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1  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Leonard Nimoy, Dead at 83 on: February 27, 2015, 03:42:06 PM
Confession: At age 6, Mr. Spock was my first crush.
2  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: silly humor - post 'em here! [warning some NSFW and adult content] on: February 22, 2015, 02:50:14 PM
Cop: "I'm a total badass"

DogCop: "ARE YOU TAKING A PHOTO? OMG I WANNA BE IN THE PHOTO"

[attach=1]
3  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: silly humor - post 'em here! [warning some NSFW and adult content] on: February 22, 2015, 01:57:31 PM
(Most are around 250~500 GB 10k RPM drives, so not really worth salvaging -- IIRC.)

Much larger than the old 80G drives my father recycled by sticking them in USB enclosures, filling them with data (I am deliberately not saying what kind), and giving them as gifts. The recipients were thrilled to get them.  Wink
4  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Happy New Year! 恭禧發財! 새해 복 많이 받으세요! on: February 20, 2015, 05:10:00 AM

5  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: email notifiers (whew) on: February 20, 2015, 04:14:49 AM
I have a need to watch more than one Gmail account, and the Gmail Watcher add-on for Firefox can watch up to 3, when using Google multiple sign in mode.

In addition to giving me a toaster style visual alert at the bottom of my screen, which I am not really that interested in, I can also have an optional audio alert, and I have it set with the most obnoxious wav file I can find.

A really nice option this has is how it can be set to automatically max your PC's volume when it plays that wav, then turn it back down to the way it was.

One thing some may not like is how it does require you to have your browser open and you to be logged in to Gmail at all times. Which is not a big deal for me, since I usually have it open, any way, and 2 of my browser tabs are dedicated to keeping me always logged into Gmail.

It's not all that complex, but it will definitely alert me when I have new mail, I can hear it in almost any room of my home (good when doing housework) and even wake me up if I happen to be napping. (which means I can nap during the day and still respond to incoming support tickets within 60 seconds  Wink)

Quote
The post explains why it is currently out of consideration, which for many would be a minor issue.

If you need to have it repeat the alarm, it can be set to do that by unchecking the box for "only alert for new additional emails". And the frequency of the alarms would be controlled by the frequency it autochecks for new mail (the slider at the top).

[attach=1]

And if you want to use the same obnoxious wav file I am using, you can grab it out of the .zip of my PesterMe app.  Wink

Just imagine that playing at full volume every 60 seconds, till someone reads that e-mail, and you'll understand why I suggested it.  cheesy
6  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: stickies Notezilla memoboard as full-blown personal note system on: February 17, 2015, 10:18:35 PM
April
http://appsapps.info/about.php
Apps Apps
http://appsapps.info/

"And among my payware tools, you'll find Beyond Compare: http://www.scootersoftware.com/
and Notezilla (every project and website gets its own memoboard): http://www.conceptworld.com/Notezilla"

This is a carry over habit that goes back to my 3M Post-it Software Notes days, where I would build a tabbed memoboard for each project and run into issues with its limitations (max 12 tabs per board, no way to split tabs any further without resorting to mental hacks, using visual cues, such as color & position). Notezilla was a breath of fresh air.
7  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Reliable Web Hosting for $5 or less? on: February 16, 2015, 05:29:52 PM
$5 * 12 months = $60 per year.

How about $2 per month, or $20 per year?

DC member pip2kk, who I have known for at least 13 years, owns a hosting company with some very reasonably priced plans: http://www.mycustomhostin...et/cpanel-web-hosting.php

He won't do any hand holding, so if you don't know your way around Cpanel or don't know how to use a real hosting account, it might not be the right web host for you.
8  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: The return of Clippy! Microsoft says more about their digital assistant Cortana on: February 12, 2015, 07:55:51 PM
The crapware that gets bundled with things like Java is a completely different discussion, because that stuff does get detected and removed by anti-spyware.

It actually doesn't.  The ask toolbar isn't considered to be malware, at least by any of the scanners that I use.  At most, it's flagged as questionable.  The official Java installer installs the Ask toolbar.  And Oracle is just as large as the other players. And no one says anything about it.

Also, Oracle didn't make the Ask toolbar, while Apple did make iTunes and Siri, Google did make the Google toolbar and the Chrome browser, and Microsoft did make Cortana, and a ton of other crap that I can't recall at this moment.

While Oracle can be blamed for bundling questionable software and with the way they present it in their installer, they can't be blamed for what the Ask toolbar actually contains or does.

