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1426  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: More speed/bandwidth from an 802.11n laptop<-->WiFi Router/Modem connection? on: February 19, 2013, 02:13:10 AM
The rate seems to fluctuate  between 32 and 52mbps, regardless of whether you are up close to the router or 9 meters away and with two plasterboard and steel-framed walls in between. I have seen momentary peaks of 58.5 and 59.0mbps at the 9 metre point and momentary troughs of 23mbps.
Any other appliances involved? Probably not, because:
  • Switching off/on a nearby TV doesn't seem to make any noticeable difference.
  • Switching off/on IPv6 support for the Broadcom WiFi device doesn't seem to make any noticeable difference either.

I don't know which is the weakest link.
I could try:
  • checking the performance of the ADSL2+ connection for any constraint.
  • fitting a newer model WiFi device with "full" 802.11n support, in the laptop.
  • installing a 150 or 300mbps router with "full" 802.11n support.

I suspect that it may be that you'll never get the 100+ mbps rates unless both the router and the WiFi device have identical or "full" 802.11n support, but that's just a guess. I don't know enough about this technology to figure out a fix.
1427  DonationCoder.com Software / Find And Run Robot / Re: Disatisfied with default skins, decided to make my own in autohotkey on: February 19, 2013, 01:19:31 AM
@Expletive: Thanks. Oh dear, something else to play with now!    Wink
1428  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / More speed/bandwidth from an 802.11n laptop<-->WiFi Router/Modem connection? on: February 18, 2013, 07:41:08 PM
I have set up someone's TP-Link TD-8950ND 150Mbps Wireless N ADSL2+ Modem Router.
It all seems to be running fine, except that the laptop I am using is only making 30-58mbps connections (rated as being "Good" to "Excellent", respectively). This is currently with just the 1 laptop connected to the network.
The complex screenshot below should explain all. (Thankyou @Mouser/Screenshot Captor.)

What I am wanting to figure out is how I can get the laptop performance to be (say) 100mbps or more.

The TP-Link router/modem seems to have the latest firmware (I checked):
  • Firmware Version: 1.2.6 build 101206 Rel.68715n
  • Hardware Version: W8950ND vi 00000001

The Broadcom WiFi device has the latest driver version (I checked).

I suspect the problem may be to do with a lack of draft-n standardisation:
  • On the cardboard box the TP-Link device came in, it says it is "Wireless Lite N".
  • The Broadcom WiFi device driver says it is "802.11 a/b/g/draft-n"

Any ideas please?    tellme

[attachthumb=#]
1429  News and Reviews / Mini-Reviews by Members / Re: xplorer², a powerful windows file manager and explorer replacement / alternative on: February 18, 2013, 03:39:06 PM
When are you going to ask him?
EDIT 2013-02-19 1230hrs: OIC. Censored. Sorry, I did not realise. My joke was probably lost then.
1430  DonationCoder.com Software / Find And Run Robot / Re: Disatisfied with default skins, decided to make my own in autohotkey on: February 18, 2013, 03:31:48 PM
Hmm. I have to say that I like it, and that it does look pretty, but to a student of ergonomics and graphical design it might not seem too hot ergonomically/visually.
Why are you "currently on a quest to glass everything I possibly can"?
I'm not sure that it would necessarily be correct to call this "glassing" everything an improvement though.    undecided
1431  DonationCoder.com Software / Post New Requests Here / Re: IDEA: super word counter on: February 18, 2013, 03:01:33 PM
@Joe Hone: I think I understand your needs a bit better now. Ultimately, I suspect that you may need to take an evaluation path  - a "suck-it-and-see" approach - to find something that meets your defined/undefined needs/criteria. The evaluation would probably not only help you to better define your needs and compare those needs against available solutions, but also help you to discover some new needs that might become "mandatory" or "highly desirable" criteria.

I googled "comparison review of automated text proofreading software", and came up with a slew of relevant references. There seem to be a lot of online and PC-based grammar-checking tools on offer, but I have no experience of them to be able to suggest any.
There was an interesting article referred to: Proofreading test: my wife vs. Grammarly vs. Ginger vs. After The Deadline vs. Microsoft Word 2010, where a simple (and useful) comparison test is made and the results given:
  • Grammarly - score: 3/8
  • Ginger - score: 3/8
  • After The Deadline - score: 3/8
  • Microsoft Word 2010 - score: 4/8
  • a skilled human proof-reader - score: 8/8

Here is the Proofreading test summary:
Quote
What we take away from this five-way match up is that you can’t beat the eye of a human proofreader. Digital tools can be useful as spellcheckers, grammar fixers and synonym suggesters. In some cases, they can help you improve your basic writing skills and steer you away from embarrassing copy-editing errors as you create content.

