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General Software Discussion / Windows 10 Audio Question
« on: January 30, 2020, 06:32 PM »
I am not sure how much of this info is relevant, so I will provide it all.

  • I have a Dell Precision M4800 laptop with Windows 10 Pro.
  • I have this port replicator docking station.
  • I have a set of external speakers plugged into the 3.5mm headphone jack of the docking station.
  • I have 2 sets of these wireless bluetooth headphones. (one to use while other is charging)

- When the speakers are plugged in, they become the default for sound.

- When either pair of headphones are connected while the speakers are plugged in, there is no sound through the headphones. Sound continues to come from the speakers, only.

- I must unplug the speakers for the headphones to work.

What I want to happen: When either pair of headphones are connected, Windows should prefer them over the speakers, automatically cut the sound from the speakers, and allow me to listen through the headphones. (without having to unplug the speakers)

Is there a way to make that happen?

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Leaked Documents Expose the Secretive Market for Your Web Browsing Data

"Although the data does not include personal information such as users' names, it still contains a wealth of specific browsing data, and experts say it could be possible to deanonymize certain users."

"Until recently, Avast was collecting the browsing data of its customers who had installed the company's browser plugin, which is designed to warn users of suspicious websites. Security researcher and AdBlock Plus creator Wladimir Palant published a blog post in October showing that Avast harvest user data with that plugin. Shortly after, browser makers Mozilla, Opera, and Google removed Avast's and subsidiary AVG's extensions from their respective browser extension stores. Avast had previously explained this data collection and sharing in a blog and forum post in 2015. Avast has since stopped sending browsing data collected by these extensions to Jumpshot, Avast said in a statement to Motherboard and PCMag.

However, the data collection is ongoing, the source and documents indicate. Instead of harvesting information through software attached to the browser, Avast is doing it through the anti-virus software itself. Last week, months after it was spotted using its browser extensions to send data to Jumpshot, Avast began asking its existing free antivirus consumers to opt-in to data collection, according to an internal document."

"De-anonymization becomes a greater concern when considering how the eventual end-users of Jumpshot's data could combine it with their own data.

"Most of the threats posed by de-anonymization—where you are identifying people—comes from the ability to merge the information with other data," Acar said. A set of Jumpshot data obtained by Motherboard and PCMag shows how each visited URL comes with a precise timestamp down to the millisecond, which could allow a company with its own bank of customer data to see one user visiting their own site, and then follow them across other sites in the Jumpshot data.

"It's almost impossible to de-identify data," Eric Goldman, a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law, said. "When they promise to de-identify the data, I don't believe it."

Screenshot - 1_29_2020 , 5_48_16 PM.png
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/qjdkq7/avast-antivirus-sells-user-browsing-data-investigation

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Living Room / The AI’s Carol
« on: December 25, 2019, 10:28 PM »
What happens when you train an AI with existing Christmas carols and then ask it to write its own, based on what it now knows?

922-9efabfce-d807-4a96-926d-216a302cc2cc[1].png
https://aiweirdness.com/post/189845472982/the-ais-carol

A voice actor decided to record the first Rudolph one, and it's awesome: https://twitter.com/JoeZieja/status/1209511648618172421

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DC Gamer Club / Rabbids Coding - Learning Through Play
« on: October 09, 2019, 07:11 PM »
Rabbids Coding is a game created to be a fun and engaging educational experience, giving people the tools to get excited about learning to code. Players are tasked with cleaning up a spaceship that has been overrun by the Rabbids, which can be achieved by either providing simple instructions to a Rabbid wearing a mind-control device, or by dropping sausages in their line of sight. The game doesn't require any previous knowledge of coding at all; instructions are simple and can be dragged from a menu, placed in order, and tested with the play button. Didn't get the results you were expecting? Don't worry, just see where it went wrong, move some things around, and try again!

Rabbids Coding has been created to allow you to play with the concepts of coding, without constant supervision or instruction from a teacher. It gives you the independence to learn at your own pace, whatever your age. Your goal in each level is to provide the simplest instructions possible to get the task done. Once you've proven yourself in the basics, a sandbox environment becomes available, allowing you to explore and play with the instructions to see what you can do.

rabbids1_356646[1].jpg
https://news.ubisoft.com/en-us/article/356649/Rabbids-Coding-Learning-Through-Play

Suitable for ages 7 and up. Currently being given away here: https://register.ubisoft.com/rabbids-coding/en-US


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Living Room / The Mysterious Origins of an Uncrackable Atari Game
« on: September 23, 2019, 07:29 PM »
Released in 1982, Entombed was far from a best-seller and today it’s largely forgotten. But recently, a computer scientist and a digital archaeologist decided to pull apart the game’s source code to investigate how it was made. An early maze-navigating game, Entombed intrigued the researchers for how early programmers solved the problem of drawing a solvable maze that is drawn procedurally.

But they got more than they bargained for: they found a mystery bit of code they couldn’t explain. The fundamental logic that determines how the maze is drawn is locked in a table of possible values written in the games code. However, it seems the logic behind the table has been lost forever.

Screenshot - 9_23_2019 , 8_24_33 PM.png
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190919-the-maze-puzzle-hidden-within-an-early-video-game

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