Should anti-malware prevent you from installing Java or deactivate/remove Java if it is found on your system? Or just the Ask toolbar, which is not Oracle's product? That is the difference.
9  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: The return of Clippy! Microsoft says more about their digital assistant Cortana on: February 12, 2015, 07:13:46 PM
So, what does that mean? It's ok when a large corporation creates software that spies on you and collects data for marketing purposes, but not ok when smaller companies create less advanced software, capable of collecting less info, for the same purpose?

*cough* Java *cough*

It has been annoying me for a while that it can bundle the ask toolbar with it by default selected, and no one calls them on it...

I am talking more about things like the Ask toolbar, itself. Why is that considered unacceptable malware/spyware/adware and things like Cortana, Siri, and Google Now are not? There was quite a few applications in the first generation of this type of software that were quite useful and users went out of their way to install, that collected data on it's users for marketing purposes (Go!Zilla, Flashget, Copernic Shopper, Gator, ZipUpTheWeb, WeatherBug, etc). Why is the new generation of big corporate spyware considered acceptable and not held up to the same standards as the old stuff was subjected to, and that stuff from smaller companies is still subjected to?

Well, yes, the ask toolbar is bad.  But it is even worse in that it's being bundled with Java.  Like all of these companies are in bed with each other to erode the consciousness of the average consumer to the point where this kind of thing is commonplace and accepted.

I will agree that the Ask toolbar is bad, more because of how it ends up on a user's system. But would someone that actually went to the Ask website and willingly downloaded and installed the toolbar, because they wanted it, feel the same way? There are plenty of people that I know that have gone out of their way to install the Alexa toolbar, which is in the same category. Yes, both are spyware. But they are not more spyware-ish than the Google toolbar ever was, and that toolbar was never flagged by spyware removers.

I willingly downloaded and installed Flashget, and even paid for it (for ad removal), and later on had to tell my anti-spyware software to ignore it and not remove it from my system.

Same with Copernic Shopper (which I miss), and Gator (I used to be a freebie hunter and had to fill out a lot of forms on a daily basis. Gator made it quick & easy, and was the only software like it, that I could find at the time).

All of these were flagged by anti-spyware apps for good reasons...but the new spyware by big companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple are not held to the same standards as these apps were, and they are no less spyware than the old stuff was, and in some ways they are even worse.

And that is my point.

The crapware that gets bundled with things like Java is a completely different discussion, because that stuff does get detected and removed by anti-spyware.

When was the last time you saw Spybot S&D or Malwarebytes flag and offer to remove iTunes, Quicktime, Google toolbar, etc. And what is the likelihood that they will ever offer to deactivate/neuter Cortana for you?
10  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: The return of Clippy! Microsoft says more about their digital assistant Cortana on: February 12, 2015, 06:16:42 PM
So, what does that mean? It's ok when a large corporation creates software that spies on you and collects data for marketing purposes, but not ok when smaller companies create less advanced software, capable of collecting less info, for the same purpose?

*cough* Java *cough*

It has been annoying me for a while that it can bundle the ask toolbar with it by default selected, and no one calls them on it...

I am talking more about things like the Ask toolbar, itself. Why is that considered unacceptable malware/spyware/adware and things like Cortana, Siri, and Google Now are not? There was quite a few applications in the first generation of this type of software that were quite useful and users went out of their way to install, that collected data on it's users for marketing purposes (Go!Zilla, Flashget, Copernic Shopper, Gator, ZipUpTheWeb, WeatherBug, etc). Why is the new generation of big corporate spyware considered acceptable and not held up to the same standards as the old stuff was subjected to, and that stuff from smaller companies is still subjected to?
11  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: The return of Clippy! Microsoft says more about their digital assistant Cortana on: February 12, 2015, 04:15:54 PM
Translated into English, that means that the primary function of Cortana (as with Siri and Google Now) is to collect personal information about you to sell your profile to marketers.

Once upon a time there was a notorious purple monkey that you could talk to. And because he did that, they called him spyware. His existence was just one of many cases that lead to the the creation and need for anti-spyware applications.

[attach=1]

Now we have a new breed of spyware, that for some twisted corporate political reason, it is considered acceptable when they do the same as the old spyware, and the anti-spyware applications do not and will not detect and offer to remove them.

Personally, I do not see the difference between the Cortana, Siri, and the purple monkey, except that the latter was a bit less advanced in its capabilities in both what it could do for the user, and in how much data it could collect about them.