But there’s more to proofreading than hunting for typos and making sure you haven’t written ‘your’ when the sentence structure calls for ‘you’re’.

What digital tools like Grammarly, Ginger and After The Deadline CAN’T do is check that web links point to the right pages, that names are spelled correctly or that facts and figures are accurate. So while they might claim to ‘proofread’ text, they actually don’t. You’d be better off doing it yourself or getting somebody else to check copy for you.

Hope this helps or is of use.
1432  DonationCoder.com Software / Screenshot Captor / Re: LATEST VERSION INFO THREAD - ScreenshotCaptor - v3.08.01 - July 6, 2012 on: February 18, 2013, 07:53:30 AM
SSC red fixed region boundary lines make a slightly too small area - episodic bug?
When you press Shift+Ctrl+Prt Sc, red fixed region boundary lines automatically appear as a rectangle around the active window.
Sometimes these image boundary lines make for a slightly smaller area than that of the object selected.
This has only happened twice to me and is so far not something that I can deliberately invoke:
This is the image captured when the boundary lines made a slightly smaller area than that of the object selected:

[attachthumb=#]

Image captured via OneNote capture.

[attachthumb=#]
1433  DonationCoder.com Software / Post New Requests Here / Re: IDEA: super word counter on: February 18, 2013, 07:13:19 AM
If you are using MS-Word, then you can probably find almost everything you need to do in the Options menus. I find it tremendously useful - e.g., for Grammar & Style checking, and for flagging repetition, clichés and wordiness.
Image example below is from Word 2013, but I think it is the same for Word 2007:

[attachthumb=#]

Word count is catered for in the Status Bar at the bottom:

[attachthumb=#]

If you want to check for repetition of certain phrases and words throughout a document, the Search or Search/Replace automates it for you to some extent.

However, the best check is to get someone - e.g., a peer who is good at proofreading and who knows your subject reasonably well - to review the document and comment on it. I was trained to always do this before issuing a report to a client. Once you get over the initial ego-hit when the peer review turns up so many faults, you find it a great timesaver and it helps you to understand and correct for the sorts of habitual, unconscious mistakes that the exercise shows that you tend to make the most.
This is learning from our mistakes as spotted by others, because often we cannot see our own mistakes until they are pointed out to us. Not easy for the arrogant, or those with sensitive egos!    Wink
1434  News and Reviews / Mini-Reviews by Members / Re: xplorer², a powerful windows file manager and explorer replacement / alternative on: February 18, 2013, 05:58:27 AM
...Just a quick question for everyone. How do you feel about the current version of xplorer2 or do you find yourself using another file manager?

I have a lifetime licence for xplorer² PRO, and have the v2.2.0.2 x64 version. It works fine.
The only time I use another Explorer is when I use Windows Explorer to restore all the saved Registry settings for xplorer²! You can't do that whilst xplorer² is running, apparently.
I have found that the xplorer² Registry settings sometimes get expunged - not sure if it is CCleaner or something else doing that. I have lots of Bookmarks in xplorer², and it is a real pain in the proverbial when they are deleted. Restoring them by automating the process is a darn site quicker than recreating them from memory or on an ad hoc basis.
1435  DonationCoder.com Software / Finished Programs / Re: DONE: Delete folders within directory but not the files within the folder on: February 18, 2013, 05:41:10 AM
Posted across from another thread:
@nkormanik: Thanks for the info. - Moo0 RightClicker Pro 1.48 (Free to Try) looks rather nifty and seems to do some things for the right-click menu that I had not come across before.

@TucknDar: FileMenu Tools (Freeware) looks very interesting. In particular, I noticed that it includes this function:
  • Unpack Folder: Moves all the elements in the selected folders to the parent folder, and deletes these empty folders.

That could be useful as an alternative solution here: DONE: Delete folders within directory but not the files within the folder
1436  DonationCoder.com Software / Post New Requests Here / Re: In Explorer Context Menus, allow sub-folders, and custom positioning of entries on: February 18, 2013, 05:39:34 AM
@nkormanik: Thanks for the info. - Moo0 RightClicker Pro 1.48 (Free to Try) looks rather nifty and seems to do some things for the right-click menu that I had not come across before.

