him directions over the phone.
7  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: My pop/imap Android experience on: February 25, 2014, 10:30:52 AM
gmail's imap thingie is a pain in the soft tissue. I use pop3 instead, but use the "recent" trick to make it work with multiple devices.

enter your user name as follows:
recent:eleman@gmail.com

https://support.google.com/mail/answer/47948?hl=en
This is handy.
8  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Project Christine - Modular PC from Razer on: February 11, 2014, 02:21:43 AM
uhh... PC as we know it is already a modular architecture.

This one's defining characteristic is sexiness, not modularity smiley
9  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anyone here use Bitcoins? on: January 24, 2014, 07:22:37 AM
Well, I'd also raise the same argument against the dollar, or peso, or lira, or euro, whatever, if it did needlessly contribute to global warming. Sure they do (dead trees), but not at the scale applicable to bitcoin mining I reckon.

But they do.  Maybe not as directly... but they do.  It's *all* digital these days, truth be told.  The paper money that we hold is just a representation of digital systems in place, especially in this day and age of fractional reserve banking, quantitative easing, and creative accounting.

But they don't require otherwise useless consumption of cpu cycles, do they? They consume only what is necessary for the transactions. Sending 1000 bytes there, saving 300 bytes here. No otherwise useless effort is involved, just to make them artificially precious.

You keep harping on how gold has intrinsic value based on the shine, i.e. from your last post:

I wouldn't discount the shine as a source of value. Value is defined as the likelihood to get something else in return. I could imagine shiny rocks buying services to some caveman in a cave bordello. In other words you could use it in barter, even before the invention of money. I can't imagine that for random strings of numbers.

But now you've gotten yourself in a logical hole.  Just because you can't imagine cryptographic strings being worth much- apparently many others can.  And as such, by your definition, doesn't that give it 'intrinsic value'?  After all, people want it, right?

You're deliberately missing the point. I claim that gold has a value regardless of the assumption of it being a medium of exchange. Bitcoin hashes do not have that VALUE REGARDLESS OF THE ASSUMPTION OF THEM BEING A MEDIUM OF EXCHANGE. See the phrase "in and of itself".

Anyway, this is slowly evolving into a flame war, and I don't want to be a jerk (I feel I will be in my next post, if I'm not already). So I won't reply anymore.
10  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anyone here use Bitcoins? on: January 24, 2014, 06:46:07 AM
What would Bitcoin hashes go for, if it weren't for the implicit agreement that they are a medium of exchange?

the same as todays dollar - and all other money I know of. Not an argument against Bitcoin, unless you also use it as an argument against money as we know it today.

Well, I'd also raise the same argument against the dollar, or peso, or lira, or euro, whatever, if it did needlessly contribute to global warming. Sure they do (dead trees), but not at the scale applicable to bitcoin mining I reckon.

Does someone have solid statistics on this? i.e. you get x dollars worth of bitcoins after burning y dollars worth of electricity on a rig that cost z dollars to build.

That would really bring our discussion to some solid footing here.
11  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anyone here use Bitcoins? on: January 24, 2014, 03:44:04 AM
Just because someone is attracted to something doesn't define an intrinsic value.  I think intrinsic value is pretty much universally taken to be characterized in terms of the value that something has “in itself,” or “for its own sake,” or “as such,” or “in its own right.”  Gold has no value in and of itself, other than as you say as a shiny bauble.  Therefore, gold has no intrinsic value.

I wouldn't discount the shine as a source of value. Value is defined as the likelihood to get something else in return. I could imagine shiny rocks buying services to some caveman in a cave bordello. In other words you could use it in barter, even before the invention of money. I can't imagine that for random strings of numbers.

And I wouldn't discount jewelry as a functional use. People like it, so it is valuable. In your logic, aesthetical choices do not deserve value, and for instance, you would not pay extra for a fancy house paint color, given limewash is cheaper, and does the bare function of keeping the walls clean. But we do pay extra to paint our house walls green, pink, champagne etc. don't we? Because our sense of aesthetics imposes the function, hence the value. Saying electronics count as a legitimate use, but jewelry doesn't isn't very consistent.

So, gold is valuable in and of itself. Perhaps not the value it fetches today, as it is also considered as a safe investment instrument as you mention, but still some. Say it would command $4 per gram, rather than today's price of $40. But it would command "a price" nonetheless.

What would Bitcoin hashes go for, if it weren't for the implicit agreement that they are a medium of exchange?
12  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anyone here use Bitcoins? on: January 23, 2014, 10:38:57 PM
Gold has no intrinsic value.  The only value is what people place on it.  When people mine gold, they use power for all sorts of things, under the assurance that they will be paid for it, out of the fact that people want it.

I'd disagree with this. Cavemen (or perhaps cavewomen) were attracted to shiny things, so they were attracted to gold, even before it became a medium of exchange. In the iron age it was also used as an ingredient in copper alloys to make them more sturdy. And yes, it predates the minting of the first coin by Lydians. Today we still make jewelry, in addition to substantial use in industry. 10% of all gold mined is used in industrial purposes. If it had been cheaper, the ratio would undoubtedly increase.