So, what does that mean? It's ok when a large corporation creates software that spies on you and collects data for marketing purposes, but not ok when smaller companies create less advanced software, capable of collecting less info, for the same purpose?
12  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: The return of Clippy! Microsoft says more about their digital assistant Cortana on: February 11, 2015, 04:44:22 PM
Have they really improved their voice recognition a lot, since this demonstration of its capabilities?

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Y_Jp6PxsSQ" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Y_Jp6PxsSQ</a>

I predict it will be as pleasurable to use as this, especially if you have any sort of accent that would be considered foreign to its developers:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMS2VnDveP8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMS2VnDveP8</a>
13  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Funky Character Art on: February 11, 2015, 04:12:15 PM
A former user name that I used some years ago, when I used to host a chat server...an owl. (This is what would appear on the user list as the host of the room.)

«(ò¸Ó)»

Sleeping:

«(-¸-)»

Winking:

«(-¸Ó)»

And the back view, with tail feathers:

«( ¸ )»
14  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: publishing notes to the net on: February 10, 2015, 06:58:37 PM
I am going to have to recommend Trello again, for this one. The ability to invite people to share a board you have created covers this usage, as well as giving them the ability to ask questions and comment on notes.
15  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: License, registration, and insurance...or your cell phone on: February 10, 2015, 04:55:45 PM
I reckon there's not too many people who dont have a mobile phone, especially here at dc. Option #3 could be modified to: I'm not concerned because I dont own a smartphone (or add as another option?).

I don't have a mobile phone of any sort, smartphone, dumbphone, or otherwise.  Wink

Nor do I really have a need for one, except maybe once every few years when some family member goes into panic mode when I am not home and they don't know where I am for a few hours.

I say if you willingly hand your phone to a police officer, you should assume that he will snoop through it. But as long as it's just an option, and not required, then I don't mind the choice being there.

It's only just an option at this point because while many people do own mobile phones, we can't expect everyone to...yet.

Couldn't you use one of the password-protection apps, like Asus' own App Locker that was supplied with my Asus tablet, to prevent easy, casual snooping?

Is this available for phones, too? All phones, regardless of OS? And would it still allow an officer easy access to the e-documents he would need access to? And would an officer want to give you the time needed to activate it, before handing him the phone?
16  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / License, registration, and insurance...or your cell phone on: February 10, 2015, 07:47:56 AM
It's possible that in the near future, if you are pulled over by an officer, you'll just hand over your mobile phone when he asks for license, registration, and proof of insurance.

While electronic versions of these documents would be convenient for many, the current practice of an officer taking the paper/plastic versions of them back to his vehicle while he writes up your ticket, could pose some privacy risks, if he is taking your mobile phone to his vehicle, instead.

What is going to stop him from snooping through your phone, at the same time?

A recently passed bill in New Jersey allows electronic proof of insurance, like 37 other states already allow, but explicitly forbids police from accessing any other information on the phone.

But the original version of that recent NJ bill would have allowed police officers to search a driver's mobile phone without a warrant, to determine if a driver was texting or talking on the phone at the time of an accident.

And while it would be forbidden for an officer to snoop under this current e-insurance bill, it might not be in the next one covering e-drivers licenses, or it might not be under future legislation, or in states other than New Jersey.

And even if snooping is illegal, it would still be up to the officer to be a good guy, acting with integrity and complying with that part of the law. What if he doesn't feel like it? What if he snoops and finds something he can use against you and claims an "oops, my finger slipped" moment, leading to the discovery of that data (or he exploits some other loophole in the law to cover his butt)?

License, registration and cell phone: Showing insurance proof on smart phones coming soon?
E-Driver’s License Legislation in N.J. Gains Momentum

[attach=1]
17  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: taskbar clutter - back to the virtual desktop GoScreen on: February 08, 2015, 03:16:07 PM
I do have a question about the system tray or notification area. It seems like that should have a quick improvement tab that shows you names and whatevers.   It really is more than notifications, it is used by many programs as an alternate taskbar area.  Leading to abundant hovering.

That leads to another question. In Windows 7, can all programs that are in the system tray be pinned to taskbar?  That would be a leveling method, and would work well with my virtual desktop usage. And then maybe just leave a couple of system monitors in the "notification" area.

I am using PS Tray Factory. The only icons visible in my tray are the ones that display info or ones that I would need frequent access to. The rest are hidden behind the PS Tray Factory icon, accessible from its menu. I also get to control the order in which the icons are displayed, so their position is uniform and does not change. I can also minimize any application to the tray, and not just those in which the developer decided to add such support. And I can change the icon displayed to one of my own choosing.  Wink
18  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: taskbar clutter - back to the virtual desktop GoScreen on: February 08, 2015, 06:58:02 AM
The Windows taskbar is a truly awesome thing! Microsoft really messed up when it came to how they have presented the default configuration to the user, all these years.