@TucknDar: FileMenu Tools (Freeware) looks very interesting. In particular, I noticed that it includes this function:
  • Unpack Folder: Moves all the elements in the selected folders to the parent folder, and deletes these empty folders.

That could be useful as an alternative solution here: DONE: Delete folders within directory but not the files within the folder
1437  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Millions of Free eBooks and Audio Books Online on: February 17, 2013, 03:27:08 AM
Seriously helpful post at Gizmo's Tech Support Alert:
Millions of Free eBooks and Audio Books Online
1438  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: silly humor - post 'em here! [warning some NSFW and adult content] on: February 17, 2013, 03:02:41 AM
Dr Assad's special eye test:

[attach]
1439  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: DOTCOM saga - updates on: February 15, 2013, 05:53:33 PM
There is a rather curious new item in Torrentfreak. In the matter of the undeleted files (see emboldened quotation below), it seems that Megaupload is currently not being allowed by the DOJ to attempt to establish in a court of law a defence that it (MU) had effectively been entrapped by what could apparently have been a tricky piece of underhand work by the DOJ.
But, given the facts as described (and which are apparently not disputed by the DOJ), then anyone (including the man on the Clapham omnibus) would presumably be able to see for themselves that that must have been the outcome/effect, whether or not the the DOJ had acted intentionally in that regard.

However, if, under the hard light of scrutiny in a legal court it can be shown that Megaupload acted in good faith in leaving the files undeleted, and if the Government did not mention Megaupload’s full cooperation in the indictment or the search warrants but instead used the fact that the files were not deleted as an example of criminal behavior as charged, then one obvious conclusion is that the Government may have acted in a deliberately biased or prejudicial manner so as to maximise the appearance that MU had exhibited criminal behaviour, whilst at the same time concealing from the court that there were mitigating circumstances that could clear MU of such a charge altogether. In that hard light, the charges might even seem bogus.

The thing is that this would seem to be a very easy thing for MU to demonstrate (it is factual), but a very flimsy assertion of guilt for the DOJ to hang on to. If it were challenged in a court of law, then it could even end up that the court could rule that the raids were carried out illegally under US law, as they have already been so deemed under New Zealand law.

So the DOJ has apparently decided to try to block MU from attempting to establish in a court of law a defence that it (MU) had effectively been innocent, if not entrapped, on this matter alone.
This seems remarkable to me. I hadn't realised that, under US law, an accused person could be blocked from defending themselves in such a manner.
If I have got all this aright, then I am completely mystified as to how it can be construed to be due legal process. I mean, how can a defence which points to genuine (not hypothetical) mitigating circumstances not be allowed? It would mean that the charges against MU would need to be reduced, if not collapsed.

It does seem to me as though someone in the Establishment must want to hang MU out to dry awful bad, and regardless of the legal niceties, and for such apparently legally flimsy and dubious accusations, to be so tightly protected by the Establishment.

Regardless of whether he has broken the law, it would seem to be no wonder that Dotcom might wish to avoid deportation to the US to face charges. How could he be expected to receive a fair hearing/trial given these (QED) and other circumstances (e.g., the NZ legal view)? The whole thing stinks - the planning and spying prior to the raid, the illegal raid, the apparent deliberate perjury by a/some police witnesses, the extraordinary mistakes/BS by the NZ government, the GCSB admissions of illegal spying.

The only bit that doesn't seem to stink so far is the good old objective NZ judiciary - which gives me some hope for that country's integrity.

Here is the Torrentfreak news item:
(Copied below sans embedded hyperlinks/images.)
Quote
Megaupload “Planted Evidence” Claim is an Unfounded Conspiracy Theory, U.S. Says
    Ernesto, February 15, 2013.
 
The Department of Justice has responded to Megaupload’s claims that they “planted” evidence and tried to mislead the court. According to United States Attorney Neil MacBride these allegations are “sensationalist rhetoric” and a “conspiracy theory.” The Government says it never asked Kim Dotcom’s file-hosting service to preserve any infringing files, and asks the court to deny Megaupload’s request to be heard on the matter.

Early January Megaupload filed a motion claiming the U.S. Government deliberately misled the court.