So, gold always had and always will have an intrinsic value. What's the intrinsic value of bitcoin hashes? It looks more and more like the shares of the South Sea Trading Company.
13  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Does anyone here use Bitcoins? on: January 23, 2014, 09:42:44 PM
But it doesn't.

The other things we used to generate money, for instance mining gold, had an actual use other than just generating money. Actually, the original function of gold (making shiny things women like, using in alloys to make rust resistant weapons etc.) predated the use as legal tender.

This one doesn't have another function. You just burn electricity, and assure yourself that you'll be paid for it. No intrinsic purpose whatsoever.
14  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Bitcoin mining craze on: January 23, 2014, 06:16:05 PM
Now did my reading, but I'm still none the wiser as to why do we burn power? Assume that I'm not a huge fan of Ron Paul, so the "alternative to government conspiracy" brand of arguments would also not make much sense to me.
15  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Bitcoin mining craze on: January 23, 2014, 05:03:52 PM
uhh.. yes, obviously missed those. Thanks for pointing them out. I'll be reading now smiley
16  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Bitcoin mining craze on: January 23, 2014, 04:38:40 PM
I wonder what's all the fuss about this. Computing power costs electricity. Here in Turkey, a 7/24 draw of 300 watts would cost about 25 Dollars a month. Does the bitcoin mining thingie produce more than this (+ the capital expenditure of course)?

And why are the people make their computers burn fossil fuel (albeit indirectly) to solve useless hash algorithms? I can justify folding@home, and even seti@home... but as far as I can see, the computing power used for bitcoin mining is used just for the sake of proving it is used. Like counting sands on a beach. No use whatsoever.

Am I the only one who does not get it?
17  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: email provider for multiple accounts on: January 12, 2014, 04:53:09 PM
Oh ok. Outlook allows you to do that too smiley
18  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: email provider for multiple accounts on: January 12, 2014, 04:50:34 PM
outlook.com (latest incarnation of hotmail) allows you to do that.
Like google apps did when it was free.

Here's a guide.
19  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: need freeware .vob to MP4 converter on: January 03, 2014, 01:55:44 PM
Handbrake
20  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Elitists of the World - UNITE! on: December 05, 2013, 09:06:58 AM
Bad spellers of the world, UNETI!
21  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: So-called upgrades that ruin good programs on: October 22, 2013, 02:48:38 AM
Any office with ribbon (i.e. 2007 and newer).
Especially when imposed on you on a tiny netbook screen.
22  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: National debt/defecit: what does it REALLY mean?? on: September 20, 2013, 07:56:31 AM
States don't have banknote printing presses.

It is a small detail, but a very crucial one.
23  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: National debt/defecit: what does it REALLY mean?? on: September 18, 2013, 11:36:27 PM
1. Probably never, the debt circulates.
2. Theoretically yes. But no one in his/her sane mind would demand wholesale repayment. It would hit the global economy incomparably harder than 2008.
3. As long as it is in a currency you can print freely (in Dollars for US, in Drachmas, not in Euros in Greece) sky is the limit. Don't worry.
4. Mostly to 401(k) people. Some to Chinese government, some to Japanese and European banks.
5. See answer 2.
6. If they did ask it back, US government would put a Benjamin Franklin pictures on blank sheets of paper, and sell it to the creditors $100 a piece. When you do that on a 1.6 trillion dollar scale, hyperinflation ensues. No one on this planet (well perhaps except north korea's latest great fantastic leader) wants dollar hyperinflation because it is the de facto global currency. Everyone has some receivable in it. You don't want your receivables to lose value.
7. Not necessarily. But bigger guns wouldn't hurt (you).
8. The debt is not directly related with the income equality. It has mostly to do with your taxation system and tax breaks, as well as legal system (legal costs are astronomical, so poor can't defend their rights against the incursions by the rich). Anyway, the interest rates on US government bonds is so low that it does not make the creditors richer.
9. Who said the debt is getting paid?

These are my personal views, though some like Paul Krugman would concur with most of them.
24  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: memory use and reason on: September 16, 2013, 11:14:01 AM
Considering Firefox starts with around that and easily climbs to 3X or more the longer it runs, I wouldn't be too surprised or concerned if you're not concerned about using Skype to begin with.

Firefox shows things. A small bitmap image of size, say, 400x300 alone would take 480 KB of ram, just to show it. And I don't even mention javascript and other memory hogs.

But skype?
How hard could it be just to provide a chat facility? (at the moment I saw the 160MB memory consumption, there was no audio/video business, just plain old keyboard chat with two friends.)
25  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / memory use and reason on: September 16, 2013, 09:49:40 AM
[attach]

Skype taking 160 MB of memory?

What the f is NSA running on my computer?
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