You don't have to keep the taskbar at the bottom, and you don't have to limit yourself to a row or 2.

You can do something like this, and have all the room you need to organize your shortcuts in a manner that makes the most sense to you.

This is a screenshot from my current Win7 desktop:

[attachthumb=1]

And this is an annotated screenshot of my previous XP desktop, to explain how it's all arranged (I have been doing this since Win98).

[attachthumb=2]
19  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: What are the consequences of an FCC Internet "utility"? on: February 06, 2015, 09:49:26 PM
Purely on the basis that it is a natural monopoly, is repeatably and highly abusive to consumers because of that natural monopoly, and because they are turning immense profits off of an aging network that is in dire need of capacity upgrades.

But in most parts of the country, it's not a natural monopoly. It's an unnatural monopoly. A natural monopoly would be when you naturally have no competition. An unnatural one is when you suck extra money out of the pockets of your customers to provide local municipalities with kickbacks franchise fees to secure the legal right to not have any competition within that municipality.

However, contrary to many people's expectations, the draft rules will also keep other parts of Title II that allow the FCC to: enforce consumer privacy rules; extract funds from Internet providers to help subsidize services for rural Americans, educators and the poor; and make sure services such as Google Fiber can build new broadband pipes more easily, according to people familiar with the plan.

Internet providers won't be asked to contribute to the subsidy fund, known as Universal Service, right away. The draft rules merely open the door to that obligation down the road should the FCC determine that step is necessary. (The Universal Service Fund helps schools and libraries buy Internet service and reduces the cost of telephone service for low-income Americans. It also subsidizes connectivity for rural areas. If the FCC later decides to ask Internet providers to pay into the fund, the money would go toward these programs.)

Check your landline phone bill, gas & electric bill. Your phone and utility company were told to contribute to this fund out of their profits, but never has contributed a dime towards it. Instead you have. You pay for it, for them, 100%. And the same will happen when (not if) the FCC demands money from the ISPs. Your bill will go up to cover it.

My next question would be, what did we accomplish by this step of formally classifying the internet as a "common carrier" ?  who does this benefit?  what is going to change?


We established an additional revenue stream for the government, of course, which they will use to bribe ISPs into not withdrawing service from less profitable rural areas, not jacking up the rates of those living within those areas.

20  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Program to open groups of programs. on: February 06, 2015, 04:26:32 AM
My Lacuna Launcher from NANY 2009.  smiley
21  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: Firefox won't play videos unless I keep moving the mouse! Ugh! on: February 05, 2015, 12:24:36 PM
I have not seen that problem since WinME, and I fixed it back then by uninstalling and then reinstalling Flash.
22  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: silly humor - post 'em here! [warning some NSFW and adult content] on: February 04, 2015, 12:02:52 PM
From Twitter: "This is why I can't go on Wheel of Fortune RT @jmoneytooreal: luck be in the air tonight"

[attach=1]
23  Main Area and Open Discussion / Living Room / Re: Want to be in my story? See inside. on: February 04, 2015, 01:36:37 AM
Grin app has been updated, lol!  possibly NSFW:



At first, I was almost afraid to look, with that NSFW tag.
24  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: stickies Notezilla memoboard as full-blown personal note system on: January 30, 2015, 04:15:57 PM
I'd like to try it and see how it compares to Slack.

It's not really comparable to Slack and would not replace it. (we use both at work)

I would compare Slack to other live chat environments, such as IRC, Jabber, texting over Skype, etc.

Trello has more in common with stickie notes and project management software, than a chat room or instant messaging.
25  Main Area and Open Discussion / General Software Discussion / Re: stickies Notezilla memoboard as full-blown personal note system on: January 30, 2015, 02:15:31 PM
For multi-user collaboration, I'd suggest taking a look at Trello, which can also serve as a fantastic project management tool.

They use it a lot where I work, for everything from assigning books & courses to teaching assistants, to brainstorming for new project ideas, to their Agile board.

I have begun using it for collaboration with a few other people, to organize the books yet to be added to my free programming ebook site (which was a lot of work copying over my Notezilla notes for every book to be considered, but well worth it)

[attachthumb=1]

There are quite a few videos about Trello on youtube, covering everything from using it as a personal ToDo list to project management. It has a lot of features that Notezilla doesn't have.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaDf1RqeLfo" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaDf1RqeLfo</a>

Oh, and it's free!  Wink
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