When the U.S. Government applied for the search warrants against Megaupload last year it told the court that they had warned Megaupload in 2010 that it was hosting infringing files.

Through its hosting company Megaupload was informed about a criminal search warrant in an unrelated case where the Government requested information on 39 infringing files stored by the file-hosting service.

At the time Megaupload cooperated with this request and handed over details on the uploaders. The files were kept online as Megaupload believed it was not to touch any of the evidence. However, a year later this inaction is being used by the U.S. Government to claim that Megaupload was negligent, leaving out much of the context.

According to Megaupload this course of action was misleading and the company now wants to address the matter through a so-called Frank’s hearing.

However, in a new filing yesterday the U.S. Government asks the court to deny Megaupload’s request. According to United States Attorney Neil MacBride it would allow Megaupload to circumvent the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure.

The United States Attorney further refutes Megaupload’s “planted evidence” allegations, saying that they’re an unfounded conspiracy theory, and certainly not enough to grant a hearing.

“Megaupload has supplied nothing but a conspiracy theory; this is not enough,” the U.S. writes.

“Because Megaupload’s claims are insufficient as a matter of law to authorize its intervention in this matter, Megaupload has wrapped them in layers of sensationalist rhetoric. However, Megaupload’s claims regarding government misconduct are unfounded.”

The Government argues that it never asked Megaupload to preserve any of files that were under investigation in the NinjaVideo case.

“The government made no preservation request, and the government is not aware that the service of a search warrant creates an obligation on the part of the recipient of a search warrant to preserve infringing content on a computer in a way that continues to make it available for illegal download.”

Megaupload’s argument that they didn’t want to disable access to the files, because this could alert the targets of the investigation, is also weak according to the U.S. – especially when Megaupload regularly disabled access to infringing links.

“If this [removing links] practice was common, it would not necessarily be alerting. Megaupload also, when removing infringing content, did not as a practice inform customers that their content had been removed. It is also unlikely that any Court would interpret a sealing order to require the continued distribution of infringing content,” the U.S. writes.

The U.S. basically says they did not specifically request that the files should remain intact, or be removed.

Dotcom’s lawyers may not contest this specific language, but find it misleading that the Government did not mention Megaupload’s full cooperation in the indictment or the search warrants. Instead, the U.S. uses the fact that the files were not deleted as an example of criminal behavior.

The U.S., however, believes that is was not necessary to provide the complete context.

“Megaupload’s theory that the government misled the Court by omitting a discussion of the June 24, 2010 search warrant misstates the relevant law. An affiant does not need to include every potentially relevant fact in a seizure warrant affidavit,” the U.S. writes.

The above, leads the Government to conclude that Megaupload should be denied a hearing on the matter.

However, United States Attorney Neil MacBride does not object to a Megaupload representative being heard as a witness in the hearing that’s scheduled for Megaupload user Kyle Goodwin, the reporter who is trying to gain access to his lost files.

“Though Megaupload’s claims are false, nothing prevents Kyle Goodwin from asserting them. If Mr. Goodwin wants to develop a factual basis for his claim, and the Court allows the live testimony, Mr. Goodwin could call a representative from Megaupload as a witness.”

The court now has to decide what action is appropriate here.

This upcoming decision may become crucial for the ongoing criminal proceedings. If the hearing is granted and the warrants are declared unlawful, as happened earlier in New Zealand, then Kim Dotcom and his fellow defendants will be at a significant advantage.
1440  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: silly humor - post 'em here! [warning some NSFW and adult content] on: February 15, 2013, 03:43:08 PM
tracert -h 100 216.81.59.173
try it.
Nifty! I got a slightly different result to @Renegade:
1441  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Internet freedoms restrained - SOPA/PIPA/OPEN/ACTA/CETA/PrECISE-related updates on: February 15, 2013, 03:39:07 AM
More news from the warfront via Techdirt. Apologies if this is a "political" post, but the subject seems to have been made inherently political in the US and elsewhere.
A clip from the Techdirt post is copied below sans embedded hyperlinks/images (my emphasis):
Quote
CISPA Wouldn't Actually Solve The Reasons Congress Is Giving For Why We Need CISPA
by Mike Masnick

As expected, Representatives Mike Rogers and Dutch Ruppersberger have reintroduced CISPA, exactly as it was when it passed the House last year. Incredibly, we've been hearing that they've brushed off the massive privacy concerns by claiming that those were all "fixed" in the final version of the bill that got approved. This is highly disingenuous. While it is true that they made some modifications to the bill at the very end before it got approved, most privacy watchers were (and are) still very concerned. They did convince one organization to flip-flop, and they seem to think that's all they need.

But, here's the thing that no one has done yet: explain why this bill is needed. With President Obama's executive order in place, the government can more easily share threat info with companies, so really the only thing that CISPA piles on is more incentives for companies to cough up private information to the government with little in the way of oversight or restrictions on how that information can be used. And given how frequently the government likes to cry "cyberattack" when it's simply not true, it's only a matter of time before they start using claims of "cyberthreat!" to troll through private information...
(Read the rest at the link.)
1442  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Adobe Reader zero-day on: February 15, 2013, 03:15:46 AM
This discussion thread just reminded me to uninstall Adobe Reader.
Now done. Thanks.    Thmbsup
1443  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / CyberGhost VPN Special Deal (worth a look) on: February 15, 2013, 03:08:57 AM
In reviews of VPN providers, CyberGhost comes out with a pretty good report.
They had a FREE sort of trial option that wasn't too bad at all, despite its constraints - bandwidth caps.
Now their business model seems to have been revamped along with their network, and they have the FREE option now with no cap, but I think it must be throttled. In addition, the annual tariff plan has been reduced as a limited time special offer. The tariff plans apparently give you a faster response time.

This is a clip from: Welcome to the new CyberGhost VPN
Quote
...We changed the tariff plan, so it’s easier for you to understand and decide for one of the two types of paid subscriptions: Premium and Premium Plus. Currently, our free service covers the basic needs, making a Classic subscription unnecessary.

To celebrate the kickoff of the new CyberGhost VPN, we offer you the 12 Month subscription for a limited amount of time for $39,99 instead of $69,99 and our CyberGhost Premium Plus for $69,99 instead of $109,99...
1444  Other Software / DC Gamer Club / Prince of Persia - HTML5 on: February 14, 2013, 11:59:53 PM
A nifty bit of coding, and (IMO) a worthwhile objective.
Any offers of help/assistance to the author?
Prince of Persia - HTML5
1445  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: MS Office 2013 Home/Business - non-transferable (1 PC p.person) - Caveat emptor. on: February 13, 2013, 07:25:55 PM
Thanks. To avoid going down the rat-hole, I corrected the post to read:
Quote
Increasingly Libre/OpenOffice and others are looking better by comparison, and of course the Google Docs alternative too
1446  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: MS Office 2013 Home/Business - non-transferable (1 PC p.person) - Caveat emptor. on: February 13, 2013, 05:53:07 PM
Yes, it seems a very strange marketing strategy - increasingly restrictive and controlling for the Customer. I suspect that only someone with more money than sense would buy the MS Office 2013 Home/Business product knowing the licence constraints. The advice otherwise would seem to be to avoid it altogether - the product is effectively in a product lifecycle cul-de-sac (a dead end). Why would a user want to be trapped in such a business relationship with the behemoth Microsoft?

As for MS Office 365, well, I guess that from Microsoft's $$$ perspective maybe there is potentially "one born every minute".

Increasingly Libre/OpenOffice and others are looking better by comparison, and of course the Google Docs alternative too - though Google's unilateral and without a "by-your-leave" shutting down of many of its other offerings is likely to ensure that no prudent user could seriously commit to Google Docs without swallowing a load of potential risk - e.g., a decision to decommission the service could happen overnight, leaving you high and dry.
1447  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / MS Office 2013 Home/Business - non-transferable (1 PC p.person) - Caveat emptor. on: February 13, 2013, 03:56:28 PM
I subscribe to Office Watch (was "WOW" or Woody's Office Watch).
They just sent out an interesting bit of information that you can find on their website:
Are you sure about non-transferable?
(Some pertinent snippets quoted below, sans embedded hyperlinks/images.)
Quote
Office 2013 can't be moved from the computer you first install it on - we’re quite sure.

..." How can I use the software?

We do not sell our software or your copy of it – we only license it. Under our license we grant you the right to install and run that one copy on one computer (the licensed computer) for use by one person at a time, but only if you comply with all the terms of this agreement. Our software license is permanently assigned to the licensed computer. "

or

"Can I transfer the software to another computer or user? 

You may not transfer the software to another computer or user. "

It’s the same wording for both Retail and OEM copies of Office 2013. OEM copies are sold, usually pre-installed, on new computers...

...Amazon is more careful about disclosing the Office 2013 terms. One of the bullet point ‘Product Features’ is:
"One time purchase for the life of your PC; non-transferrable"...
1448  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Hi-Tech laptop cooling modification for laptops. on: February 13, 2013, 06:30:40 AM
Ianb, wouldn't it be better to not have the moisture or "warm humid air" going into the laptop?  I have not been sold on the laptop cooling pads that have the fans in them and are powered by USB.  
But I also have to wonder about putting it into the freezer... how good can that be for it??
My answer to the first question would have to be "No". The empiric approach described actually works, and so far unfailingly, over the several years that I have used it.
Normally humid air is going to be sucked into the laptop anyway. The HTLCM (Hi-Tech laptop cooling modification) just makes it more humid, that's all.
If you are worried about condensation, don't be. You would be unlikely to get condensation forming inside a warm laptop, but I suspect that dropping it into a freezer could cause condensation to form somewhere - probably on the copper heatsinks especially - until it has all warmed up. Being a bit paranoid, I wouldn't advocate the freezer approach for that reason, though I could be wrong, of course.

I think @Renegade's idea of putting ice as the filling in a sandwich of cloth is worth exploring for laptops that seem to run critically hot, though in my experience, laptops that might run that hot may often be overdue for an inside clean, as described.
If your cooling air pathways are clear, then using the HTLCM could significantly drop the CPU (and maybe also disk) temperatures in a short space of time.
1449  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Hi-Tech laptop cooling modification for laptops. on: February 13, 2013, 03:34:40 AM
I am a longtime laptop user, and I usually take a laptop apart at 6-monthly service intervals and clean up its airways, fan(s) and heat exchanger(s) to restore the cooling efficiency to its as-new state. The cooling efficiency can otherwise degrade quite significantly over time as the insides get clogged-up with fluff and dust. The tools I use are a screwdriver, a toothbrush, a small paintbrush and a vacuum cleaner with a narrow nozzle.

However, if the service is overdue, or if the PC has got some seriously heavy CPU load on and it's a hot day, then I set up a Hi-Tech laptop cooling modification that I invented years ago. The other day it was a case of "some seriously heavy CPU load on and it's a hot day", and I was in a non-airconditioned area.
It's moving towards midsummer where I am in NZ and after a bit of a cold start it's getting hotter, grassy areas are turning brown, and the fire danger warning signs along major roads through country areas are up to "High" (which is typical for this time of year). My laptop's Intel i7 was running a couple of CPU-intensive processes at about 13 percent each and the cooling fan was working at high speed but holding the temperatures stable. I could see the hot spots by looking at the Speedfan monitor display.

So I enabled the Hi-Tech laptop cooling modification:

[attachthumb=#]

[attachthumb=#]

I got the idea after driving with my brother in his old Jaguar Mk10 across semi-arid desert from LA to the Sequoia National Park, some years ago. Before we set off across the desert, he did something I had never seen done before: he pulled into a gas station, opened the trunk and took a large burlap canvas water bag with "Water Camel" and the picture of a camel printed in red and black on its side. Then he opened a stopper on the bag, filled it up with water from a nearby tap, closed the stopper, opened the hood and strapped the bag onto the front of the radiator, using straps attached to the bag.
Me: "What's that for?"
Bro.: "It'll keep the water temperature down. The water slowly soaks through the burlap, evaporates, and the water vapour gets blown into the radiator core. Cools it."
Me: "But won't it block the airflow?"
Bro." "A little bit, but the cooling effect will far outweigh any increased risk of heat build up from restricted airflow."
He then explained the physics of it to me and said that these bags had been used since the '20s.
My brother is a boffin and an aeronautical engineer, and never does anything without good reason - if he says so, it's likely to be right. And it was - the engine ran a degree or so cooler across the desert than it did in LA traffic. An example of the use of dead basic science.
1450  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Grab 50GB of Box Online Storage Free for Life (2013-02-12) on: February 12, 2013, 04:45:35 PM
Good offer. Via Lifehacker:
Grab 50GB of Box Online Storage Free for Life

If you know of someone who needs it or could use it, then get it whilst it's available.
No strings - "Restricted to New email account sign-ups".
Lifehacker suggests dropping the dot in your email address...that should work OK.
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